3:19pm

Fri August 3, 2012
Author Interviews

Living The 'Cat Life' In Brazil

Originally published on Tue August 21, 2012 9:39 am

Author Clarah Averbuck says Brazil has a long way to go in its treatment of women.
Paula Ragucci Courtesy Clarah Averbuck

Camila, the leading lady in Cat Life by Brazilian author Clarah Averbuck, may spend nearly 90 pages pining over the love of her life, Antonio, but that doesn't make her weak.

Averbuck says her heroine is somewhat based on her own life experience. "I fell in love, I was young. ... You know, the first time you realize [it's] not going to work the way you think it's going to work, you get all crushed," she tells Michel Martin, host of NPR's Tell Me More.

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3:13pm

Fri August 3, 2012
The Two-Way

Experts Find Ancient Mayans May Have Used Chocolate As Condiment

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 3:38 pm

Chocolate.
Philippe Huguen AFP/Getty Images

Archaeologists have made a surprising discovery: They announced they found traces of 2,500-year-old chocolate on a plate as opposed to a cup.

The conclusion they make is that it means ancient Mayans not only drank chocolate but also used it as a condiment.

The AP reports the discovery was made public by Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History.

The AP adds:

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3:03pm

Fri August 3, 2012
The Salt

If Almonds Bring You Joy, Enjoy More For Fewer Calories

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 11:10 am

Almonds may have 20 percent less calories than previously thought.
iStockphoto.com

Scientists are starting to discover that the standard way of measuring calories, established more than 100 years ago, may not be terribly accurate when it comes to higher fat, high-fiber foods like nuts. But when it comes to almonds, the count may be off by a whole lot.

Food scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture recently published a new study that finds almonds have about 20 percent fewer calories than previously documented.

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2:51pm

Fri August 3, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

More Cases Of New Swine Flu Virus Appear In Three States

Colton Tucker gives water to a pig to be shown at the California State Fair in Sacramento in July. Federal health officials say most of the cases of a new flu virus in Indiana, Ohio and Hawaii after kids came in direct contact with pigs at agricultural fairs.
Rich Pedroncelli AP

Federal health officials Friday reported a jump this summer in the number of people who have gotten infected with a new swine flu virus.

Sixteen cases of the new H3N2 swine flu have been confirmed in the last few weeks, including 12 in the last week alone, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.

Ten of last week's cases occurred in Ohio, while the two others were in Indiana and Hawaii.

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2:31pm

Fri August 3, 2012
The Two-Way

'Entire World' Has Responded To The $500 Tip 'Last Wish,' Brother Says

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 6:06 pm

Aaron Collins, who wanted to leave a big tip.
Facebook.com/AaronsLastWish
  • Seth Collins on the outpouring of support
  • Seth Collins on what Aaron would think

The positive reaction to "Aaron's Wish" — a young Kentucky man's request that after he died his family give some lucky waiter or waitress an "awesome" tip of at least $500 — continues.

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2:29pm

Fri August 3, 2012
Environment

Changing Views About A Changing Climate

What is the role of humans in climate change? "Call me a converted skeptic," physicist Richard Muller wrote in an Op-Ed in the New York Times this week, describing his analysis of data from the Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature project. Though Muller was once a notable skeptic regarding studies connecting human activity to climate change, he has now concluded that "humans are almost entirely the cause" of global warming.

1:44pm

Fri August 3, 2012
Technology

Tech Giants Gear Up For Patent Battle

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 2:29 pm

A court battle between Apple and Samsung is underway in California, with each side arguing over intricate patent and trademark claims covering how the companies' phones and tablets work, look, and feel. Robin Feldman, professor at the UC Hastings College of the Law, explains some of the key issues in the court case and how it might affect the technology industry.

1:34pm

Fri August 3, 2012
Space

Planning For 'Curiosity' On Mars

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 2:29 pm

If all goes according to plan, the Mars Science Laboratory rover, nicknamed 'Curiosity,' will touch down on the red planet this weekend following what NASA has called 'seven minutes of terror' during the descent. NPR science correspondent Joe Palca and John Grunsfeld, head of NASA's Science Directorate, give a preview of the mission and talk about what scientists hope to learn from the latest ambassador to Mars.

1:33pm

Fri August 3, 2012
The Torch

Going To The Games: A Spectator's View Of The London Olympics

Tickets to London 2012 events come with a travel pass.
Madhulika Sikka NPR

To find out what the London Olympics are like for the average fan, we asked Morning Edition executive producer Madhulika Sikka — a Brit who's vacationing in London — to describe it for us. Sikka received tickets through the lottery.

Congratulations, you've secured tickets for an Olympic event, and London 2012 awaits you. So, what's it like to navigate a city that has been bracing itself for the throng of Olympic visitors?

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1:28pm

Fri August 3, 2012
NPR Story

Spending The Holidays At A Toxic Waste Site

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 2:29 pm

To avoid the crowds at Niagara Falls, why not sail the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, or ogle oil refineries in Port Arthur, Texas? In Visit Sunny Chernobyl: And Other Adventures In The World's Most Polluted Places, Andrew Blackwell describes traveling to the world's most contaminated destinations.

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