1:00pm

Tue October 25, 2011
NPR Story

NPR's Loren Jenkins On Changing World Coverage

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, host: This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Congratulations, you are now the senior foreign editor at NPR, responsible for managing 17 bureaus around the world. So today, where do you devote those resources?

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1:00pm

Tue October 25, 2011
The Record

Rocksmith: Guitar Hero Gets Real(er)

Paul Cross, creative director of Rocksmith, plays the game at a demonstration event in San Francisco, Calif.

Kimihiro Hoshino AFP/Getty Images

Music-based games like Rock Band and Guitar Hero, which let you play along to popular songs with fake instruments, once ruled the video game industry. They raked in billions of dollars in sales in 2008, when their popularity was at its peak. But such games have since lost their luster, and sales for both have plummeted. Now the French video game publisher and development company Ubisoft is hoping to revive interest in the video game genre by adding a new twist — the ability to use a real guitar.

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12:53pm

Tue October 25, 2011
Tuned To Yesterday #438

Tuned To Yesterday

#438 - Mystery: Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar "The Man Who Wrote Himself To Death" 3/21/50, Adventures Of Michael Shayne "Case Of The Model Murder" 1948

Tuned To Yesterday features programs from radio's golden era. Drama, Comedy, Western, Sci-Fi and more. Produced by Mark Lavonier.

12:40pm

Tue October 25, 2011
The Two-Way

WWF: Javan Rhinoceros Extinct In Vietnam

Originally published on Tue October 25, 2011 2:22 pm

After a year-long survey, the World Wildlife Foundation has come to the conclusion that there are no more rhinoceros left in Vietnam. Specifically, the Javan rhino has disappeared from Cat Tien National Park, one of two of its remaining habitats in the world.

The WWF took dung samples from 2009 to 2010 and through genetic analysis they found the 22 samples belonged to a rhino that was found dead in the national preserve in 2010. That rhino was found with a bullet in its leg and with its horn cut off.

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Amy Walters is a producer for NPR based at NPR West in Los Angeles.

After graduating from Earlham College with a Bachelor's degree in English, Walters interned at NPR in the Middle East. After returning to the states she joined the staff of Morning Edition in 2000. Soon Walters was recruited to All Things Considered and spent two years on the show. On September 11, 2001, Walters stood on top of NPR's Washington, DC, headquarters watching the smoke float by from the attack on the Pentagon. Walters contributed to NPR's award-winning coverage of that day. The following year she interviewed and produced several minute long segments of survivors remembering the loved ones they lost that day.

Laura Sullivan is a NPR News investigative correspondent whose work has cast a light on some of the country's most disadvantaged people.

Sullivan is one of NPR's most decorated journalists, with three Peabody Awards and two Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Batons. She joined NPR in 2004 as a correspondent on the National Desk. For six years she covered crime and punishment issues, with reports airing regularly on Morning Edition, All Things Considered and other NPR programs before joining NPR's investigations unit.

12:01pm

Tue October 25, 2011
NPR News Investigations

Native Foster Care: Lost Children, Shattered Families

Originally published on Thu October 27, 2011 12:27 pm

Derrin Yellow Robe, 3, stands in his great-grandparents' backyard on the Crow Creek Reservation in South Dakota. Along with his twin sister and two older sisters, he was taken off the reservation by South Dakota's Department of Social Services in July 2009 and spent a year and a half in foster care before being returned to his family.

John Poole NPR

Overview of a three-part investigation

Nearly 700 Native American children in South Dakota are being removed from their homes every year, sometimes under questionable circumstances. An NPR News investigation has found that the state is largely failing to place them according to the law. The vast majority of native kids in foster care in South Dakota are in nonnative homes or group homes, according to an NPR analysis of state records.

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12:00pm

Tue October 25, 2011
On Disabilities

When Crime Rings Target The Disabled

Originally published on Wed October 26, 2011 5:23 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News.

Coming up, a story about one woman's three-year fight to bring her grandchildren home. The story of this Lakota Sioux woman is just one of those told in an NPR investigation about why so many Native American children end up in foster care. Do they really need to be there? That conversation in just a few minutes.

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12:00pm

Tue October 25, 2011
NPR Story

Too Much Drama Between Our Mamas?

Mommy beef can ensue when one parent always complains about snacks but never brings any, or when someone insists on playing by the rules, even when they don't make sense. This week's parenting conversation focuses on how parents run into and handle conflicts between each other. Michel Martin speaks with regular Tell Me More contributors Dani Tucker and Leslie Morgan Steiner, blogger Sarah Maizes and freelance journalist Jamila Bey.

12:00pm

Tue October 25, 2011
NPR Story

Latinos Lagging On Retirement Savings, Says Pew

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, host: And now to matters of personal finance. Most people probably know this: Latinos are now the largest minority group in the U.S. But according to a recent report by a respected research group, they are among the least likely to invest in or keep money in retirement savings accounts, like 401ks. According to the Pew Hispanic Center, just 10 percent of the nation's 50.5 million Hispanics have individual retirement, or Keogh, accounts.

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