4:29pm

Sun February 26, 2012
Presidential Race

Energy Fuels Newt Gingrich's Comeback Plan

Republican candidate Newt Gingrich is counting on his promise of $2.50-per-gallon gas to return him to front-runner status.
Evan Vucci AP

3:57pm

Sun February 26, 2012
U.S.

What Happens If The Keystone XL Pipeline Isn't Built?

Originally published on Mon February 27, 2012 7:56 am

A mock oil pipeline near Cushing, Okla.
Brent Baughman/NPR

Part two of a two-part series on the Keystone XL pipeline

Gas isn't like a rare bottle of wine that fetches a high price just because it's rare. But at the same time, no one can agree what drives gas prices. Demand for gasoline in the U.S. is at its lowest point in more than a decade; domestic oil production is at an eight-year high.

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3:03pm

Sun February 26, 2012
Author Interviews

How Sugar Brought An End to Hawaii's Nationhood

Originally published on Mon February 27, 2012 7:40 am

iStockphoto.com

If you've seen a Hawaiian tourism commercial, a beach movie, or even a cartoon with Daffy Duck in a lei and a grass skirt, you've heard the poignant strains of "Aloha Oe."

But the tune has a history stretching far beyond cartoons and commercials: It was composed in 1878 by the woman who would become the last queen of Hawaii, Lili'uokalani.

Hawaii is the only state to have once been an independent monarchy. And when Lili'u, as she called herself, was born in 1838, it was at its height.

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11:38am

Sun February 26, 2012
Sports

Money Ends College Sport's Oldest Rivalries

The Kansas Jayhawks staged a dramatic comeback Saturday to defeat the Missouri Tigers 87-86. Never mind the exciting finish; this may the last time these two teams ever meet.

And it's not the only feud ending this season. College sports has now bid farewell to three of its very oldest rivalries.

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11:36am

Sun February 26, 2012
Politics and Government

Buerkle's re-election bid gets underway amid protests

Shoes left by protestors sat in the snow outside Rep. Buerkle's campaign headquarters in Syracuse on Saturday. Protestors briefly tried to get inside the event, but were denied.
Ryan Delaney WRVO

U.S. Representative Ann Marie Buerkle will run for a second term in congress, but the day she made that official was marked with protest.

Staffers for the representative got in a brief scuffle with demonstrators at the event to kick-off the re-election campaign.

It became the buzz inside her christened campaign office on Erie Boulevard in Syracuse as dozens of supporters awaited her arrival Saturday afternoon.

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8:00am

Sun February 26, 2012
Africa

Vote In Senegal Threatens Democratic Reputation

Originally published on Wed February 29, 2012 11:20 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. In West Africa, the people of Senegal are voting for their new president today after days of violent street protests. The sitting president, 85-year-old Abdoulaye Wade, has been in power for 12 years, and he is seeking a third term in office. His opposition rivals say that's illegal, and they insist the president must go now.

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8:00am

Sun February 26, 2012
Middle East

NGOs On Trial In Egypt

Originally published on Wed February 29, 2012 11:20 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We're going to shift our focus to Egypt now, where the trial of 43 NGO workers has been adjourned until April. The Egyptian government has accused them of operating in the country illegally and spurring unrest. Many of those charged are American, including the son of U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood.

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8:00am

Sun February 26, 2012
Media

A Brighter Future For Murdoch With 'Sunday Sun'?

The de facto replacement for The News of the World, The Sunday Sun, will premiere its first issue Sunday. Host Rachel Martin talks with Ray Snoddy, a British journalist, about what this means for Rupert Murdoch's media empire.

8:00am

Sun February 26, 2012
Middle East

Syria: On The Brink Of Civil War?

Originally published on Wed February 29, 2012 11:20 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

For a closer look at the chaos in Syria, we turn now to Jon Lee Anderson. He's a reporter for The New Yorker magazine, and last month he spent time in Syria, reporting on the rapidly devolving situation there.

We reached him at his home in England, and he told us about one moment that has stayed with him - his visit to a place called Clocktower Square, in Homs, the site of intense clashes over the past year.

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8:00am

Sun February 26, 2012
World

Ahead Of Vote, A Look Back At Russia's Changes

Host Rachel Martin talks to veteran Russian journalist Vladimir Pozner from Moscow about how Russia has changed since the days of glasnost and perestroika and under the hand of Vladimir Putin.

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