12:32pm

Tue October 9, 2012
Commentary

One Debate, Two Very Different Conversations

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 2:13 pm

President Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney finish their debate at the University of Denver on Oct. 3.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

When you consider how carefully staged and planned the debates are and how long they've been around, it's remarkable how often candidates manage to screw them up. Sometimes they're undone by a simple gaffe or an ill-conceived bit of stagecraft, like Gerald Ford's slip-up about Soviet domination of eastern Europe in 1976, or Al Gore's histrionic sighing in 2000. Sometimes it's just a sign of a candidate having a bad day, like Ronald Reagan's woolly ramblings in the first debate with Walter Mondale in 1984.

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12:31pm

Tue October 9, 2012
The Two-Way

VIDEO: Australia's Prime Minister Doesn't Hold Back As She Rips Opponent

Originally published on Wed October 10, 2012 7:59 am

Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard delivering her verbal takedown of the opposition.
ABCNews (of Australia)

12:06pm

Tue October 9, 2012
Your Money

How To Avoid Sticky Financial Situations

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 12:34 pm

Writer Sybilla Nash agreed to help out a friend by co-signing a mortgage. But after her friend neglected to make payments, Nash's credit score dropped 200 points. Nash wrote about the ordeal for The Huffington Post. She joins host Michel Martin and consumer education expert John Ulzheimer to talk about how to avoid sticky financial situations.

12:02pm

Tue October 9, 2012
Music

'Hotstix' Inspired By Liberation Music Of Youth

For Tell Me More's occasional series "In Your Ear," guests of the program talk about songs that have particular meaning for them. South African musician Sipho "Hotstix" Mabuse went back to school at the age of 60. He shares the songs that have inspired him over the years.

12:02pm

Tue October 9, 2012
Law

What Another Look At Affirmative Action Will Mean

Affirmative action is back before the U.S. Supreme Court. On Wednesday, the justices hear arguments in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin. Abigail Fisher says she was denied admission to the school four years ago because she's white. Host Michel Martin discusses the upcoming arguments with Associated Press reporter Justin Pope.

12:02pm

Tue October 9, 2012
Education

Florida, Microcosm of Nation's Schools

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, we'll talk to a woman about the high price of friendship. Well, one friendship anyway. She cosigned a loan for a friend who was struggling. Now she is struggling with the consequences. We'll have more on that and we'll also tell you some things you might want to think about to protect your own credit score. That's in just a few minutes.

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11:25am

Tue October 9, 2012
U.S.

Sandusky Sentenced For Penn State Assaults

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And here's another story we've been following throughout the morning: Jerry Sandusky was sentenced today to at least 30 years in prison. The former Penn State assistant football coach was convicted in June, of sexually abusing 10 boys. NPR's Jeff Brady was in the Pennsylvania courtroom today. He joins us now. Jeff, what's the sentence? More details.

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11:11am

Tue October 9, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Debate Heats Up About Contentious Bird Flu Research

When a case of the potentially lethal H5N1 bird flu was found in British poultry in 2007, Dutch farmers were told to keep their poultry away from wild birds by closing off outdoor areas with wire mesh.
Ed Oudenaarden AFP/Getty Images

What was supposed to be a 60-day moratorium on certain experiments involving lab-altered bird flu has now lasted more than eight months. And there's no clear end in sight.

Researchers still disagree on how to best manage the risks posed by mutant forms of highly pathogenic H5N1 bird flu. The altered viruses are contagious between ferrets, which are the lab stand-in for humans. The fear is that these germs could potentially cause a deadly flu pandemic in people if they ever escaped the lab.

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11:00am

Tue October 9, 2012
-Nature of Things

Dedications and Spectacles in Nature

John Weeks talks about the parallel between the operation of a wild thing and the function of a computer chip. Weeks makes the point that in both cases, a lot of what happens may be the result of stored messages or directives, as in the case of bird migration.

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10:27am

Tue October 9, 2012
The Two-Way

NPR Names New Executive Editor

Madhulika Sikka.
Doby Photography NPR

Madhulika Sikka, who has been Morning Edition's executive producer since joining NPR six years ago, will become the organization's executive editor in January.

In announcing the promotion this morning, NPR Senior Vice President for News Margaret Low Smith lauded Sikka's work at Morning Edition, saying she "brought real vision" to the show and that it has "evolved into a more interesting and relevant program" under her leadership.

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