1:00pm

Fri February 10, 2012
NPR Story

Next Supercontinent Could Form At The North Pole

Several times in earth's history continents have collided to form supercontinents only to later break apart. Geologist Ross Mitchell discusses a new study in Nature that predicts in 50 to 200 million years time the Americas and Eurasia will collide to form a supercontinent over the Arctic.

1:00pm

Fri February 10, 2012
NPR Story

The Science Of Yoga: The Risks And The Rewards

In his book The Science of Yoga: The Risks and the Rewards, New York Times science writer and long-time yoga practitioner William Broad investigates popular health claims about yoga--that it boosts metabolism, for example--and finds that scientific studies tell a different story.

1:00pm

Fri February 10, 2012
NPR Story

Drug Rapidly Counters Effects of Alzheimer's In Mice

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 1:58 pm

Transcript

JOHN DANKOSKY, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm John Dankosky, sitting in for Ira Flatow. Scientists have long been studied amyloid beta, those sticky protein fragments that build up in the brains of Alzheimer's patients. What you may not know is that amyloid beta is produced in everyone's brain, including my brain as I speak to you right now.

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12:50pm

Fri February 10, 2012
The Two-Way

Deal With Banks Isn't Only Way For Homeowners To Get Help, HUD Chief Says

For sale signs on a foreclosed house in Glendale, Calif., last September.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images
  • Michel Martin talks with HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan

The $25 billion settlement with five banks unveiled Thursday, which aims to give some mortgage relief and other help to homeowners who got hurt when the housing bubble burst before the 2007-2009 recession, has been viewed with skepticism by some folks in the nation's hardest-hit housing markets, as NPR's Greg Allen reported.

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12:36pm

Fri February 10, 2012
The Two-Way

Stocks Take Dive, As Greek Bailout Deal Remains Uncertain

Protesters write on the wall of the National Bank of Greece during a demonstration involving thousands in Athens on Friday.
Milos Bicanski Getty Images

Just a day after it appeared that Greece and its eurozone partners had reached a deal, we're back where we've been for months: There are fiery protests on the streets of Athens, the markets and the euro are in turmoil and negotiations are at a tense point with four Greek Cabinet ministers tendering resignations over their opposition to austerity measures.

Here's the how the AP rounds up the latest:

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12:00pm

Fri February 10, 2012
Barbershop

Shop Talk: CNN Tangles With Controversy

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 12:43 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly to the Barbershop where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds.

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12:00pm

Fri February 10, 2012
BackTalk

'Linsanity' Taking Knicks, NBA By Storm

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 12:43 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now it's time for BackTalk. That's where we lift the curtain on what's happening in the TELL ME MORE blogosphere. Editor Ammad Omar is here with us once again.

Ammad, what do you have for us today?

AMMAD OMAR, BYLINE: All right, Michel. We're going to start with a women's health topic that's been in the news and we covered in our political chat on Wednesday. We talked about that decision by the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation to strip funding from Planned Parenthood and why they eventually reversed that decision.

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12:00pm

Fri February 10, 2012
Race

The High Price Of Being A Black Atheist

A group of African American humanists is running an ad campaign during February. It features historical figures, including Frederick Douglass and Langston Hughes, who they believe shared humanist values. Alix Jules is part of the campaign and he speaks with host Michel Martin about his experience as a black atheist.

12:00pm

Fri February 10, 2012
Faith Matters

Mixed Reactions To First Native American Saint

The Vatican recently announced that the 17th-century Mohawk woman, Kateri Tekakwitha, will be canonized as a Catholic saint. Many Native Americans say this is an honor, but others feel it legitimizes the abuses of colonialism. Host Michel Martin speaks with reporter Brian Bull, chair of the group, Native American Public Telecommunications.

12:00pm

Fri February 10, 2012
Politics

Secretary Donovan Talks Multi-Billion Deal

Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan talks with host Michel Martin about the settlement reached yesterday between federal and state officials and major banks. It was an effort to address unfair banking practices that led to the mortgage crisis. President Obama praised the deal, but critics say the settlement is inadequate.

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