4:00am

Tue October 18, 2011
Middle East

Israeli Soldier Freed In Exchange For Palestinian Prisoners

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 8:20 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

A dramatic prisoner swap is underway now, between Israel and the Palestinians. After five years in captivity, Israeli soldier, Gilad Shalit, is free. He is in Israel, and we'll go there in a moment.

First, to the West Bank and the city of Ramallah. That's where NPR's Peter Kenyon is, surrounded by a jubilant crowd of Palestinians.

Good morning, Peter.

PETER KENYON, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee.

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1:36am

Tue October 18, 2011
Middle East

Hamas Militants Release Captured Israeli Soldier

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:19 am

Released Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit, (second right), walks with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, (second left), Defense Minister Ehud Barak, and Israeli Chief of Staff Lt. Gen. Benny Gantz, on Tuesday. Schalit returned home from more than five years of captivity in the Gaza Strip.
Israeli Defense Ministry AP

Thousands of people jammed the tiny hometown of Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit on Tuesday to celebrate his arrival after more than five years in the captivity of Hamas militants.

Shalit was freed hours earlier in exchange for the release of more than 1,000 Palestinian prisoners in the most lopsided prisoner swap in Israel's history.

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12:01am

Tue October 18, 2011
Economy

Obama Drives Jobs Plan Message To N.C. Crowds

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 8:20 am

With his bus in the background, President Barack Obama greets people outside of Mast General Store in Boone, N.C., Monday. Obama is on a three-day bus tour promoting the American Jobs Act.

Susan Walsh AP

President Obama is drawing sharp contrasts between his jobs plan and the ideas put forward by Republicans in Congress as he continues his bus tour through North Carolina and Virginia. That may not bring his jobs plan any closer to passing, but it does help frame the argument for the 2012 election.

Obama is urging Congress to pass his jobs bill piece by piece if necessary. And the piece he was highlighting Monday night in an overheated high school gym in Millers Creek, N.C., would use federal tax dollars to help local governments keep teachers and other employees on the payroll.

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12:01am

Tue October 18, 2011
Tina Brown's Must-Reads

Tina Brown's Must Reads: The Republican Schism

Daily Beast Editor-in-Chief Tina Brown

Tina Brown, editor of The Daily Beast and Newsweek, tells us what she's been reading in a feature that Morning Edition likes to call Word of Mouth.

This week, Brown says the media is taking a closer look at the gap between the Republican establishment and the Tea Party. "There's a kind of fire bomb that's about to go off when the debt talks again resume," she says.

The Republicans Are 'Playing With Fire'

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12:01am

Tue October 18, 2011
2 Languages, Many Voices: Latinos In The U.S.

Author Malin Alegria Builds On 'Estrella's' Star Power

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 2:39 pm

Malin Alegria lives in San Jose, Calif., where she teaches and writes.

Dulce Baron

Writer Malin Alegria's first novel, Estrella's Quinceanera, covers familiar territory for anyone who has ever been a 15-year-old girl battling with her mother — but the fact that the book's sassy protagonist, Estrella Alvarez, is Mexican-American makes her unique in the world of young adult fiction.

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12:01am

Tue October 18, 2011
Business

Some Ford Workers Skeptical Of Proposed Contract

Members of the United Auto Workers finish voting Tuesday on a new contract with automaker Ford that would mean nearly 6,000 new jobs in U.S. Ford and the UAW both say it's a good deal for the company and its union employees, but many workers remain unconvinced

In its 87 years, Ford's Chicago assembly plant, which is on the city's South Side, has made an array of Fords from to the Model A to the Model T to the latest Ford Taurus.

Orlando Mendoza, who has worked at Ford for 19 years, says he opposes the proposed contract.

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12:01am

Tue October 18, 2011
Religion

Doomsday Redux: Prophet Says World Will End Friday

On the National Mall in Washington, D.C., in May, David Liquori (right) talks with passersby.

Mito Habe-Evans NPR

Mark your calendars: The world is ending on Oct. 21.

This announcement comes from Harold Camping, the doomsday prophet who said Judgment Day would come on May 21, 2011. On that day, a rolling earthquake was supposed to devastate the world. True believers would join Jesus in heaven. Unbelievers would be tormented for the next five months.

So, when May 21 came and nothing happened, Camping had some explaining to do. Two days later, Camping, the head of Family Radio Network, announced he had been right about the date of God's wrath — just not the method.

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12:01am

Tue October 18, 2011
Your Money

Income Disparity And The 'Price Of Civilization'

During an Occupy Chicago demonstration at the Bank of America building in Chicago, Kaye Gamble holds a sign protesting corporate greed.

Scott Olson Getty Images

The Occupy Wall Street movement has been criticized for lacking focus — but its main slogan seems to be resonating. That slogan, "We are the 99 percent," highlights the issue of income disparity. It's something economist Jeffrey Sachs has been tracking for a long time.

The top 1 percent of U.S. households now take about a quarter of all income, according to Sachs. And wages for the average American male peaked in 1973, he says.

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5:46pm

Mon October 17, 2011
Business

Pipeline Powerhouse? Kinder Morgan To Buy El Paso

Texas-based energy company Kinder Morgan plans to buy El Paso Corp. in a $20.7 billion deal that's expected to create America's largest natural gas pipeline operator.

The deal would more than double the size of Kinder Morgan's existing pipeline network to 80,000 miles. The company's pipelines in Texas, the Midwest and the Rocky Mountains will be joined to El Paso's vast network which stretches from the Gulf Coast east to New England and west to California.

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Robert Benincasa is a computer-assisted reporting producer in NPR's Investigations Unit.

Since joining NPR in 2008, Benincasa has been reporting on NPR Investigations stories, analyzing data for investigations, and developing data visualizations and interactive applications for NPR.org. He has worked on numerous groundbreaking stories, including an exclusive on the independence level of nursing home residents, the safety of automated aircraft, and a government mandate to produce $1 coins that Americans don't want.

Prior to NPR, Benincasa served as the database editor for the Gannett News Service Washington Bureau for a decade. In 1995, he joined the Burlington VT Free Press as a staff writer.

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