4:00am

Wed October 26, 2011
Politics

Supercommittee Reconvenes On Deficit Reductions

The deficit-cutting supercommittee re-emerges Wednesday morning with its first public meeting in more than a month. The group is charged with finding at least $1.2 trillion in deficit reductions by late November. If it fails, automatic, across-the-board cuts follow.

4:00am

Wed October 26, 2011
Sports

NCAA Meeting Puts Players' Rights In Spotlight

Originally published on Thu October 27, 2011 12:27 am

NCAA officials meets Wednesday to continue on a path toward what they call meaningful reform in college sports. High-profile scandals over the past several years prompted the pledge for change. Ramogi Huma will be watching the NCAA closely, as he has for the past 15 years. The former college football player has been a passionate advocate for college athletes' rights. For the most part, he has worked behind the scenes. Now, his work has taken on new relevance.

4:00am

Wed October 26, 2011
Europe

In Germany's Finance Capital, All Eyes On Debt Meeting

In Frankfurt, Germany's financial capital, all eyes are on the debt crisis meeting in Brussels. Frankfurt is home to Europe's leading stock exchange and some of the largest banks and investment firms on the continent. More recently it's also home to street demonstrators sharply critical of the current state of capitalism. The two worlds have yet to meet.

4:00am

Wed October 26, 2011
Europe

Hurdles Facing EU Leaders At Brussels Debt Summit

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, host: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host: And I'm Renee Montagne.

The European Union is facing the worst crisis in its history and it has to the potential to affect us all. The meltdown in Greece could eventually imperil the entire global financial system. Today in Brussels, Europe's leaders will make another attempt at finalizing a eurozone survival plan. But time is short and the stakes could not be higher. The key players have big national issues to worry about.

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4:00am

Wed October 26, 2011
U.S.

Occupy Oakland Protesters Clash With Police

Ari Shapiro speaks with San Francisco Chronicle reporter Matthai Kuruvila about Tuesday's dramatic clashes between police in Oakland, California, and protesters supporting the Occupy Wall Street movement.

4:00am

Wed October 26, 2011
NPR Story

Business News

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host: NPR's business news starts with the government's insider trading probe.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: Federal prosecutors are set to file criminal charges today against a prominent business executive. Rajat Gupta was head of the consulting firm MacKenzie and a board member of Goldman Sachs.

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3:54am

Wed October 26, 2011
Law

As It Turns 10, Patriot Act Remains Controversial

Originally published on Wed October 26, 2011 10:27 am

Protesters hold up signs outside of Federal Hall during a demonstration against then-U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft in 2003 in New York City.

Spencer Platt Getty Images

Ten years ago, on Oct. 26, 2001, President George W. Bush signed the USA Patriot Act.

Congress overwhelmingly passed the law only weeks after the Sept. 11 attacks. It's designed to give the FBI more power to collect information in cases that involve national security.

But in the decade since then, civil liberties groups have raised concerns about whether the Patriot Act goes too far by scooping up too much data and violating people's rights to privacy.

Nicholas Merrill is one of the people sounding an alarm.

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3:52am

Wed October 26, 2011
Energy

In Northwest Town, A Local Fight Against Global Coal

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:18 am

Bellingham, Wash., a progressive college town of 81,000, could soon be home to a new coal terminal. Developers want to ship the lucrative commodity to China, but some locals are worried about the potential environmental impacts.

Brett Beadle for NPR

This is the first of two reports on plans to export U.S. coal to China.

Plans are afoot to build giant new coal terminals on the West Coast to ship this lucrative commodity to China. But activists want to stop this, in part because coal produces huge amounts of carbon dioxide when it's burned. Federal climate policy is silent on this potentially large source of emissions, so the debate is happening at the local level.

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Geoff Nunberg is the linguist contributor on NPR's Fresh Air with Terry Gross.

He teaches at the School of Information at the University of California at Berkeley and is the author of The Way We Talk Now, Going Nucular, Talking Right and The Years of Talking Dangerously. His most recent book is Ascent of the A-Word. His website is www.geoffreynunberg.com.

10:00pm

Tue October 25, 2011
Sweetness And Light

The (Basketball) Show Must Go On

Originally published on Wed October 26, 2011 8:44 am

Fans who are tired of the NBA lockout can get some basketball entertainment from a new show, Lysistrata Jones, which opens on Broadway next month.

Carol Rosegg AP

For those of you desperately missing basketball during the NBA lockout, an antidote to your hoop pangs is on the way: A musical comedy about basketball will open for previews on Broadway on Nov. 12. It's called Lysistrata Jones and is based on the original Lysistrata, which, of course, was written by Aristophanes back in 411 B.C.

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