News

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

As workers begin the job of demolishing much of the dated interior of the Hotel Syracuse, the historic parts of the hotel are being preserved -- including one piece of artwork that once dominated the lobby of the landmark hotel.

NYSenate.gov

In the wake of the arrest of former New York State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver on corruption charges, many legislators and the governor have floated proposals for ethics reform. Republican State Senator Joe Griffo (R-Rome) is pushing for a change he started fighting for even before this latest scandal -- term limits.

TEDx University of Nevada / Flickr

Public health” is a phrase that can be heard seemingly nonstop whenever there is a health scare or disease outbreak. The current measles outbreak is an example of this -- a public health issue that makes headlines for days, weeks or months at a time.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Leana Wen discusses that public health is actually an everyday affair -- one that needs to receive more attention -- to better prevent and resolve such outbreaks. Wen is a Harvard-educated emergency physician, the Baltimore City health commissioner and co-author of the book “When Doctors Don’t Listen: How to Avoid Misdiagnoses and Unnecessary Tests.”

How adjustments in diet can reduce inflammation

Feb 22, 2015
Wikimedia Commons

Inflammation can be a reaction to an injury or infection where the body reddens and swells. It’s sometimes painful and can also be a sign that the body is ready to begin the healing process. But, chronic inflammation is a cause for concern and even has ties to heart disease.

This week on “Take Care,” health expert Johannah Sakimura discusses foods that are high in anti-inflammatory compounds. Sakimura writes the Nutrition Sleuth column at Everyday Health. She has a master’s degree in nutrition from the Columbia University Institute of Human Nutrition.

Most public school teachers are feeling embattled these days, with public criticisms of their effectiveness and calls for tougher evaluations and promotion criteria.  At the same time, public schools in poorer districts are being asked to do more and more to help address the broader social and economic problems manifesting themselves among school populations.  How are teachers experiencing these challenges?  This week on the Campbell Conversations, host Grant Reeher speaks with Kevin Ahern, a product of the Syracuse City school system, a longtime English teacher in the system, and currently President of the Syracuse Teachers Association.

Karen DeWitt / WRVO News

State Assembly Majority Leader Joe Morelle says real ethics reform is coming to Albany.

Morelle, a Rochester-area Democrat wouldn’t say whether he thinks former Speaker Sheldon Silver is guilty of a crime. But Morelle said that Silver should have been forced to disclose the source of his outside income.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

It was graduation day for a group of recruits from the Syracuse Police Academy.

Fifty-seven men and women were given their badges during a ceremony at the Palace Theater. Among them is Dan Medlock, who is joining the Syracuse Police Department. He says all the scrutiny police officers have been given in recent months was on his mind during the training.

Office of Emergency and Public Health Preparedness / Flickr

After the recent measles outbreak, citizens, medical professionals, advocacy groups and government entities were all talking about "public health." But public health is an ongoing issue -- one that requires more attention. That's according to Dr. Leana Wen, Baltimore City's health commissioner. This week on "Take Care," hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. Wen about the importance of public health.

Cuomo encourages snowmobilers to visit the Tug Hill

Feb 20, 2015
governorandrewcuomo / Flickr

Governor Andrew Cuomo has waived the registration fee for out of state snowmobiles during the weekend of March 7th. Cuomo made the announcement in Lowville Thursday before heading out on a snowmobile tour through the Tug Hill.

theweathernetwork.com

Friday morning update: The windy conditions over the past 24 hours has broken the ice up quite a bit. George Leshkevich is a physical scientist with the Great Lakes Environmental Laboratory now says the ice coverage is at about 56%, a 24% drop over the last day or so.

Our original post

Satellite images are showing that more than 82 percent of Lake Ontario is now frozen over. By comparison, 61 percent of the lake's surface was frozen in the first week of March last year.

SU professional and technical writing / via Flickr

Syracuse residents packed Syracuse’s city hall last night to voice their opposition to proposed service reductions on the public bus system. Councilors summoned the head of the Centro bus service to explain the transit agency’s gaping fiscal accounts. 

The council chamber at city hall was packed on a freezing and snowy evening. A testament, many said, to the importance of Centro bus service to city residents. 

azipaybarah / Flickr

Former State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver was indicted Thursday on federal fraud and extortion charges. Silver was arrested in January and charged with taking nearly $4 million in kickbacks. 

One hundred-fifty Syracuse homeowners are being spared by the federal government from having to buy flood insurance.

City officials and Sen. Charles Schumer encouraged the Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, to re-examine measurements of Onondaga Creek. Wednesday, Schumer and Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner announced the maps will be revised and include fewer homes.

Watertown, NY official website

An audit released Tuesday by the State Comptroller Thomas Dinapoli found the Watertown police department lost track of confiscated drugs, weapons, and two vehicles.

The report indicated the actual location of these items did not match up with inventory records. Forty-four drug items such as bags of marijuana, pills, and cocaine, were missing. Only nine have been accounted for. Most of the seized drugs in inventory did not have proper documentation.

Matt Richmond / WSKG News

The future of the Cayuga coal-fired power plant in Tompkins County remains up-in-the-air, almost three years after plans to close the plant were announced.

The local utility, NYSEG, opposes a proposed conversion to natural gas and wants to invest in their transmission system instead. Either way, the cost will be added to ratepayers’ bills.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

Local law enforcement and Sen. Charles Schumer are pushing for more disclosure about homes that were previously used as meth labs.

Schumer, a Democrat, wants there to be a law on the books that requires someone selling a home to let the buyer know if the home has ever been used as a meth lab – assuming it was busted for being so.

"Knowing if your home was the site of a former meth lab before you purchase it, before you’re forced to deal with the health consequences and the cost of cleanup is critical," he said.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

Onondaga County’s top public prosecutor isn’t entirely on board with some proposals to make the grand jury process more transparent.

New York's chief judge has proposed that records of now secret grand jury proceedings be released when nobody is charged. He’s also called for direct judicial oversight when police are investigated for killings or felony assaults.

Trial could lead to an oral vaccine against HIV

Feb 19, 2015
Mike Blyth / Flickr

 

University of Rochester Medical Center researchers in Rochester are looking for healthy adults for a trial that could lead to an oral vaccine against HIV infection.

The vaccine under investigation comes in pill form.

“Our goal is to eradicate it from the world, much like we've almost done with polio and have done with small pox,” said Doctor Michael Keefer, director of the University’s HIV Vaccine Trials Unit.

  It’s made of live adenovirus -- a protein that creates an immune response against HIV.

Constellation Energy Group

An Oswego County nuclear plant was shut down Wednesday, after water levels in the reactor increased. The Nine Mile Point Unit 2 reactor was shut down just after 2 p.m. Wednesday. 

According to a spokeswoman with Constellation Energy, which owns the plant, water levels have returned to normal. The plant remains offline while technicians look for the cause of the problem. 

The Nine Mile Unit 1 reactor was not affected and continues to operate at 100 percent power. 

Mercy Health / Flickr

  The deadline to enroll for coverage through the state’s health insurance plan was Sunday. New Yorkers who started applications before the cutoff still have until the end of the month to finish them.
 

But state health officials are also considering adding a special enrollment period for people who have not yet filed their 2014 tax return. Consumer advocacy groups are asking for just that as many Americans file returns and see that they may owe money on their federal taxes.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

A federal judge this week blocked two executive actions by President Obama, that would have protected as many as 4 million immigrants in the country illegally from deportation. U.S. District Court Judge Andrew Hanen said the president overstepped his authority. 

Central New York Congressman John Katko agrees with the judge's ruling. 

Vernon Dutton / Flickr

 

The American Nurses Association reports 8 out of 10 nurses say they frequently work with joint or back pain. The nursing profession has the highest rate of on-the-job injuries of any other in the country. According to many the solution to both problems: more nurses on staff at hospitals.

"The nurses, in many ways, are the last line of defense against harm to patients," John James, founder of Patient Safety America. His organization campaigns to lower the number of injuries to patients in the hospital.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

Rep. John Katko will focus this term in office on mental health, security and poverty.

The first-term Syracuse area congressman told reporters what he wants to spend his time on. Those points range from promoting tourism to protecting the area’s agricultural sector.

Katko, R-Camillus, spoke in depth about improving Syracuse’s high poverty rate. He says in his position, he’ll look to be an advocate for decreasing unemployment and school dropout rates. "And there’s no easy answers, but raising the awareness is a start of trying to get a solution to the problem," he said.

Chris Caya / WBFO News

Buffalo's status as the "Queen City" of the Great Lakes started slipping with the St. Lawrence Seaway's opening in 1954. But after a recent meeting downtown with Seaway Administrator Betty Sutton, Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul said the state is resetting the relationship.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO

Following a trend for downtown Syracuse real estate, an office building is being renovated to have residential space, but with a twist. 

The building at the corner of Jefferson and Warren Streets is transforming into a communal space, with room for both co-working and co-living, making it perhaps the most different addition to the neighborhood’s residential construction boom.

Troy Evans is converting two floors of empty office space into co-living space, where tenants will rent small rooms with individual bathrooms.

Brian Hoffman / via Flickr

Watertown was the coldest place in the lower 48 states yesterday, reaching -36 degrees on President’s Day morning. 

But around lunch time it had warmed up to a balmy -3 degrees.  It’s the kind of temperature that car engines hate. Still, people were driving around in their cars. But a few brave souls were out on foot.

J. Stephen Conn / Flickr

Once the President’s Day week-long break is finished, Gov. Andrew Cuomo and the legislature will have to start discussing the 2015 budget.  But the traditional style of budget making in New York, known as “Three Men in a Room,” is coming under criticism, by among others, the U.S. Attorney currently investigating corruption at the Capitol. Some are wondering whether it’s time to end the secretive practice.

Ryan Delaney / WRVO file photo

There’s a big chunk of state funding on the table for investment in upstate New York’s communities and not surprising, there are a lot of opinions for what the funds should be spent on.

Rob Simpson is in charge of CenterState CEO. His organization represents 2,000 regional businesses. In the role, he’s close with both New York’s governor and local leaders.

The dangers of having a sweet tooth

Feb 15, 2015
Judy van der Velden / via Flickr

Sugar is in a lot of the foods you consume every day, but not all sugar is created equal. Whether it’s refined, naturally occurring, or added – sugar should be eaten sparingly, according to this week’s guest, because addiction to sugar is very real and very possible. And it’s not just the addition to sugar that’s a problem, it’s the damage it can do to your body.

This week on “Take Care,” James DiNicolantonio explains what causes sugar addiction and helps us differentiate healthy and harmful sugars. DiNicolantonio is a cardiovascular research scientist at Saint Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute in Kansas City, Missouri.

There’s fungus among us and a pedicure won’t fix it

Feb 15, 2015
jima / Flickr

Fungus of the nail, while virtually painless, can often stick out like a sore thumb. Embarrassing discoloration isn’t the only downside of fungus -- if left untreated, that fungus can spread and destroy the nail.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Dana Stern discusses how fungal infections are formed and how to treat them. Stern is a dermatologist, nail specialist and assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. 

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