4:00am

Mon October 17, 2011
NPR Story

Egyptians Fear Arab Spring Progress Is Slipping Away

Steve Inskeep talks to best-selling Egyptian novelist and political activist Alaa Al Aswany about whether the Arab Spring gains are being eroded by Islamists and the military.

12:01am

Mon October 17, 2011
Author Interviews

Whitehead's 'Zone' Is No Average Zombie Apocalypse

Originally published on Mon October 17, 2011 5:20 am

Colson Whitehead is also the author of The Intuitionist, John Henry Days, Apex Hides the Hurt and Sag Harbor.

Erin Patrice O'Brien Doubleday

If you ask Colson Whitehead to describe the man at the center of his new novel, Zone One, he'll tell you: "It's about a guy just trying to make it to the next day without being killed — so it's about New Yorkers."

But character Mark Spitz isn't just any New Yorker. He's one of the only human survivors of a mysterious plague that has swept the world, turning billions of people into zombies. New York is devastated and Spitz is charged with clearing the undead from lower Manhattan.

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12:01am

Mon October 17, 2011
Crisis In The Housing Market

Housing Recovery At Various Stages Around The U.S.

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Realtor Lee Brown says Charlotte, N.C., has a whole community of "starter castles," which were built during the housing boom. One foreclosed home is expected to go for about half the value it was in 2007.

Michael Tomsic

The housing market may be getting more attractive for buying a home. Foreclosures continue to rise, but prices are stabilizing in some places across the country. Just as communities experienced the housing bubble differently, they are also feeling varying degrees of recovery.

Charlotte: 'Two Chandeliers In The Dining Room'

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12:01am

Mon October 17, 2011
2 Languages, Many Voices: Latinos In The U.S.

For A Bilingual Writer, 'No One True Language'

Gustavo Perez Firmat is a Cuban-American who writes novels, memoirs, poetry, and academic works in both Spanish and English. "But I have the feeling that I'm not fluent in either one," he says. "Words fail me in both languages."

Perez Firmat, who is also a professor at Columbia University, says that being bilingual can be both a blessing and a burden.

"I don't have one true language," Perez Firmat tells Morning Edition co-host Renee Montagne.

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12:01am

Mon October 17, 2011
Barack Obama

Obama Bus Tour Rides Rough Political Terrain In N.C.

President Obama begins a campaign-style bus tour Monday in North Carolina and Virginia to try to drum up support for his jobs bill and his re-election campaign.

He starts in the Tar Heel State, which he won by a narrow margin in 2008 and where he now faces a struggle to stay competitive for 2012.

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12:01am

Mon October 17, 2011
Digital Life

Apps For Exercise, Eating And Sending Postcards

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 9:05 am

Six new apps — clockwise from top left, Chefs Feed, Anthill, Chewsy, Fitocracy, Postagram and RunKeeper — can help you exercise, find food, or just kill time.

NPR

Part of an occasional series on mobile apps.

Today's smartphones have applications that can help you track your latest jogging route — and find a place to eat afterward. And if you snap a nice picture along the way, they'll even let you use that to make a postcard.

Talking about the latest roundup of amazing apps, Slate's tech columnist Farhad Manjoo tells NPR's Steve Inskeep that as a new father, he's been trying out new apps as he sits awake with his young son in the middle of the night.

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12:01am

Mon October 17, 2011
Crisis In The Housing Market

Housing Market Stuck Despite Low Prices, Rates

Originally published on Mon October 17, 2011 10:32 am

A bank-owned sign is seen in front of a foreclosed home in Miami. Florida was among the hardest hit states in the real estate collapse.

Joe Raedle Getty Images

Three years ago, the real estate market was simple — simply terrible, that is. In virtually every part of the country, foreclosures were shooting up and prices were plunging. Today, the real estate picture is more nuanced. Foreclosures are still rising, but prices are stabilizing in some markets, making home-buying look more attractive.

If you had talked to some good economists just before the housing bubble burst, they would have told you it didn't make sense to buy a house.

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12:01am

Mon October 17, 2011
Africa

Misrata Militia Restricts Who May Enter Libyan City

Originally published on Mon October 17, 2011 11:15 am

A check point between Misrata and Beni Walid, Libya.

Lopez Jean Baptiste SIPA

Forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi terrorized the Libyan city of Misrata during the civil war. Because it never fell, the city became an icon of the revolution. But Misrata now is gaining a reputation for a militia that is carrying out acts of vengeance, looting and restricting movements in and out of the city.

Wags now quip that a visa is needed to enter Misrata because of the tight restrictions on access to the large coastal city. But it's no joke to the people here.

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12:01am

Mon October 17, 2011
The Salt

Look Who's Going Gluten-Free

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 9:25 am

French Laundry pastry chef Lena Kwak with the gluten-free flour she developed.

Sara Davis Thomas Keller Restaurant Group

Gluten-free isn't just for natural foodies anymore. It's gone mainstream. So much so, it's even been embraced by restaurateur Thomas Keller, one of the nation's top chefs (he's the only one with three Michelin stars for two restaurants).

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12:01am

Mon October 17, 2011
Politics

Times Have Changed Since Reagan's 1986 Tax Reform

The clock is ticking down on Capitol Hill as a congressional super committee has only until Thanksgiving to agree on a plan shrinking deficits by more than a trillion dollars. The entire Congress then has to pass it by Christmas Eve or face huge across-the-board spending cuts.

Twenty-five years ago, another politically-divided Congress approved the biggest tax code overhaul in the nation's history. But much has changed since then.

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