News

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

The New York State Senate and Assembly will release their one-house budgets this week, as the March 31 deadline for a new spending plan draws near. They’ve already given some hints as to what the plans will include.

Senate Republicans are rejecting, for now, Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s extension of a tax on millionaires. They say they also are against pretty much all of the other taxes and fees in the governor’s budget, including a proposed new tax on internet purchases, a surcharge on prepaid cellphones and higher fees at the Department of Motor Vehicles.

Wayne Marshall / via Flickr

After three years of rejection, the city of Syracuse is again applying for federal funding to reduce childhood lead poisoning. The money would be used to eliminate the hazards in a home that can result in lead poisoning. Commissioner of Neighborhood and Business Development Paul Driscoll said this year’s application will also include inspecting homes for other potential dangers.

"It could be mold, radon, asbestos or pest infestation that leads to asthma," Driscoll said. "We’re trying to address all the health hazards in a house with one visit, one application."

Payne Horning / WRVO News

A hostile crowd in Ithaca lambasted Finger Lakes Rep. Tom Reed (R-Corning) this weekend over his support for legislation to replace the Affordable Care Act. The Republican said his party’s proposal was just the first step in a long process to reform the country’s healthcare system, but the participant’s in Saturday’s town hall said congress is heading in the wrong direction.

WRVO Public Media

Despite the rapid progress in the public acceptance of marriage equality, at least when compared with past civil rights struggles, same-sex marriage remains controversial, and some worry that it will weaken the institution of marriage itself.  This week on the Campbell Conversations, host Grant Reeher speaks with Princeton University Professor Stephen Macedo, author of a new book on marriage equality which argues that same-sex marriage not only strengthens the institution of marriage, it also strengthens the norm of monogamy and even bolsters the foundational values of democracy.

Genetics and cancer: why testing can aid prevention

Mar 11, 2017
lorna / Flickr

No one wants to talk about cancer. A disease that has taken the lives of so many, even the word itself has an ominous connotation. But as much as we don’t want to talk about it, new genetic technology suggests that starting the conversation about your family’s cancer history might be in everyone’s best interest.

In her new book, "A Cancer in the Family: Take Control of your Genetic Inheritance," Dr. Theodora Ross addresses how our family’s medical history plays a role in our health. To shed some light on the genetics of cancer, as well as genetic counseling, Ross spoke with “Take Care” to explain the importance of knowing your family history. Ross, a cancer geneticist, is director of University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center’s cancer genetics program.

Should you avoid aspartame?

Mar 11, 2017
Steve Snodgrass / Flickr

The harmful effects sugar can have on the body has been given a lot of attention. Known for sabotaging diets and packing on extra calories, many people try to avoid sugar by seeking out artificial sweeteners as an alternative. But according to a new study by the Harvard Medical School, one common sugar substitute, aspartame, could be sabotaging your diet, too. And ironically enough, it is often used most in “diet” products (diet soda, for example).

To understand more about this study, this week on “Take Care” Dr. Richard Hodin, professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School, discusses the effects of aspartame on the body.

Cancer and your family

Mar 10, 2017

Cancer is a scary word and people are often reluctant to talk about. That can make it difficult to find out about your family history of the disease. And even if you do know that many of your relatives have had cancer, would you get tested for it yourself? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Theodora Ross, who directs the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center's Cancer Genetics Program.

We reached our goal! And that means, although we had planned to fundraise until Saturday afternoon, we're done with on-air fundraising for the rest of the day. We thought it might happen early, and you made it possible with your contributions.

As of this morning, we've raised $184,000 -- that's actually $4,000 above our original goal. We had an incredible first two hours of "Morning Edition," thanks to some challenges and some listeners who were up early today, and were able to finish the fundraiser more than a day early.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

A youth mental health task force has identified some of the largest gaps in mental health services in central New York. The lawmakers who launched the study say they will now look for ways to fill those gaps.

"I listen to WRVO as part of my job, monitoring the quality of the audio and transmitter coverage. We also use a variety of techniques to send audio from WRVO to the 10 repeater stations in our network, and each one must be checked regularly."

A day in the life of our chief engineer, Jeff Windsor, as he listens with a sensitive ear. But don't think he doesn't relax now and then to just enjoy the programs!

"I also listen to WRVO because I find the tone of the programs, newscasters and hosts to be level-headed and not sensational."

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Archbishop Cardinal Timothy Dolan of New York will preside over the funeral mass Friday for retired Bishop James Moynihan at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Syracuse. The Roman Catholic Diocese of Syracuse announced Moynihan died on Monday.

During his tenure, Moynihan oversaw many of the biggest issues facing the Catholic Church in the past two decades.  

Moynihan's body was brought to the cathedral on Thursday. Following Friday's funeral, Moynihan will be buried in the Cathedral crypt in Syracuse.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Republican candidate for mayor of Syracuse Laura Lavine said she would turn the city around like she has with the Lafayette School District. Lavine has spent 40 years in public education and is in her third year as the district’s superintendent. Lavine said she would use her administrative skills as mayor.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

Members of a leading senior citizens lobbying group are advocating for a retirement plan in New York that could benefit their children and grandchildren.

The proposal by AARP could help address a big change in employer practices that’s occurred since the group’s members – who are 50 and older – began their working lives. That is the sharp decline in companies that offer pensions, or even 401(k) retirement accounts, leaving younger workers with no opportunities at work to save for their retirement.

www.bbb.org

Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s health department is analyzing the plan in the Republican Congress to overhaul the Affordable Care Act, and finds it carries a heavy price tag for New York. 

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

A provision in the Affordable Care Act replacement plan by Republicans in Congress sets up a potential clash with New York state over abortion coverage. 

The plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act by the GOP-led Congress includes tax credits for people to buy insurance policies. The Republican House plan forbids anyone from using the tax credits to buy an insurance plan that covers abortions.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

Students at SUNY Oswego are trying to start a food recycling program that would donate leftovers from the college's dining halls to a nearby food pantry, but they're getting some pushback from the business that operates campus dining. 

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The Republican healthcare plan to replace the Affordable Care Act will likely change significantly before it comes to the House for a vote, according to Rep. John Katko. The central New York Republican said he has concerns with the legislation, which he has shared with House leadership.

Payne Horning / WRVO News

Despite continued downsizing at Fort Drum, the base's impact on the local economy actually increased in 2016.

The northern New York army base spent nearly $1.2 billion dollars last year. That's down by about $300 million from 2015 with most of those cuts from payroll. That influx of money indirectly supported about $400 million in economic activity across Jefferson, Lewis and St. Lawrence counties.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

The state budget is due in 3 1/2 weeks, but the biggest push at the Capitol is for a change that is not a spending item. It’s a measure to treat 16- and 17-year-olds as children, not adults, when they are charged with serious crimes.

Many leading legislators say, for them, the issue is personal.

Those who support raising the age when New Yorkers are treated as adults in the criminal justice system from 16 to 18 held a rally Tuesday at the Capitol. Many of the leading Democrats in the Legislature spoke, including Senate Democratic Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

More than a year ago, the central New York region was awarded $500 million over five years from Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s Upstate Revitalization Initiative. Some critics say the money has not yet gone to some of the region’s big projects.

Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner said she is not satisfied because funding for a veterans complex, inland port and the city’s Say Yes to Education program has not materialized.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

In a wide ranging State of the County speech last night, Onondaga County Executive Joanie Mahoney went on the defensive, saying many economic development projects, proposals and plans are often unfairly represented by critics across Central New York.

David Sommerstein / NCPR file photo

The New York State Assembly held a hearing Monday on Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s plan to spend $8 billion in subsidies to keep three upstate nuclear power plants operating for the next 12 years. But no one from the Cuomo administration showed up.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Upstate Medical University is launching a program targeted at treating youth and young adults at risk for suicide or other self-harming behaviors. This comes at a time when central New York has a suicide mortality rate greater than the state or national average.

Finding psychiatric help for teens or young adults in central New York is often very hard. Families often run into medical roadblocks -- referrals, long waiting lists and simply not enough services to go around.

WRVO News File Photo

Rep. John Katko (R-Camillus) is weighing in on President Donald Trump’s new travel ban, which temporary suspends the visa process for six majority-Muslim nations and refugees. And Katko also has an opinion about the claim that Trump's phone was wiretapped during the 2016 campaign.

Tom Magnarelli / WRVO News

Every week, Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner hosts a protest against President Donald Trump focusing on how Trump’s actions affect local residents. Each rally deals with a specific issue like healthcare, climate change, and most recently immigration. A few Trump supporters have been coming to the protests and Miner has defended their right to speak up in favor of the president. After last week's rally, two central New York women, Tina Higgins of Syracuse and Carol Puschaver of Liverpool, have very different points of view but started having a conversation.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

Democratic committee members in the city of Syracuse started interviewing candidates this weekend, as they decide who to support for an open mayoral seat. And over the weekend, one more mayoral hopeful has joined the crowded field of Democrats hoping to get the nomination.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News File Photo

The Syracuse Common Council has voted to pay for the technology that will allow police to hear gunshots fired in the city in real time. The ShotSpotter program is expected to cost around $200,000 annually. The council approved $300,000 for its first year.

Wiktor Kettel / Flickr CC by-nc 2.0: http://bit.ly/1MJUuvg

This isn't just any spring fundraiser at your local public radio station. We're being upfront about exactly how much money we need to receive to maintain our service to central and northern New York.

Our goal for this spring fundraiser is $180,000. Thanks to generous donations received during February, we're on our way to reaching that goal. But much like our upstate winters tend to hold on, we're not out of the woods yet! We still need to receive about $100,000 during this on-air drive.

Shared housing: an option for the elderly

Mar 4, 2017
Skip Kuebel / Flickr

In recent years, the baby boomer generation has seen a rise in shared housing, or a “Golden Girls” style of living, where rather than living alone, elderly people opt for roommates. There are plenty of reasons for older individuals, namely women, to consider living with a roommate or two, and to find out about some of those reasons, “Take Care” spoke with author, journalist, and baby boomer expert Sally Abrahms.

Cold sores and canker sores: What's the difference?

Mar 4, 2017
AJC1 / Flickr

Whether caused by infection, injury, or stress, cold sores and canker sores are a common occurrence for many of us. Undoubtedly, they’re both very irritating, but is there a difference between the two? To find out, “Take Care” spoke with Dr. Mark Burhenne, a tenured dentist and the expert behind the popular website, “Ask the Dentist: Oral Health for Total Wellness.”

Pages