2:56pm

Sun October 23, 2011
Strange News

Was It A Cat I Saw? (Nope: It Was A Palindrome)

Originally published on Sun October 23, 2011 7:19 pm

The Master Palindromist. "I happen to believe that I can change the world with reversibility," Duncan says.

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Barry Duncan constructs a palindrome in a scene from Michael Rossi's documentary The Master Palindromist. "I happen to believe that I can change the world with reversibility," Duncan says.

Michael Rossi

Barry Duncan has an obsession that follows him everywhere he goes. "I see street signs, restaurant menus, objects while I'm walking along, and I'm just reversing them all the time," he tells Guy Raz, host of weekends on All Things Considered.

Duncan is a master palindromist. He creates phrases, sentences, even passages that read the same forward and backward. He's been at it since 1981, when he was working at a bookstore in Philadelphia and stumbled onto a book of wordplay.

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2:03pm

Sun October 23, 2011
Music Interviews

Jane's Addiction: Breaking With A Turbulent Past

Perry Farrell performs with Jane's Addiction. The reunited band's new album is called The Great Escape Artist.

Kyle Dean Reinford Courtesy of the artist

Jane's Addiction defined the Los Angeles rock scene of the late 1980s, and by the beginning of the next decade, the band had become famous worldwide. But almost as soon as they'd gained the world's attention, Jane's Addiction split up.

Modest reunions have taken place since then. This month, three of the four original members are back with a new album, The Great Escape Artist. Weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz, who grew up listening to Jane's Addiction, spoke to the group's leader, Perry Farrell.

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1:46pm

Sun October 23, 2011
World

Powerful Earthquake Strikes Eastern Turkey

A 7.2-magnitude earthquake struck eastern Turkey on Sunday, collapsing dozens of buildings into piles of twisted steel and chunks of concrete. NPR's Peter Kenyon reports.

8:14am

Sun October 23, 2011
Africa

Tunisians Wake To Their Very First Election Day

Originally published on Sun October 23, 2011 7:20 pm

Tunisians are voting Sunday in the country's first free and democratic election. The small North African nation was the first to overthrow its dictator last January in a popular movement that soon spread to other authoritarian Arab nations.

Now, analysts say what happens in Tunisia will be key to whether democracy is to take root across the rest of the Arab world.

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8:00am

Sun October 23, 2011
Africa

Gadhafi's Death Gets Mixed Reactions In Africa

Moammar Gadhafi styled himself as Africa's king of kings and long pursued his grand plan to unite the continent under his rule. NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports on how his brutal end is resonating in Sub-Saharan Africa.

8:00am

Sun October 23, 2011
Middle East

Future Uncertain On Libya's Day Of 'Liberation'

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, host: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

It's an historic day in Libya. The country's new leaders are set to declare their country liberated. An interim government will soon be sworn in and Libyans are hoping to have elections in eight months. But the road ahead won't be easy. In Misrata, Moammar Gadhafi's body has been left on display. Libyans who went to see his corpse yesterday had their own thoughts on what lies ahead and what the former dictator's death means to them.

NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro is in Misrata.

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8:00am

Sun October 23, 2011
Media

Old-Time Radio Fans Sign Off

Originally published on Sun October 23, 2011 4:30 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, host: Long before there were sitcoms, reality TV and programs like "American Idol" and "Dancing with the Stars," millions of Americans tuned their ears and their imaginations each week to the radio. Programs like "The Shadow," "Gunsmoke" and "Lux Radio Theater," were pretty popular in the 1930s through the 1950s; and even today, they have their fans. A few hundred of those fans gathered in Newark, New Jersey this weekend to keep the art of radio drama alive. But as Scott Gurian reports, this gathering will be their last.

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8:00am

Sun October 23, 2011
World

Central Asia Warms To Clinton As Afghan Drawdown Looms

Originally published on Sun October 23, 2011 4:30 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, host: Secretary of State Hillary Clinton winds up a week long overseas tour today, one that's focused on the war in Afghanistan and tensions with Pakistan. Her last couple of stops were in Central Asia, which is playing an increasingly important role as the U.S. begins its drawdown in Afghanistan. NPR's Jackie Northam has been traveling with the secretary. She has this report from Tashkent, Uzbekistan, the last stop on Clinton's tour.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

Secretary HILLARY CLINTON: Thank you.

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8:00am

Sun October 23, 2011
Europe

European Debt-Crisis Agreement Not Quite Ready

Originally published on Sun October 23, 2011 4:30 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, host: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News, I'm Audie Cornish. In Brussels, European leaders are meeting to forge consensus on a broad plan to stop the eurozone's worsening debt crisis from spreading. But it doesn't look like there will be a breakthrough - at least not until another summit on Wednesday. NPR's Eric Westervelt is in Brussels and we have him on the line. Eric, some people were saying that this was the weekend to save the euro, but what's happening?

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8:00am

Sun October 23, 2011
Around the Nation

'BioBlitz' Sweeps 142 Square Miles For Every Living Thing

Originally published on Sun October 23, 2011 4:30 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, host: Look out your window. How long do you think it would take to identify all the living species you see in your backyard? From a giant oak tree or the family dog right down to the microscopic level, thousands of volunteers and scientists tried to do just that on 142 square miles in one day. NPR's Ted Robbins reports on the BioBlitz outside Tucson.

TED ROBBINS: Bert Frost, the chief scientist for the National Park Service looked at the people roaming Saguaro National Park and thought, we're having a treasure hunt.

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