News

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With a Supreme Court ruling expected in the coming days, the future of the Affordable Care Act is in the hands of the justices. One local lawmaker expects there will be changes to the controversial health care law, one way or the other.

Rep. Richard Hanna (R-Barneveld) says he has no idea which way the court will come down on King v. Burwell. That’s the case that could cripple the law, especially in the 36 states that aren’t subsidizing health care on their own, but letting the federal government do it.  

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It turns out the legislative session will not be ending as planned and will continue on for at least another week.

After a week of gridlock, Gov. Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders decided to take a break and adjourn for five days. Before they left, they renewed New York City’s expired rent laws, but only until Tuesday.

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Lung cancer is considered the leading cause of cancer deaths among both men and women. How can it be prevented and who is more likely to get it?

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Martin Edelman talks about what can cause lung cancer and who can develop it. Edelman is head of the Solid Tumor Oncology Department at the University of Maryland’s Greenebaum Cancer Center.

Is Facebook making us sad?

Jun 21, 2015
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Facebook and the world of social media has given the average person easy access to friends, family and even strangers’ lives with the click of a button or swipe of the thumb. But does having that access make our lives sadder?

This week on “Take Care,” Mai-Ly Nguyen Steers addresses the surprising link between Facebook and depression. Steers is a social psychologist at the University of Houston. Her study, "Seeing Everyone Else's Highlight Reels: How Facebook Usage is Linked to Depressive Symptoms," was published in the Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology.

Baldomero Fernandez

  What has been the role, not of liberalism, but of the genuine Left, in recent American politics?  What is its agenda, and its future?  In this edition of the Campbell Conversations, host Grant Reeher talks with The Nation's editor, Katrina vanden Heuvel, on the magazine's 150th anniversary.  They cover domestic politics and policy, inequality, and America's role in the world.  They also look at the curre

Mike Folsom

Shipping traffic on the St. Lawrence River has resumed after a luxury cruise ship stuck in the Eisenhower Lock in Massena was removed Saturday. The ship struck a wall as it attempted to maneuver into the lock Thursday night.  Passengers on the MS St.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The Central New York Regional Economic Development Council is getting ready to put together a proposal for the latest competition for state economic development dollars.  

Facebook, social comparison and depression

Jun 19, 2015
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Americans are spending more and more time on social media. But that can lead to an unexpected impact on the mental health of social media users. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "take care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen interview University of Houston social psychologist Mai-Ly Nguyen Steers about her research into the links between Facebook and depression. Steers’ study "Seeing Everyone Else's Highlight Reels: How Facebook Usage is Linked to Depressive Symptoms," was published in the Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

 

The Greater Utica Chamber of Commerce held what they're calling "chamber day" for the first time on Thursday. The goal was to connect local businesses in the Utica area to each other.

 

Julia Botero / WRVO News

A cruise ship crashed into a lock on the St. Lawrence River Thursday night, injuring 17 people. According to the U.S. Coast Guard, the 286-foot Saint Laurent hit a wall in the Eisenhower Lock along the St. Lawrence in Massena, just after 9 p.m. Thursday.

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​The legislative session is now likely to go into next week, as ​Gov. Andrew Cuomo and ​lawmakers ​have agreed to renew New York City’s rent laws for five days, ​​as they ​struggle to reach final deals on that and other remaining issues.  

The leader of the state Senate, John Flanagan, said he’d allow senators to go home for a few days, after they finish their business Thursday evening, even though there are no agreements with the Assembly or Cuomo on the New York City rent laws, a related tax break for real estate developers, and an education tax credit.

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New York politicians are raising concerns that the sale of medical device manufacturer Welch Allyn could put central New York jobs in jeopardy.

When Hill-Rom announced Wednesday morning that it is acquiring Welch Allyn, it did not say that any jobs would be eliminated at the Skaneateles Falls-based company. But that's what was immediately on the mind of the lawmakers who represent the central New York in Washington, D.C.

Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) told reporters Wednesday he had a “call in” to company representatives to find out more.

Bret Jaspers / WSKG News file photo

The city of Syracuse is moving ahead with a strategy to improve access to broadband for businesses and residents.  

The problem is there aren’t enough affordable, high speed internet broadband options for residents or businesses in Syracuse. And that means that Syracuse isn’t competing on a level playing field with other cities when it comes to economic development, says Ben Walsh, Syracuse’s deputy commissioner of neighborhoods and business development.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Leaders of all of the state’s local governments, as well as unions representing teachers and public workers, are warning state lawmakers not to simply renew the state’s property tax cap without some changes.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

The legislative session is expected to  continue for at least longer than scheduled, as Gov. Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders remain gridlocked on extending New York City’s rent laws, and have not settled a host of other issues. The session was supposed to end Wednesday.

Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie, following a private meeting with Cuomo, says he expects the session to last at least another day, as they continue to struggle with renewing the now expired rent regulations.

As summer approaches, the city of Syracuse is again cracking down on a sector that's caused trouble in low-income neighborhoods in the past, corner stores.

City hall’s crackdown on corner stores is meant to curb what Mayor Stephanie Miner has in the past called a scourge in many neighborhoods -- corner stores that have health and safety issues, leading to neighborhood complaints.

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Central New York-based medical device manufacturer Welch Allyn is being acquired by Chicago-based Hill-Rom, also a medical device manufacturer, for $2.05 billion in cash and stock, the companies announced Wednesday morning.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

  A program that started a couple of years ago in Syracuse, continues to try to get more central New Yorkers out for a walk.  

Jennifer Pagan and Barb Procopio of Syracuse love to walk.

"I walk indoors in the winter, but outdoors just to be in the fresh air and the beautiful parks.  And After that miserable winter that we had, it’s nice to be outside," agreed Pagan and Procopio. "Walking is so good for everything."

BlackRiverny.com

 

The Adirondacks and the St. Lawrence River are top-notch destinations for people looking to fish and boat in the summertime. The Black River, which winds through Lewis and Jefferson counties, doesn’t enjoy that reputation.

Towns along the river want to change that, but they have a big job ahead of them. For a century the river has been used for industry, not tourism. Now, the river is the process of a transformation. 

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Twelve days after two convicted killers escaped from a state prison near Plattsburgh, some state lawmakers are considering new legislation and holding hearings to correct what they see as flaws in the state’s prisons system that  may have contributed to the break out.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress National American Woman Suffrage Association Collection / Washington Area Spark via Flickr

Sponsors of a bill to put Harriet Tubman's face on U.S. currency say they're getting a lot of support. Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) is one of the seven original representatives who introduced the bill in Congress earlier this month, noting that it has been a true bipartisan piece of legislation.

"We've already got co-sponsors from the entire spectrum in the congress. Democrats, Republicans, males, females, African Americans, everything," Katko says. "It's a great cross-section of support for it and there seems to be a lot of excitement about it."

Wallyg / via Flickr

The New York state legislature is due to adjourn later this week, but there’s still no agreement by Assembly Democrats on an education tax credit sought by Gov. Andrew Cuomo that would allow donors a tax credit when they give up to a million dollars for private school scholarships and some public school programs.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO file photo

Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) has joined the movement in Congress to make the NCAA more accountable. 

Katko is among five House of Representatives members introducing a bill that would reform the way the NCAA oversees college sports. The legislation would require the NCAA to be more transparent in how it deals with disciplinary cases, which include investigations that sometimes go on years. There would also be some sort of legal avenue for schools or athletes accused of transgressions.  

Karen Dewitt / WRVO

The New York City rent laws expired Monday night as Gov. Andrew Cuomo and legislators continued to negotiate on the rent laws, a related pretty tax break for developers, and an education tax credit.   

Assembly Democrats approved a temporary 48-hour extension of the laws, which affect around one million apartments. But rather than pass a temporary extension, Senate Republicans approved an 8-year extension of the laws late Monday night.

Matt Richmond / WSKG News

Starting as early as the end of the summer, all officers in the City of Ithaca Police Department are going to wear body cameras. City of Ithaca Police Chief John Barber presented the department’s camera policy to common council members earlier this month. The policy includes rules for operating the cameras, storing the videos and releasing them to the public.

Julia Botero / WRVO News

The race for mayor in Watertown is heating up. Three candidates have thrown their hat in the ring to run against incumbent Jeff Graham in November's election. 

Stephen Jennings, Joseph  Butler and Mayor Jeffrey Graham work together on a weekly basis. Both Jennings and Butler are city council members.  Both believe the city needs a new leader at the top.

“There is no vision to me. That is my great frustration and I feel that the things I envision are not going to be enacted in this current council. I think we need a change,” Jennings said.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Lyme disease has been spreading in upstate New York for the past few years. For example, there were 57 cases in Oswego County in 2014 compared to just five cases in 2009. Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) has introduced legislation that he says would help prevent the disease and educate the public.

Debi Collins found a bullseye rash on her arm, six weeks after she had been working outside one day. Her doctor told her they didn't have Lyme disease in Madison County.

Wally Gobetz / Flickr

 

New York’s Board of Regents meets Monday and Tuesday to finalize controversial new teacher evaluation laws ahead of a June 30 deadline.

When legislators mandated the evaluation system in the state budget, they left out some details. Now the state Education Department is writing those rules, and the Regents will vote on them.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

The final week of New York’s legislative session begins Monday, and so far, Gov. Andrew Cuomo and lawmakers have still not come to agreement on a number of major laws that expire.  

New York City’s rent laws, which impact over one million apartments, sunset at midnight. They are tied, through legislation, to a property tax cap important to suburbanites and upstaters. Also set to expire -- a tax break for large real estate developers who agree to set aside some of their projects for affordable housing, and mayoral control of the New York City schools.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

The Syracuse City School district reached a contract agreement with its teachers, which district officials are calling historic. 

The deal offers teachers pay raises over the next five years, ranging from three to five percent.  It marks the biggest raises the teachers have received in a decade, and makes them among the highest paid teachers in the region. 

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