7:01pm

Sun July 27, 2014
Health

Planning for the worst with medical directives

Marc Gutierrez Flickr

Although we may like to think that we will always have control of our lives, there may come a time when we are incapable of making sound decisions for our health.  Determining the best way to deal with those situations is difficult, but thanks to advances in medical ethics it may be a little easier.

This week on “Take Care,” Dr. Barron Lerner talks about the different kinds of medical directives and how they can help make an illness-related death easier on the patient’s caregivers. Lerner is an author and professor of medicine at New York University.  His most recent book is "The Good Doctor: A Father, a Son and the Evolution of Medical Ethics."

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Dr. Lerner.

Read more

7:00pm

Sun July 27, 2014
Health

Becoming a quality 'qualitarian'

I-5 Design and Manufacture Flickr

Using a list for grocery shopping can be helpful for remembering which food items to purchase, but is your list optimized for your health? 

This week on “Take Care,” Ashley Koff talks about the importance of selecting and incorporating quality foods into your diet.  Koff is a registered dietician and creator of the website ashleykoffapproved.com, which provides viewers with a comprehensive and thorough guide to quality eating.

Click "Read More" to hear our interview with Ashley Koff.

Read more

5:17pm

Sun July 27, 2014
Men In America

Lessons In Manhood: A Boys' School Turns Work Into Wonders

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 7:22 pm

At East Bay School for Boys, sometimes the sparks of inspiration result in, well, actual sparks.
Courtesy East Bay School for Boys

This summer, All Things Considered has been taking a look at the changing lives of men in America. And that means talking about how the country educates boys.

In Berkeley, Calif., a private, non-profit middle school called the East Bay School for Boys is trying to reimagine what it means to build confident young men. In some ways, the school's different approach starts with directing, not stifling, boys' frenetic energy.

Read more

5:14pm

Sun July 27, 2014
Author Interviews

'Love And Drowning' In The U.S. Virgin Islands

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 6:43 pm

The Land of Love And Drowning follows a family living in the U.S. Virgin Islands in the early 20th century.
Brennan Linsley AP

In the new novel Land of Love and Drowning, the Virgin Islands and the ocean around them make for a magical setting.

The book follows three generations of one family living through the modern history of the territory as it passes from Danish to American hands.

It's also laced with magical realism: One main character can sense people's arrival; another family only gives birth to men, generation after generation; and one woman has a hoofed leg instead of one of her feet.

Read more

5:14pm

Sun July 27, 2014
Around the Nation

Handmade Signs From Homeless People Lead To Art, Understanding

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 6:52 pm

Artist Willie Baronet has been collecting signs from the homeless since 1993.
Tanya Conovaloff

Artist Willie Baronet is on a 24-city, 31-day trek from Seattle, Wash. to New York City looking for supplies.

He's been buying handmade signs from homeless people for an art project called We Are All Homeless. Those signs are little more than a peripheral blur for many people. Baronet wants us to slow down, read them and understand.

"It really started because of my discomfort, my guilt, the way I felt, whenever I encountered a homeless person on the corner," he tells NPR's Eric Westervelt.

Read more

5:14pm

Sun July 27, 2014
Middle East

On The Eve Of Ramadan's End, Fighting Resumes In Gaza

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

5:14pm

Sun July 27, 2014
Middle East

What Makes This Fight In Gaza Different From The Others?

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 6:52 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

5:14pm

Sun July 27, 2014
Iraq

Violence Spikes Anew In Iraq, As Islamic State Looks To Expand

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 7:23 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

3:08pm

Sun July 27, 2014
Law

With Judges Overriding Death Penalty Cases, Alabama Is An Outlier

Courtney Lockhart is appealing a death penalty sentence that a judge gave him in 2011, which overrode the jury's recommendation of life in prison.
Dave Martin AP

When Courtney Lockhart was tried for murder in Alabama, the jury unanimously recommended a life sentence, but the judge overrode that recommendation and sentenced Lockhart to death instead. Now the convicted murderer is asking the state Supreme Court to examine Alabama's unique process of judicial override.

Alabama is an outlier. It's the only state in which judges routinely override jury decisions not to impose the death penalty.

Read more

2:08pm

Sun July 27, 2014
The Two-Way

Vincenzo Nibali First Italian In 15 Years To Win Tour De France

Italy's Vincenzo Nibali, wearing the overall leader's yellow jersey, passes the Arc de Triomphe during the twenty-first and last stage of the Tour de France cycling race over 85.4 miles with start in Evry and finish in Paris, France.
Christophe Ena AP

Vincenzo Nibali has officially won this year's Tour de France, becoming the first Italian cyclist to do so since 1998 with a ride past fans lining Paris' Champs-Elysees.

As we reported on Saturday, Nibali, riding for Astana Pro Team, had worn the yellow jersey through most of the three-week competition that had been marked by bad weather and the relatively quick elimination of some of the favorites.

On an overcast Sunday in the French capital, Nibali rode past the Arc de Triomphe on his way to the winner's podium.

Read more

Pages