3:07pm

Thu November 3, 2011
Books

'The Art Museum': A Case For The Printed Book?

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 3:01 pm

If The Art Museum were a real museum and not just a book, there would hardly be need for another. At 18 pounds and 922 pages, the expansive book is organized into thematic "galleries," and within those "rooms" dedicated to solo artists, like Picasso.
Phaidon

Publisher Phaidon's latest art endeavor, The Art Museum, presents the collection of an imaginary museum with the greatest works from art collections around the globe. That museum would have to be imaginary — the book itself weighs in at 18 pounds, measures 16 1/2 by 12 5/8 inches and runs nearly 1,000 pages.

The Art Museum is divided into 25 galleries, as opposed to chapters, and each gallery is divided into several rooms, which all told include reproductions of more than 2,700 works.

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3:00pm

Thu November 3, 2011
World

Greek Drama Dominates Talks At G-20 Summit

Originally published on Thu November 3, 2011 7:37 pm

President Obama speaks with (from left) French President Nicolas Sarkozy, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and British Prime Minister David Cameron at the G-20 summit in Cannes, France, on Thursday. The talks were dominated by Greece's financial woes.
Charles Dharapak AP

Greece's decision to scrap a referendum on new austerity measures added a note of urgency to the G-20 summit meeting that began in Cannes, France, on Thursday. President Obama and other G-20 leaders are trying to prevent the Greek debt crisis from spreading to the rest of Europe and beyond.

Before the G-20 summit formally got under way, Obama met privately with the leaders of France and Germany — Europe's two biggest economies. They're also the architects of a continental debt rescue plan.

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3:00pm

Thu November 3, 2011
Europe

Why Put The Bailout To A Referendum In Greece?

Robert Siegel speaks to Mark Mazower, a professor of history at Columbia University and an expert on contemporary Greece, about the tensions between democracy and the need for decisive action in dealing with the euro crisis. Mazower says that the speed of financial markets, and the slowness of the democratic process, has increased this tension during the crisis.

3:00pm

Thu November 3, 2011
Business

Filene's Basement To Close Its Doors

Filene's Basement, the storied discount store, has filed for bankruptcy and plans to close down all its locations by the new year. Its parent company, Syms Corp., has also filed for Chapter 11.

3:00pm

Thu November 3, 2011
NPR Story

Ongoing Palestinian-Israeli Conflict Leaves U.S. Isolated

The Obama administration's flagging efforts to revive Arab-Israeli peace talks took another turn in the wrong direction this week. The Palestinians overcame U.S. opposition and won diplomatic recognition by UNESCO, becoming a new member state of the U.N.'s cultural and scientific agency. They've vowed to keep seeking such recognition elsewhere in the U.N system. Israel responded by speeding up settlement construction. U.S. officials say those moves are pushing the parties further away from a peace process, but both sides seem determined to move in opposition directions, leaving the U.S.

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3:00pm

Thu November 3, 2011
NPR Story

Report: Nation's Poor Cluster In Neighborhoods

The U.S. poverty rate was 15 percent last year — the highest in almost two decades. New numbers out Thursday from the Brookings Institution show that the nation's poor are increasingly concentrated in extremely poor neighborhoods. This creates additional problems for those trying to work their way out of poverty.

2:59pm

Thu November 3, 2011
The Two-Way

Another Tibetan Nun Sets Herself On Fire

Palden Choetso.
Free Tibet

In what's becoming a disturbing trend in China, another Tibetan nun has set herself on fire to protest the country's strict control of their religion.

The Free Tibet Campaign says Palden Choetso is second nun to self immolate. Nine monks have done the same since March.

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2:52pm

Thu November 3, 2011
Deceptive Cadence

Hey, Kids, It's Vinny Pookh Time! Cartoon Music From The USSR

1969's Vinny Pookh V Gosti ("Winnie The Pooh Goes Visiting"), with music by Mieczysław Weinberg.
YouTube

Twentieth-century Russian music is often thought of as dark and brooding, a reflection of life under the thumb of a brutal state. When it was funny, it usually had a kind of gallows humor.

Yet many of the same composers whose concert works often reflected a dark reality also wrote cartoon music for kids. Thursday night, the Brooklyn Philharmonic is playing some of these cartoon scores in Brighton Beach — the heart of the Russian-American community in New York City. For some of its creators, cartoon music offered a certain kind of escape.

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2:21pm

Thu November 3, 2011
NPR Story

The 'Best Sports Writing' Is Rarely In The Newspaper

The best sports writing forces us to confront wonder, horror, disappointment and joy. These days, those stories are found not on the sports pages, but in magazines and on the Web.

Jane Leavy, editor of The Best Sports Writing 2011, shares her favorites, including Jake Bogoch's piece on hockey, "School of Fight: Learning to Brawl with the Hockey Goons of Tomorrow."

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2:19pm

Thu November 3, 2011
The Two-Way

After 520 Days In Isolation, 'Astronauts' About To End Fake Mission To Mars

Members of the Mars500 crew posing during their Mars500 mission.
AFP/Getty Images

To us it sounded like the premise of a particularly cruel reality TV show: Six men are picked to live in a windowless, cramped mock spaceship for 18 months to see how humans would react to conditions similar to what one would expect on a mission to Mars.

Tomorrow, after 520 days of isolation, the hatch will finally be open and the volunteers will return to normal life. With a cost of $15 million, the project, dubbed Mars500, is a serious experiment commissioned by the European Space Agency.

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