News

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

When the temperatures drop below zero in the winter, we layer on extra jackets and hunker down inside. The residents at Syracuse's zoo have different ways of dealing with the bitter cold elements.

A pool of bubbling water is probably the last place a human would look for warmth on a frigid January day. But it’s a reprieve from the wind chill for the small Humboldt Penguins at the Rosamond Gifford Zoo in Syracuse.

cjuneau / Flickr

Upstate New York’s harsh winters and even harsher winds can be dangerous. One of the health risks, if you are caught out in the elements, or without a source of heat for a period of time, is hypothermia.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Chris McStay talks about how hypothermia affects the body and how to prevent it. McStay is chief of clinical operations at the department of emergency medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

Alberto Pasini / Flickr

With menopause comes hot flashes, night sweats and more uncomfortable side effects. But what if we told you there was something right in your pocket (or purse) that could help you deal with all of these symptoms?

This week on “Take Care,” we speak with Dr. JoAnn Manson about a new app that can help you deal with menopause. Manson is professor of medicine at Harvard Medical school and chief of preventive medicine a Brigham and Women’s hospital.

Berkeley Political Scientist Wendy Brown offers an interesting spin on the Citizens United case—the problem is not that corporations are seen as people; it’s that people are only seen as political entrepreneurs, and not citizens.  And that move reflects a bigger problem she has written a book about—the shift in much of our thinking toward a market mentality.  This week on the Campbell Conversations host Grant Reeher has a substantive conversation about a supposedly encroaching neoliberalism with Brown, the author of Un

Bitter cold: the basics of hypothermia

Jan 9, 2015
Corey Templeton / Flickr

In these cold winter months, the risk for hypothermia rises. You don't have to be an outdoor enthusiast or an avid hiker, in fact, don't even have to be outside to develop hypothermia. A few degrees means the difference between a normal core body temperature, and a temperature dangerously close to hypothermia.

This week on "Take Care," we speak with Dr. Chris McStay, chief of clinical operations in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, about hypothermia and how to avoid it.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The Syracuse University School of Law is the site of the first comprehensive veterans legal clinic in New York state. The impact of having an attorney present is incredible, especially when veterans apply for benefits or an upgrade in their military discharge, according to one of the founders of the new Veterans Legal Clinic at SU’s law school.

Chris Ford / Flickr

The legislative session is off to a subdued start, with the governor’s State of the State message delayed for two weeks. Nevertheless, fault lines are already forming over some key issues, including rent regulations and how to measure teacher performance.

Some rights reserved by Samantha Celera

A bad flu virus continues to spread through the community, as flu cases in Onondaga County are up five-fold from this time last year.

The flu is coming early and often for much of the United States, according to health officials, and central New York has not been spared.

New York's mesonet: economic implications

Jan 9, 2015
Howard Owen

Scientists at the University at Albany are developing a state-wide weather detection system called the mesonet. The network of 125 weather stations will record weather variables like temperature, wind speed, and precipitation. A study by the American Meteorological Society shows New York’s economy suffers the most from inclement weather and environmental variability. Concluding this series, we speak with a farmer whose livelihood depends on the weather.

Mike Blyth / Flickr

In the early days of the AIDS epidemic, a positive diagnosis was virtually a death sentence.  Today, a person taking antiretroviral medications can live long term with the disease as a chronic infection. Now researchers are looking into why the aging population living with HIV/AIDS is at greater risk for heart disease and stroke.

Clinical researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center will use a $3.8 million grant to investigate why people treated with antiretrovirals for HIV have higher than average rates of heart disease and stroke.

Health exchange official pleased with state sign-ups

Jan 8, 2015
Possible Health / Flickr

Traffic on the New York State of Health website is holding steady following the first deadline for open enrollment.

Donna Frescatore, executive director of the New York State of Health Benefit Exchange, is pleased with the numbers of New Yorkers signing up for health insurance on the marketplace.

New York State Health Department officials saw an increase in the numbers of enrollees in time to get covered at the start of the New Year. Frescatore says she expects more high traffic days as the next deadlines roll around.

Karen DeWitt/WRVO News

The New York State Senate and Assembly met in Albany to choose new leaders and begin outlining their plans for the 2015 session. The year begins with Republicans in full control of the state Senate, but with a group of breakaway Democrats still enjoying special status.

The State of the State has been delayed for two weeks, due to the funeral of former Gov. Mario Cuomo, the father of Gov. Andrew Cuomo. But under New York’s state’s constitution, the legislature is still required to convene.   

Connectologist / via Flickr

Newly sworn-in Rep. John Katko has already attached his name to an effort to repeal the medical device tax.

The tax on medical equipment manufactured in the United States was tacked on to the Affordable Care Act as a way to pay for the health care overhaul. But it’s angered device makers, like Welch Allyn in Skaneateles. The company attributed recent layoffs to the tax’s impact.

New York's mesonet: data and apps

Jan 8, 2015
University of Oklahoma

Scientists at University at Albany are building a $24 million weather monitoring network that will collect information across the state. In a continuing series, we explore how that information will be made available to the general public.

A little help for malt barley farmers

Jan 7, 2015
Cambridge Brewing Co.

New York farmers are diversifying their cash crops by adding malt barley to their fields.  Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY) has a plan to jumpstart the state's malt barley farming industry.

Malt barley is a temperamental little plant. It needs to be brought up in very specific conditions in order to yield a quality beer. Adverse weather can destroy entire harvests -- like this past season in places like Idaho where heavy rain took 85 percent of their crop. That's why Schumer is pushing for insurance for New York malt barley farmers.

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

At a time when police community relations are at historic lows across the country, Onondaga County lawmakers have made a move they hope will repair some of the trust between central New Yorkers and the Onondaga County Justice Center.  

There was a rare standing ovation for Onondaga County lawmakers Tuesday.

Applause followed a unanimous vote to create a jail oversight commission.  This independent group will review serious incidents at the Justice Center, and make reports to the legislature and the sheriff’s department.  

O World of Photos / via Flickr

Oneida County is using some its share in revenue from the Turning Stone casino to fund arts and science programs.

Oneida County is receiving a $2.5 million annual cut of the Turning Stone profits. That’s through a revenue sharing deal between the Oneida Indian Nation that runs the casino and New York state.

County Executive Anthony Picente has proposed using those funds for downtown development, infrastructure upgrades, public safety, and arts and science.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

Onondaga County lawmakers decided against voting on a controversial pay raise for executive and legislative positions, including an almost $40,000 pay hike for County Executive Joanie Mahoney.  

Onondaga County Legislator Jim Corl pulled the pay raise proposal off the agenda, saying that more information and data needs to be reviewed before lawmakers can proceed.  

New York's mesonet: profiling stations

Jan 7, 2015
Texas Tech University

Scientists from the University at Albany are designing the state's weather detection system to be the most sophisticated in the country. In the second part of a series, we take a look at the system’s technological advancements.

The New York State Mesonet won’t the first of its kind. UAlbany is modeling much of the network after Oklahoma’s.
 

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

Former Gov. Mario Cuomo was laid to rest in New York today after a funeral and wake that was attended by prominent politicians, including former President Bill Clinton and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and Vice President Joe Biden.

But the ceremony and the eulogy by his son, Gov. Andrew Cuomo, focused on the personal as well as the political. Cuomo called his father “the keynote speaker for our better angels.”

Stefanik adds 'additional crack in the glass ceiling'

Jan 6, 2015
Brian Mann / NCPR

Earlier today, all members of the 114th Congress were sworn in to office in Washington, D.C. Among them are newly-elected representatives, including Republicans John Katko from the Syracuse area and Elise Stefanik from the North Country.

Stefanik has received national attention as the youngest woman ever elected to the House of Representatives. And many Republicans have looked to her to be the new face of the party.

In an interview with CBS This Morning, Stefanik agreed Republicans in the past have had an image problem with women.

governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

Former Gov. Mario Cuomo will be memorialized at a funeral service in Manhattan later this morning.

Hundreds of mourners lined up for his wake yesterday. Many political leaders also attended, including Vice President Joe Biden and his wife Jill Biden, House of Representatives minority leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), and Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY).

Earlier in the day, Schumer remembered the three-term governor, who was said to have never forgotten that he was a Roman Catholic kid from Queens.

Governor Andrew Cuomo / Flickr

Education will be a big issue in 2015. Lines are already drawn between public school teachers, Gov. Andrew Cuomo, and the charter school movement.

Before the New Year even began, the state’s largest teachers union was already making its displeasure with Cuomo known, by protesting outside the governor’s mansion.

New York State United Teachers (NYSUT) President Karen Magee says teachers are angry over what they see as the governor's increasingly negative view of their union and the public education system in general.  

Brian Hoffman / via Flickr

Upstate New York is bracing for its first sting of cold winter weather this week.

Already this cold weather system has caused some school delays and closures. And high winds knocked out the power in Tompkins County on Monday. But it’s going to get a whole lot colder by the middle of the week, the National Weather Service is predicting.

"It looks like on Wednesday, we’ll be lucky to see a high of ten degrees in Syracuse," said Ray Brady, a meteorologist with the weather service.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO file photo

The orientations are over, the office space has been rented and the staff hired.  And now the real work begins for the 58 freshmen who will join the 114th session of the House of Representatives.

Among those being sworn in today, are North Country Republican Elise Stefanik, who is the youngest women ever elected to Congress and Syracuse-area Republican, John Katko. The Camillus Republican says he and Stefanik are already working together.

What is the mesonet?

Jan 6, 2015
Raymond D. Woods Jr. / Flickr

After snow buried Buffalo in November, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said the development of a state-wide weather detection system will lead to better forecasting. In the first of a four-part series, we examine what the system will and won’t deliver for New York residents.
 
The statewide network of weather monitoring stations is called the mesonet.
 

Typically, each station’s a 33-foot high tower in the middle of a clearing, equipped with all kinds of weather instrumentations like temperature gauges and wind vanes.

Katko named to chair a House subcommittee

Jan 5, 2015
Ryan Delaney / WRVO file photo

Rep.-elect John Katko has been appointed to become chairman of a subcommittee in the House of Representatives.

The Syracuse-area Republican will officially be sworn in tomorrow along with the rest of the freshman class of lawmakers. But not every newcomer to Congress gets to become a chairman.

Katko was already named to the House Homeland Security Committee, and now has been named the head of its Subcommittee on Transportation Security. The committee focuses on safety of passenger and baggage screening, surface transportation and transportation security regulations.

Auburn's First Presbyterian Church is in a dispute with city officials who say the church is operating a commercial business in a residentially zoned property.

The dispute started in July when the city cited First Presbyterian and told the church not to hold its annual summer glee camp at the church's historic Case Mansion, saying it’s a commercial enterprise being conducted in a residentially zoned area. The camp charges $100 dollars per child to help cover the costs of the program and materials.

governorandrewcuomo / via Flickr

In addition to attending his father’s funeral, Gov. Andrew Cuomo will also be preparing for a State of the State address over the next several days.

The governor had scheduled to deliver the annual speech on Jan. 7, the day the legislature returns to session, as is traditional. But the governor and legislative leaders agreed to postpone the State of the State to Jan. 21 because of the extenuating circumstances of former Gov. Mario Cuomo's death.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

The political jockeying in New York state is well underway, as special interests vie for part of an approximately $5 billion budget windfall, courtesy of settlements with the banking industry earlier this year. There’s a vocal contingent of state and local lawmakers, including Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner, who believe that money should be used to fix crumbling upstate infrastructure. But not everyone in central New York is entirely on board with this plan.  

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