News

The U.S. Senate plans to use procedural maneuvers to technically stay in session even when senators eventually go home for the Labor Day recess. Their intent is to prevent President Donald Trump from making any unwelcome recess appointments while they are away.

In Albany, taking steps to keep the legislative chambers open is nothing new.

On a day earlier this week, Assemblywoman Patricia Fahy stood on the podium in the vast Assembly chamber. She banged the gavel, and began what sounded like an ordinary day in the state Legislature.

Veronica Volk / Great Lakes Today

The decision to lower outflows from Lake Ontario is being criticized by shoreline residents who are suffering from flooding, but some are defending the move, saying safety of those on the St. Lawrence Seaway was on the line.

The International Joint Commission (IJC) reduced discharges from Lake Ontario by only 4 percent last week. Still, that was enough to make a major difference according to those on both sides of the Moses-Saunders Dam.

Sun sensitivity, sun allergies & PLE

Aug 12, 2017
geoff dude / Flickr

For many people, one of the joys of summer is spending time in the sun. But other people are extremely sensitive to sun. And some people can have an allergic reaction to the sun called polymorphous light eruption.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Rosemarie Ingleton, professor of dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital, discusses sun sensitivity and polymorphous light eruption. Ingleton is also an instructor at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

Hamza Butt / Flickr

Would you admit a mistake if it meant legal action and potentially the end of your career? Doctors are put in a hard spot when it comes to making an error. Mistakes happen, no matter what your profession, but when life is on the line -- how do you come to terms with a bad decision?

Some in the medical community are now training doctors to better make mistakes, to admit to them and to learn from them. Joining us this week to discuss this approach is Dr. Neha Vapiwala. She’s a vice chair of education, radiation oncology and the advisory dean at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Vapiwala wrote an essay on this topic, which appeared in “The Philadelphia Enquirer.”

WRVO News

One of the bright spots in the recent history of the city of Syracuse has been the redevelopment of parts of the city's downtown area. One of the primary movers of that revitalization has been Robert Doucette. This week, Doucette joins Grant Reeher to discuss the city, economic development, and the replacement of Interstate 81 through downtown.

When sun sensitivity becomes something more

Aug 11, 2017
Sarah Joy / Flickr

After a long winter, many people look forward to spending time in the sun when summer rolls around. But for some people, that's difficult because they have sun sensitivity. This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with dermatologist Dr. Rosemarie Ingleton, a professor at Mt. Sinai Hospital and instructor at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Dr. Ingleton discusses sun sensitivity, sun allergies and polymorphous light eruption.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Passionate messages on Syracuse’s future came through Thursday at a forum for the city’s mayoral candidates. The candidates spoke to an intimate crowd of downtown’s young professionals.

The event was hosted by the pro-Syracuse advocacy group, 40 Below, in a co-working space. Designated Democratic candidate and common councilor Joe Nicoletti wants them to know his experience and his relationships at the state and federal level will move the city forward.

Allan Menkel

Researchers are trying to document the summer of high water on Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River. They're asking shoreline residents and local officials to fill out an online survey.

Payne R Horning / WRVO News

An Oswego landlord is accused of asking his tenants for sexual favors in exchange for reduced rent. The sexual harassment allegations against Doug Waterbury are part of a lawsuit filed by a Syracuse fair housing organization. 

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

State lawmakers and volunteer firefighters are putting pressure on Gov. Andrew Cuomo to sign a bill that would provide better coverage for volunteers who develop cancer because of the job they do.

Brian McQueen has been a longtime volunteer with the Whitesboro Fire Department. When he was diagnosed with Non-Hodgkin lymphoma several years ago, he was forced to take on the cost of much of the treatment himself. He doesn’t want any other volunteers to have to face that.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

A yearly procession to commemorate the use of nuclear weapons on Hiroshima and Nagasaki Japan took place in Syracuse yesterday. Organizers said the drive to abolish nuclear weapons is more important than ever in today’s political climate.

Activist Rea Kramer said we can not forget the destruction that followed the use of nuclear weapons over 70 years ago.

"I think we should all be especially anxious now because there is a president who uses the words, “fire and fury,” as a response to the threatening postures of North Korea," Kramer said.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

Now that the Mohawk Valley Health System has secured the necessary state funding, designs are underway for its new hospital in downtown Utica. Officials working on the project say the hospital will breathe new life into downtown and make the surrounding area more attractive. But that could come at the expense of dozens of businesses that are already operating in the proposed footprint.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO News File Photo

There’s some good news and some bad news from the state comptroller’s office. The state’s nearly $200 billion pension fund is doing well, thanks in part to the booming stock market, but there are some worrisome signs for the future of New York’s finances.

Comptroller Tom DiNapoli said the pension fund is up this quarter by 2.9 percent, and has increased 11.5 percent from last year. DiNapoli said he likes to think that he and his staff have invested wisely, but he said a major factor is the booming stock market.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Onondaga County lawmakers are considering legislation that would ensure that juveniles are not thrown in solitary confinement in any of the county’s criminal justice facilities in the future.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

This year's flooding along Lake Ontario has taken a toll on municipalities, exhausting their resources and threatening their infrastructure. That's the case in Oswego where the city recently took an inventory of the destruction caused by the unprecedented water levels.

File Photo
New York Now / WMHT

The former EPA regional administrator under President Barack Obama said scientists who leaked the report about further evidence of climate change to The New York Times should be commended as “whistleblowers.”

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Four children in central New York were hit by cars last week and three of them died from their injuries. It can be a dangerous time of year for kids out of school.

Sgt. Jon Seeber with the Onondaga County Sheriff’s Office said they have seen this increase in kids being hit by cars during the summer before and many times it comes down to child pedestrian errors.

“They tend to play, talk and not pay attention to cars when crossing the street,” Seeber said. "I think it is really important for parents and adults that we supervise them as best we can."

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Syracuse Mayoral Hopeful Laura Lavine says, if elected, she would push for mayoral control of the Syracuse City School District.

kristen_a / Flickr

It’s been a busy summer for the Onondaga County Board of Elections. There were more challenges to the petition process than usual, and appeals of decisions will soon be underway. But September primary ballots are coming together.

Spring and early summer is the time political candidates go door to door asking for help getting on the ballot. Election law is very precise when it comes to who can sign petitions for particular candidates, and how election workers handle the documents.

wamc.org

There's a lawsuit now in New York that could expand the rights of farm workers. Under state law, farm workers aren't allowed to bargain collectively, but the New York State Constitution may say something different.

USACE

In a long-awaited report, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says new measures are needed to prevent Asian carp from getting into the Great Lakes.

The report says the current defense at the Brandon Road lock in Illinois – an underwater electric barrier – should be beefed up. The Army Corps' recommended plan would add water jets and complex noises – like the underwater recordings of a boat motor.

WRVO News

A hot topic among local governments in central New York recently, is proposing ways to share services. But one Syracuse mayoral candidate with ties to the Consensus Commission on government consolidation is sharing his thoughts on its most controversial recommendation.

ceedub13 / Flickr, Creative Commons

The government body that regulates water levels on Lake Ontario is reducing the outflows to the St. Lawrence River. The International Joint Commission (IJC) says water levels have dropped rapidly, down 12 inches since the peak in late May. That's drawing some criticism from shoreline residents who say the move is premature.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Parts of upstate New York have been receiving record amounts of rainfall this year. The rain is one of the contributing factors to the high water levels on Lake Ontario which has caused extensive property damage. But it is also taking a toll on local farmers.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

New York state stands to lose nearly $1 billion if President Donald Trump follows through with his threat to “let Obamacare fail” and cut key health care subsidies under the Affordable Care Act.

Trump has the power to end the subsidies, known as cost-sharing reductions, and he’s said he’ll withhold the payments as a way to pressure the Senate to find a way to repeal and replace the ACA.

The subsidies help pay for premiums for lower-income Americans.

Gino Santo Maria / shutterstock

On Monday, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is releasing a study detailing the best ways to prevent Asian carp from getting into the Great Lakes.

A document outlining the study says the current defense – an underwater electric barrier – should be beefed up. The recommended plan would add complex noises – like the underwater recordings of a boat motor.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The future of Interstate 81 through downtown Syracuse hinges on an independent investigation of the options, currently being overseen by the New York State Department of Transportation. In the meantime, champions of different options for the aging highway continue to butt heads.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

Every summer, 60,000-90,000 people from all over the country come to a sprawling forest in Oswego County for a unique medieval-style experience every summer. The Sterling Renaissance Festival, set in the 16th century town of Warwick, England, gives visitors a chance to experience life as it was then.

WRVO's Payne Horning visited the renowned festival and sent this audio post card.

The Sterling Renaissance Festival runs through August 13.

Who monitors meal kit safety?

Aug 5, 2017
Robert Nelson / Flickr

Meal kits are all the rage right now. With many of us continually searching for healthy meals that are as convenient as possible, what could be better than having all the ingredients for a home-cooked meal delivered directly to your home? But shipping perishable foods in a way that keeps them safe and fresh can be a challenge.

This week on “Take Care,” Don Schaffner, a food microbiologist at Rutgers University, discusses the safety precautions meal kit consumers should be aware of. Schaffner was part of a team funded by the USDA to study the microbial safety of mail order foods, and he's currently involved in developing best practices and guidance for companies that ship perishable foods via the mail. He also co-hosts a podcast on microbial food safety at foodsafetytalk.com.

Types of hernia, risk factors and treatment

Aug 5, 2017
Bob Mical / Flickr

A hernia doesn’t always cause pain. In fact, often doctors only find a hernia during a physical exam of their patient. And surgery isn’t always necessary. We’re busting some myths about hernia this week and asking questions you may have been too scared to ask.

Dr. Michael Rosen joins us this week on "Take Care" to discuss some common types of hernia, as well as treatment options. Rosen is a professor of surgery at Lerner College of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland Clinic Foundation. He’s also the director of the Cleveland Clinic Comprehensive Hernia Center.

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