4:00am

Mon November 21, 2011
Europe

'Boring' Rajoy Picked To Save Spain From Default

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 6:50 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Spain is the latest country to change its government over Europe's economic crisis. In a parliamentary election yesterday, Spaniards voted overwhelmingly to toss out the socialists who have ruled for almost eight years. They brought in Mariano Rajoy, leader of the conservative Popular Party.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

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4:00am

Mon November 21, 2011
Africa

Egyptian Police, Protesters Clash For 3rd Day

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 6:50 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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4:00am

Mon November 21, 2011
Energy

Seaway Pipeline Tweak Could Change Oil Market

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 7:06 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

There's a little-known oil pipeline that snakes 500 miles from Oklahoma all the way down to the Gulf of Mexico. And while most people have probably never heard of the Seaway Pipeline, a tweak to the line's operations could lead to big changes in the oil market. Reporter Dan Gorenstein has more.

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12:01am

Mon November 21, 2011
Movies

For Muppeteers, It Isn't Easy Being Invisible

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 8:51 am

Anchorphibian: Kermit the Frog does the backstage-chat thing with Amy Adams and Jason Segel in The Muppets.
Scott Garfield Disney

Sound Stage 28 at Universal Studios in Burbank, Calif., looks like any other Hollywood set — littered with wires, crew members everywhere. We pick our way through cables and cameras and stuff that would make Oscar the Grouch's trash can look tidy.

But then we head up — up a flight of wooden stairs that leads to the old set of the 1925 Lon Chaney silent film The Phantom of the Opera. It's draped with dusty red-velvet swags, and it looks like it might still harbor a ghost or two.

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12:01am

Mon November 21, 2011
Around the Nation

Can Electric Cars Help Automakers Reach 55 MPG?

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 8:07 pm

A Nissan Leaf charges at a station in Portland, Ore., that can recharge an electric car in 30 minutes. Electric cars could be an integral part of meeting 55-mpg fuel standards by 2025, but many consumers are put off by the vehicles' higher price and what some call "range anxiety."
Rick Bowmer AP

First in a three-part series

Under fuel-economy rules announced by the White House this summer, cars will have to get an average of 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025 — nearly double the current average. Reaching that goal will take not only feats of engineering but also changing how Americans think about their cars and how they drive them.

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12:01am

Mon November 21, 2011
Governing

For Debt Committee, No Final Hour Deal Apparent

Monday is the last day the congressional supercommittee can reach a deficit reduction deal and still make its Wednesday deadline. The legislation has to be publicly available for 48 hours before a vote and the clock is ticking, but instead of announcing an agreement, it is widely expected the committee will admit it has failed.

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12:01am

Mon November 21, 2011
Job 1: Careers That Shaped The GOP Candidates

Santorum: Early Political Work Influences Him Still

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 12:50 pm

Former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum greets voters this summer in Iowa. The Republican presidential hopeful has spent most of his professional life in politics.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Seventh in a series

Presidential candidate Rick Santorum consistently polls near the bottom of the Republican pack. But he appears undeterred in his bid for the White House. Santorum's work life in his 20s provides some insight into why he perseveres despite long odds.

The former senator from Pennsylvania is best known for his conservative social positions, especially his opposition to abortion rights and gay marriage. He's also known for expressing what he thinks very frankly.

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12:01am

Mon November 21, 2011
Business

Small Businesses Feel Crunch Of Italy's Debt Woes

Enrico Frare owns a small clothing company in Italy. He says it's so difficult to get credit in Italy right now some businesses are being forced to leave.
Jim Zarroli NPR

Enrico Frare isn't a well known name in Italian business. The 36-year-old runs E-group, a small clothing company in the commercial region around Treviso that makes winter sportswear.

But last month, Frare did something that attracted a lot of attention. He bought a full-page ad in Milan's main newspaper appearing in what might politely be called his birthday suit. The caption read: "Every day in Italy an entrepreneur risks losing his shirt."

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12:01am

Mon November 21, 2011
Planet Money

Why A New York Cheese Buyer Hangs On The Euro's Fate

Aaron Foster, with cheese.
David Kestenbaum NPR

Among the chilly aisles at Murray's Cheese Shop in Manhattan, the entire continent of Europe is represented. Something like 60 percent of the cheese in Murray's comes from the continent, according to Aaron Foster, a cheese buyer at the store.

For all the talk about how the European debt crisis is effecting the global economy, it can be hard to connect it with daily life here in the U.S. Here's one link: Aaron Foster's bonus depends on how cheaply he can buy cheese from Europe. And the price of that cheese is driven largely by the strength (or weakness) of the euro.

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