12:00pm

Mon January 23, 2012
Law

New Generation Grapples With Roe V. Wade

It's been 39 years since the Supreme Court legalized abortion in 50 states. But last year, states passed a record number of laws that made getting abortions tougher, including one that bars insurance companies from covering the procedure. Host Michel Martin speaks discusses abortion rights today with three female university students. Advisory: This conversation may not be comfortable for some listeners.

12:00pm

Mon January 23, 2012
Presidential Race

How Newt Gingrich Changes GOP Race With S.C. Win

Gingrich earned a decisive win in the South Carolina primary, so now the Republican presidential nomination race has three different winners in three different states. Host Michel Martin explores what this means going into the Florida primary, and previews the State of the Union speech. She hears from journalists Mary Kate Cary and Cynthia Tucker.

12:00pm

Mon January 23, 2012
Remembrances

Remembering The Late Singing Legend Etta James

James passed away on Friday from leukemia-related complications. She was 73 years old. She's best known for the 1961 rendition of 'At Last,' but her dynamic voice found success in many genres, including blues, jazz and pop. Host Michel Martin looks back on James' storied career.

11:49am

Mon January 23, 2012
Music Interviews

Winter Songs: Tap Dancing To 'Sixteen Tons' On The Hood

In rural Minnesota, listener Veronica Horton made her own fun by dancing to "Tennessee" Ernie Ford's classic song on an old car.
Roman Krochuk iStockphoto.com

For the past few months, All Things Considered has asked for your memories of music that reminds you of winter.

For listener Veronica Horton of Vermillion, S.D., "Tennessee" Ernie Ford's "Sixteen Tons" reminds her of dancing in the back of a barn in Minnesota.

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11:46am

Mon January 23, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Stem Cells Show Promise As Blindness Treatment In Early Study

Sue Freeman, 78, checks her e-mail at her home in Laguna Beach, Calif., on Saturday. An experimental stem-cell procedure last July led to a marked improvement in her eyesight.
Melissa Forsyth for NPR

Two women losing their sight to progressive forms of blindness may have regained some vision while participating in an experiment testing a treatment made from human embryonic stem cells, researchers reported today.

The report marks the first time that scientists have produced direct evidence that human embryonic stem cells may have helped a patient. The cells had only previously been tested in the laboratory or in animals.

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11:39am

Mon January 23, 2012
The Two-Way

Supreme Court Rules Police Need Warrant For GPS Tracking

Originally published on Mon January 23, 2012 2:26 pm

The Supreme Court heard arguments in a case about whether GPS monitoring devices like this one may be affixed to suspects' cars without a warrant from a judge.
Yasir Afifi AP

The Supreme Court has just ruled that police need a warrant if they want to place a tracking device on a suspect's vehicle. The court's decision was unanimous.

NPR's Nina Totenberg says that this debate has been a contentious issue in the digital age. Here's how she explained it to newscaster Paul Brown:

At issue here is the case of Antoine Jones, a Washington, D.C. night club owner. Police put a GPS tracking device on his car for 30 days. That helped authorities find a stash of money and drugs.

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11:09am

Mon January 23, 2012
The Salt

Geoengineered Food? Climate Fix Could Boost Crop Yields, But With Risks

Altering the upper atmosphere could block enough sunlight to offset the warming effects of climate change and protect food crops. But what are the risks?
iStockphoto

For a few years now, a handful of scientists have been proposing grandiose technological fixes for the world's climate to combat the effects of global warming — schemes called geoengineering.

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11:08am

Mon January 23, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

A Permanent Home That Allows Drinking Helps Homeless Drink Less

Originally published on Mon January 23, 2012 11:09 am

The 1811 Eastlake apartment building in Seattle houses homeless alcoholics without requiring them to stop drinking.
Ted S. Warren AP

Most housing set up to help the homeless comes with a strict no-booze policy.

But a study on a controversial complex in Seattle that allows chronic alcoholics to keep drinking suggests the lenient approach can work too.

Homeless people with alcohol problems decreased their consumption over two years at the facility, called 1811 Eastlake. The average amount of alcohol consumed on a typical drinking day by the 95 study participants had decreased by about 25 percent at the end of the two-year study.

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11:02am

Mon January 23, 2012
The Two-Way

Syria Rejects Arab League's Plan

Saying it was a "blatant interference in its internal affairs," Syria rejected an Arab League plan that the organization hoped would bring an end to the violence.

According to the Syrian Arab News Agency (SANA), the official state news agency, the government condemed the plan and accused the Arab League of arming terrorist groups, which they say are responsible for killing civilians and attacking state facilities.

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10:02am

Mon January 23, 2012
It's All Politics

Rollicking Republican Battle On For 'Swing Part Of The Swing State' Of Florida

Originally published on Mon January 23, 2012 11:32 am

Patriotic paraphernalia at a "Conservatives United 2012" rally on Saturday in Orlando, Fla.
Becky Lettenberger NPR

Mitt Romney is reeling. Newt Gingrich is surging. Rick Santorum is hanging on. And Ron Paul continues to zig while others zag.

So goes the rollicking but inconclusive — so far — Republican presidential contest, as it moves from small ball to big time in Florida for a Jan. 31 primary in which some 4 million state Republicans are eligible to vote.

Perspective? More Florida Republicans have already cast early ballots than all New Hampshire votes tallied for the top three finishers in that state's Jan. 10 GOP primary, about 197,000.

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