brain http://wrvo.org en Possible treatment for Parkinson's developed upstate http://wrvo.org/post/possible-treatment-parkinsons-developed-upstate <div class="card-content"><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden "><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p></p><p>Researchers in upstate New York have developed a new cell therapy that could treat Parkinson’s disease, a neurological disorder which affects motor function. The study from the University of Rochester Medical Center suggests this new approach could not only halt progression of the disease, but also reverse its impact on the brain. Thu, 13 Feb 2014 12:07:37 +0000 Kate O'Connell 51215 at http://wrvo.org Possible treatment for Parkinson's developed upstate Researchers pinpoint where in the brain Alzheimer's begins http://wrvo.org/post/researchers-pinpoint-where-brain-alzheimers-begins <p></p> Wed, 29 Jan 2014 13:00:26 +0000 Kate O'Connell 50570 at http://wrvo.org Cross-train your brain to fight cognitive decline http://wrvo.org/post/cross-train-your-brain-fight-cognitive-decline <p>Moments of forgetfulness happen to everyone. Whether it’s losing your car keys or not remembering why you opened the refrigerator, it can be frustrating to blank out when trying to remember something. When those moments happen, it’s easy to attribute it to an aging mind. But forgetfulness doesn't have to be a symptom of encroaching old age. In fact, advances in science are enabling us to reclaim lost ground and even prevent loss of memory and function.</p><p>This week on <em>Take Care</em>, <a href="http://csde.washington.edu/people/interests.php?id=139">Dr. Sherry Willis</a>, discusses cognitive function and how older adults can keep their minds sharp. Willis is an adjunct research professor in the department of psychology at the University of Washington in Seattle.</p><p><strong>Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Sherry Willis.</strong></p><p> Mon, 25 Nov 2013 00:00:00 +0000 Take Care Staff 47505 at http://wrvo.org Cross-train your brain to fight cognitive decline With strokes, "time saved is brain saved" http://wrvo.org/post/strokes-time-saved-brain-saved <p>While time is often a major factor in determining how much damage a medical ailment can cause, it is especially true with strokes. Under the right conditions, the reversibility of stroke symptoms can decrease by the minute. But why is the saying “time saved is brain saved” so important when it comes to strokes?</p><p>This week on <em>Take Care</em>, <a href="http://www.dukehealth.org/physicians/larry_b_goldstein">Dr. Larry Goldstein</a>, discusses how to recognize a stroke, and why time is of the essence when it comes to treating them. Dr. Goldstein is a professor of neurology at Duke University and director of the Duke Comprehensive Stroke Center in North Carolina.</p><p><strong>Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Goldstein.</strong></p><p> Mon, 18 Nov 2013 00:01:00 +0000 Take Care 47157 at http://wrvo.org With strokes, "time saved is brain saved" Time and awareness is key to treating a stroke http://wrvo.org/post/time-and-awareness-key-treating-stroke <p></p><p><em>Knowing how to recognize the symptoms of stroke can mean the difference between life and death. Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen, hosts of WRVO's health and wellness show </em><a href="http://wrvo.org/programs/take-care-wrvo-1-npr-news">Take Care</a><em>, spoke with Dr. Larry Goldstein, professor of neurology and director of Duke University's Stroke Center about what you should do if you suspect a loved one has had a stroke.</em></p><p><em>Lorraine Rapp: Describe what takes place in the body when a person is having a stroke?</em></p> Fri, 15 Nov 2013 11:09:04 +0000 WRVO News 47155 at http://wrvo.org Upstate Medical University says new labs will promote brain research http://wrvo.org/post/upstate-medical-university-says-new-labs-will-promote-brain-research <p></p> Wed, 23 Oct 2013 11:59:40 +0000 Ellen Abbott 46050 at http://wrvo.org Upstate Medical University says new labs will promote brain research Fear is in the mind of the beholder http://wrvo.org/post/fear-mind-beholder <p>You’re watching a scary movie. As the suspense begins building, you notice that your heart rate increases, your pupils dilate, and you that you are beginning to sweat. Is it hot in the room? No, that’s not what’s causing it. What you’re experiencing is good ol’ fashioned fear.</p><p>This week on <em>Take Care</em>, <a href="http://www.psych.nyu.edu/phelpslab/whoweare.html">Dr. Liz Phelps </a>discusses two kinds of fear: real and fake. Dr. Phelps is the director of the <a href="http://www.psych.nyu.edu/phelpslab/whatwedo.html">Phelps Lab at NYU</a> and a professor in psychology. Her research focuses on how human learning and memory are changed by emotion, and what neural systems mediate the interactions between the three.</p><p><strong>Click 'Read More' to hear our interview with Dr. Phelps.</strong></p><p> Mon, 21 Oct 2013 14:10:08 +0000 Take Care Staff 45928 at http://wrvo.org Fear is in the mind of the beholder Images of the brain could unlock learning difficulties http://wrvo.org/post/images-brain-could-unlock-learning-difficulties <div class="card-content"><div class="field field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden "><div class="field-items"><div class="field-item even"><p>Researchers in western New York have been using brain scans to add to our understanding of how humans comprehend numbers. The new data could have implications in diagnosing learning disabilities earlier on, and aid in our understanding of why some kids struggle at school. Fri, 05 Apr 2013 19:38:19 +0000 Kate O'Connell 35703 at http://wrvo.org Images of the brain could unlock learning difficulties