12:00pm

Fri January 20, 2012
Presidential Race

High Stakes In South Carolina Primary

Originally published on Fri January 20, 2012 5:37 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, we will go to Mississippi, where a real firestorm is brewing over the more than 200 pardons former Governor Haley Barbour granted before he left office earlier this month. Now the state's attorney general is heading to court to try to void some of those. We'll talk with a reporter who's been covering this story in just a few minutes. But first we want to check in on national politics.

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12:00pm

Fri January 20, 2012
Barbershop

Shop Talk: Gingrich's Moral Fiber, Men's Obesity

The guys discuss Marianne Gingrich's comment that her ex-husband Newt is not morally fit to be president. They also weigh in funding issues with Red Tails, and new data showing that men are catching up to women when it comes to obesity rates. Host Michel Martin hears from Jimi Izrael, Arsalan Ifthikar, Kevin Williamson and Dave Zirin.

12:00pm

Fri January 20, 2012
BackTalk

Listeners Nominate Changes To Election Day

Tell Me More editor Ammad Omar and host Michel Martin comb recent listener feedback. More than 900 responses poured in for a recent conversation about pushing election day to the weekend. They also hear responses to an interview with the comedian who made the YouTube viral video about stuff 'white girls say.'

11:55am

Fri January 20, 2012
Planet Money

The Secret Document That Transformed China

Originally published on Fri January 20, 2012 9:03 pm

Yen Jingchang was one of the signers of the secret document.
Jacob Goldstein NPR

In 1978, the farmers in a small Chinese village called Xiaogang gathered in a mud hut to sign a secret contract. They thought it might get them executed. Instead, it wound up transforming China's economy in ways that are still reverberating today.

The contract was so risky — and such a big deal — because it was created at the height of communism in China. Everyone worked on the village's collective farm; there was no personal property.

"Back then, even one straw belonged to the group," says Yen Jingchang, who was a farmer in Xiaogang in 1978. "No one owned anything."

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11:54am

Fri January 20, 2012
Remembrances

Etta James: The 1994 Fresh Air Interview

Originally published on Fri January 27, 2012 10:54 am

Etta James onstage at the 2009 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival.
Rick Diamond Getty Images

Etta James, the legendary vocalist who is perhaps best known for her version of the song "At Last," has died. She was 73.

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11:50am

Fri January 20, 2012
The Two-Way

Singer Etta James Has Died

Etta James in 2008.
Alberto E. Rodriguez Getty Images
  • Felix Contreras on Etta James

NPR confirms, and CNN reports that:

"Etta James, whose assertive, earthy voice lit up such hits as The Wallflower, Something's Got a Hold on Me, and the wedding favorite At Last, has died, according to her longtime friend and manager, Lupe De Leon. She was 73 and had been diagnosed with leukemia in 2010."

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11:40am

Fri January 20, 2012
Music News

Remembering Etta James, Stunning Singer

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 2:03 pm

Etta James rehearses a song before recording at Fame Studios circa 1967 in Muscle Shoals, Ala.
House Of Fame LLC Michael Ochs Archive/Getty Images

The "Matriarch of the Blues" has died. Music legend Etta James died Friday morning at Riverside Community Hospital in California of complications from leukemia. She was 73.

She was born Jamesetta Hawkins in Los Angeles in 1938. Her first manager and promoter cut up Jamesetta's name and reversed it: Etta James.

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11:15am

Fri January 20, 2012
The Two-Way

Texas Redistricting Plan Tossed Out By Supreme Court

A plan for how to redraw Texas' congressional and state legislative districts that was put together by a three-judge federal court in San Antonio was rejected by the U.S. Supreme Court this morning because, the justices ruled, the lower court should not have disregarded the Texas state legislature's wishes and should not have stepped into that legislature's shoes.

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10:57am

Fri January 20, 2012
Author Interviews

The Inquisition: A Model For Modern Interrogators

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 1:42 pm

An illustration shows heretics being tortured and nailed to wooden posts during the first Inquisition.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

The individuals who participated in the first Inquisition 800 years ago kept detailed records of their activities. Vast archival collections at the Vatican, in France and in Spain contain accounts of torture victims' cries, descriptions of funeral pyres and even meticulous financial records about the price of torture equipment.

"[There are] expense accounts [for things] like how much did the rope cost to tie the hands of the person you burnt at the stake," says writer Cullen Murphy. "The people who were doing interrogations were meticulous."

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10:57am

Fri January 20, 2012
The Salt

Sustainable Seafood Swims To A Big-Box Store Near You

Originally published on Fri January 20, 2012 12:58 pm

Sustainably caught fish are no longer found just at fancy fishmongers.
iStockPhoto.com

It's no longer just Whole Foods shoppers seeking out certified, sustainable seafood.

Increasingly, those of us who shop the big-box retailers including Costco, Target and Walmart are finding a blue label on seafood packages. The Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) label signifies that the seafood comes from a fishery that's met a rigorous set of standards aimed at promoting responsible, sustainable catches.

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