3:04am

Fri May 4, 2012
Planet Money

Food Trucks Seek 'That Mystical Spot'

Originally published on Mon May 7, 2012 2:55 pm

Lam Thuy Vo NPR

The Rickshaw Dumpling Truck is a retired postal van, painted red and filled with Chinese dumplings. I'm riding shotgun with Kenny Lao, the van's co-owner. It's a weekday morning, and we're driving into Manhattan looking for a killer spot to set up shop for the day.

"I think there is that mystical spot in midtown that every truck owner dreams of," Lao says. "Easy parking. It's a wide sidewalk. There's no restaurant but there's lots of offices."

There are 3,000 year-round food trucks and carts competing for that mystical spot. And no one has an official place to park.

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3:03am

Fri May 4, 2012
StoryCorps

Remembering A Grandfather's 'Best Gift'

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 9:57 am

Vicente Domingo Villa grew up on the ranches of South Texas.
StoryCorps

Ricardo Isaias Zavala comes from a long line of vaqueros — cowboys who worked the ranches of Southeast Texas in the 19th and 20th centuries. That tradition stopped with his grandfather — but in the Zavala family, parts of it live on.

Ricardo's grandfather's name was Vicente Domingo Villa. His family moved from ranch to ranch, looking for work. Most of the ranches were in the scrubland of South Texas, east of Laredo.

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3:02am

Fri May 4, 2012
Education

For College Seniors, One Last Lap Before Graduation

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 9:57 am

The pool at Bryn Mawr College's Bern Schwartz Fitness and Athletic Center. Bryn Mawr is one of a handful of colleges that requires students to pass a swimming test to graduate.
Courtesy of Bryn Mawr College

It's spring, the season when many college students are cramming for final exams. But it's also when some college seniors must prove they can literally stay afloat.

A swim test is still a graduation requirement on a handful of U.S. campuses, mostly in the Northeast. For seniors who have been putting off the exam, it's time to sink or swim.

A Shrinking Tradition

On a recent evening, a handful of seniors at Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, Pa., gather nervously at the edge of the campus pool, waiting to take the last swim test of the school year.

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3:00am

Fri May 4, 2012
National Security

Potential Torture Testimony Could Rattle Sept. 11 Case

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 12:02 pm

A picture posted on the website www.muslm.net in 2009 allegedly shows al-Qaida's Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, who has claimed to be the mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks, at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp.
AFP/Getty Images

The man who claims to have orchestrated the Sept. 11 attacks is expected to appear in a military courtroom this Saturday. Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and four other men are supposed to answer formal charges related to their roles in the plot.

Their arraignment will be at Guantanamo Bay, and it is the first step that leads — possibly years from now — to a military trial.

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7:52pm

Thu May 3, 2012
The Two-Way

Medical Examiner Rules Junior Seau's Death A Suicide

Originally published on Thu May 3, 2012 8:13 pm

Junior Seau in 2009, when he played with the New England Patriots.
Elsa Getty Images

The San Diego County medical examiner's office has confirmed Junior Seau's death was a suicide, The Associated Press reports. As we reported this morning, signs pointed to suicide, but the former NFL player did not leave a note or other obvious clues.

Seau died Wednesday of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the chest, the AP says.

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6:19pm

Thu May 3, 2012
It's All Politics

Political Scientist Asks: Are Obama's Approval Ratings Better Than They Seem?

President Obama's voter-approval ratings certainly have been far from spectacular for much of his presidency, remaining mostly below 50 percent since November of 2009.

But on that dimension he may actually be doing better than it appears, at least based on some statistical modeling of presidential approval ratings conducted by George Washington University political scientist John Sides.

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6:06pm

Thu May 3, 2012
-From The Soil with Sollecito

Make a View Space

For centuries the Japanese practice of shakkei has enlived landscapes by framing what is already there.  The idea is to 'borrow from the scenery around you.'  Why build it if it the space around you is already a breathtaking masterpiece?  Words of wisdom from the master landscaper on how to make the most of your space, whatever the condition of your surroundings.

5:55pm

Thu May 3, 2012
Africa

Diplomats Up Efforts To Avert War Between Sudans

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 10:43 am

Sudanese soldiers walk in the oil town of Heglig on April 24. South Sudanese forces occupied Heglig last month. The international community called on the South to pull out, which it says it did.
Ebrahim Hamid AFp/Getty Images

Sudan and South Sudan are facing the threat of United Nations sanctions if they fail to stop fighting along their disputed frontier in the Horn of Africa.

A unanimous U.N. Security Council resolution, which condemns the surge of border violence, orders the two Sudans to cease hostilities within two days and resume negotiations within two weeks.

The U.N. resolution endorses an African Union road map it hopes will avert a return to war.

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5:37pm

Thu May 3, 2012
Planet Money

What American Women Do For Work

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 6:09 pm

Lam Thuy Vo / NPR

Forty years ago, only 1 in 3 American workers was a woman. Today, it's 1 in 2.

You know this already. But it raises interesting, subtler questions: What jobs did all those women get? And how did the gender breakdown change by industry over the past 40 years?

This graph answers those questions.

It shows how the gender breakdown changed in major sectors of the economy between 1972 and 2012.

The size of the circles shows how some sectors grew to include a larger share of the workforce, while others shrank in relative terms.

Two main themes jump out here.

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Terry Gildea comes to KUER from San Antonio where he spent four years as a reporter and host at Texas Public Radio. While at KSTX, he created, produced and hosted the station's first local talk show, The Source. He covered San Antonio's military community for the station and for NPR's Impact of War Project. Terry's features on wounded warriors, families on the home front and veterans navigating life after war have aired on Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and All Things Considered. His half-hour radio documentary exploring the burn unit at Brooke Army Medical Center was honored by the Houston Press and the Texas Associated Press Broadcasters.

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