1:29pm

Fri May 11, 2012
Politics

The Case For A Presidential Science Debate

A group of science advocates say the American president should have the basic scientific know-how to understand policy challenges, evaluate options and devise solutions. Ira Flatow and guests discuss how a presidential science debate can help voters decide if a candidate is up for the job.

1:23pm

Fri May 11, 2012
Presidential Race

Why Race Could Color The Vote Against Obama

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. If the polls are a good indicator, the economy, jobs, the deficit, health care and education are likely to be the issues that weigh heavily on voters' minds when they head to the polls in November. But researchers say there may be another factor that influences the presidential vote this election cycle, and that's racial attitudes.

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1:22pm

Fri May 11, 2012
The Two-Way

Catholic Bishops Are Investigating The Girl Scouts

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 1:48 pm

The first girl scout, Daisy Gordon Lawrence (left), demonstrates techniques like rope-tying and fire-making to young scouts in the late 1940s.
Francis Miller Time

The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops sent an "official inquiry" to the Girl Scouts of the USA. NPR's Barbara Bradley Hagerty reports the bishops will investigate whether the iconic group has ties or views that conflict with Catholic teaching.

Barbara filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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1:18pm

Fri May 11, 2012
The Two-Way

'Mama Bird' Evelyn Johnson Dies At 102; Logged 7 Years Of Flight Time

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 2:12 pm

Evelyn Johnson, who holds a world record as the most experienced female pilot, appeared on NPR in 2003. Johnson died Thursday at the age of 102.
Charles Mayer NPR

Evelyn Bryan Johnson, a record-setting pilot who was born just six years after the Wright brothers made their historic flight, has died at the age of 102. Johnson, who began flying in 1944, holds the Guinness world record for the most hours logged by a female pilot — more than 57,000.

In addition to her accomplished flying record, Johnson also helped many other pilots earn their wings. After one student called her Mama Bird, the nickname stuck with Johnson, as she gave lessons and FAA flight exams to thousands of pilots.

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1:15pm

Fri May 11, 2012
NPR Story

'The Garbage-Men' Rock A Trashy Sound

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 1:50 pm

The Garbage-Men is a band of high school-aged musicians who play instruments made out of recycled cereal boxes, buckets, and other materials they've rescued from the trash. Guitarist Jack Berry and drummer Ollie Gray talk about the band and their signature "trashy" sound.

1:15pm

Fri May 11, 2012
NPR Story

Tracking The Spread Of A Nasty Virus

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 1:47 pm

When members of a travel soccer team in Oregon fell ill last year, the details of how the disease spread through the team were mysterious. Kimberly Repp, an epidemiologist in Washington County, Oregon, describes the medical detective work that led epidemiologists through the chain of transmission of the norovirus.

1:15pm

Fri May 11, 2012
NPR Story

Sizing Up Americans In 'The Weight Of The Nation'

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 1:43 pm

A new four-part documentary airing on HBO next week looks at America's growing weight problem. John Hoffman, vice president of HBO Documentary Films and executive producer of The Weight Of The Nation, describes his three year-project to document the causes and effects of being overweight and obese in America.

12:55pm

Fri May 11, 2012
Election 2012

Gay Marriage Stand Could Help Obama In Suburbia

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 2:00 pm

Marriage equality supporters Teri McClain (left) and Mary Beth Brotski demonstrate Thursday in Seattle.
Elaine Thompson AP

Republicans rule rural areas, while any Democrat can count on running up big margins in most of the large cities in the country. That has left the suburbs as the main partisan battleground.

For several election cycles now, the presidency has been won or lost based on the vote among suburbanites in a few key states. That's likely to be true again this November.

And some political observers believe that President Obama took the calculated risk that his newfound support for gay marriage rights will boost his campaign in these all-important counties.

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12:22pm

Fri May 11, 2012
The Two-Way

Mother On 'Time' Cover: Breastfeeding Photo Doesn't Show 'Nurturing Side'

Originally published on Sat May 12, 2012 4:18 am

The cover of the May 21, 2012 issue of Time.
AP

The latest cover of Time was obviously meant to spark conversation — and that it has.

The photo on the cover shows a 26-year-old mother breastfeeding her almost 4-year-old son. The reaction has been explosive and visceral and a lot of the more thoughtful commentary revolves around a philosophy by Dr. William Sears called attachment parenting, which encourages co-sleeping and carrying your baby everywhere and breast-feeding sometimes into toddlerhood.

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12:20pm

Fri May 11, 2012
Latin America

Art In A Neon Cage: Welcome To The Havana Biennial

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 7:35 pm

For her installation titled Condemned, Lorena Gutierrez used sheets of holographic vinyl and a custom-built cage with neon-light bars.
Nick Miroff NPR

In Cuba's socialist economy, if you want a well-paid career, you probably won't find it as a lawyer or engineer. You may do much better as an artist. Successful Cuban artists travel abroad, benefit from state support and can earn huge sums selling their work to foreign buyers.

And every two years, they get a shot at a breakthrough at the Havana Biennial, which has become one of the most important art events in Latin America.

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