3:39pm

Wed April 11, 2012
The Salt

Fishermen Net Gold In Silvery Eels Sold To Asia

A fisherman uses a lantern while dip-netting for elvers on a river in southern Maine. Elvers are young, translucent eels that are born in the Sargasso Sea and swim to freshwater lakes and ponds, where they grow to adults before returning to the sea.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

There's a gold rush under way on the East Coast of the U.S. for tiny baby eels known as elvers. Fishermen in Maine and South Carolina are reaping profits upward of $2,000 per pound for the fish that are considered a delicacy in Japan.

Elvers have an almost ghostly appearance in the water — their bodies are a cloudy white, skinny as a cocktail straw and no longer than your finger. They look like tiny snakes as they squiggle through the water.

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3:28pm

Wed April 11, 2012
Sports

Five-Time Olympic Archer Giving It One More Shot

Butch Johnson competes in the 2010 U.S. National Target Championships in Hamilton, Ohio. Johnson is trying for his sixth Olympic Games this summer. When not competing, he manages an archery range in Connecticut. He keeps his Olympic medals under the kitchen sink.
Teresa Iaconi Courtesy of USA Archery

3:14pm

Wed April 11, 2012
The Two-Way

No Parole For Charles Manson; Bid May Be His Last

A photo provided by the California Department of Corrections shows killer Charles Manson, 77, on April 4, 2012.
AP

Convicted murderer Charles Manson, sentenced to life in prison for his role in the grisly deaths of seven people in 1969, will not be released from prison, California's parole board decided Wednesday. The hearing, which Manson did not attend, may have been the 77-year-old's last chance at freedom. His next bid for a parole hearing isn't likely to be heard until 2027.

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3:08pm

Wed April 11, 2012
Energy

Quakes Caused By Waste From Gas Wells, Study Finds

A water truck heads up Colorado Road 215 along Parachute Creek. Water is key to extracting natural gas from deep underground.
David Gilkey NPR

The U.S. Geological Survey will soon confirm that the oil and gas industry is creating earthquakes, and new data from the Midwest finds that these man-made quakes are happening more often than originally thought.

Earthquakes happen when faults in the Earth slip and slide against each other. There's continuous stress on innumerable faults on our continent, but seismologists like Bill Ellsworth, from the U.S. Geological Survey, started seeing something odd about 12 years ago.

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3:00pm

Wed April 11, 2012
The Two-Way

Zimmerman Is Reportedly Arrested; Prosecutor Has 'New Information'

Originally published on Wed April 11, 2012 6:20 pm

George Zimmerman, in a 2005 mug shot provided by the Orange County (Fla.) jail, via The Miami Herald. He was arrested that year for an incident involving a dispute with a local alcohol control official.
AP

Florida state attorney Angela Corey, who is acting as a special prosecutor in the high-profile shooting death of teenager Trayvon Martin, has scheduled a 6 p.m. ET news conference to "release new information" regarding the case, her office just announced.

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Dan Charles is NPR's food and agriculture correspondent.

Primarily responsible for covering farming and the food industry, Charles focuses on the stories of culture, business, and the science behind what arrives on your dinner plate.

This is his second time working for NPR; from 1993 to 1999, Charles was a technology correspondent at NPR. He returned in 2011.

2:24pm

Wed April 11, 2012
The Salt

FDA Launches Voluntary Plan To Reduce Use Of Antibiotics In Animals

Originally published on Thu April 12, 2012 6:38 am

The FDA's latest effort to end the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in animals is getting mixed reviews from activists.
Rob Carr AP

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said today it is calling on the nation's pork, beef, and poultry producers to reduce their use of antibiotics. But some watchdog groups say this voluntary guidance doesn't go nearly far enough.

The issue has been contentious for decades. Just last month, a federal judge ruled that the FDA had to go ahead with a plan it proposed in 1977 that would ban the use of some antibiotics as a growth promoter in animals.

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2:15pm

Wed April 11, 2012
The Two-Way

VIDEO: Texting Guy Barely Escapes Bumping Into Bear

As the bear turned right, Vaz Terdandenyan was about to come down the sidewalk toward it. He got a surprise.
KTLA-TV

If this doesn't make you want to put down that cellphone, we don't know what will.

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2:14pm

Wed April 11, 2012

2:14pm

Wed April 11, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Ark. Judge Socks Johnson & Johnson With $1.1 Billion Penalty

A state judge in Arkansas ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay a $1.1 billion fine after a jury found the company had minimized the risks of its antipsychotic drug Risperdal.

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