7:59am

Wed October 12, 2011
The Two-Way

Top Stories: Terror Plot, Baghdad Bombings, Republican Debate

Good morning.

Our early headline today was a follow to the news about an alleged plan by two Iranians to kill Saudi Arabia's ambassador to the U.S.:

Alleged Terror Plot: 'Brazen And Bizarre'

As for other stories making headlines (and we'll have more about some of them later), they include:

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7:47am

Wed October 12, 2011
Politics and Government

Bad year on Wall St. could have negative impact on state budget

The State Comptroller finds that Wall Street is having another bad year, and that could have a negative impact on New York State's budget.

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7:34am

Wed October 12, 2011
Environment

Dan Grossman on The Campbell Conversations

Dan Grossman is a freelance environmental journalist who has frequently appeared on public radio and the BBC, and has written for the New York Times, Rolling Stone, and Scientific American. He’s won a host of prestigious awards and been funded by many highly respected organizations—among them the Peabody award, the National Science Foundation, and the Fund for Investigative Journalism.

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7:30am

Wed October 12, 2011
The Two-Way

Alleged Terror Plot: 'Brazen And Bizarre'

This courtroom drawing shows Manssor Arbabsiar (front, right), appearing before U.S. Southern District Court Judge Michael H. Dolinger on Tuesday.

Shirley Shepard AFP/Getty Images

Two words — brazen and bizarre — come to mind about the alleged plot by two Iranians to hire members of a Mexican drug cartel to kill the Saudi ambassador to the U.S. and possibly bomb the Saudi and Israeli embassies in Washington, NPR's Tom Gjelten said earlier today on Morning Edition.

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7:27am

Wed October 12, 2011
Regional Coverage

Onondaga County lawmakers pass budget, cut funding for Air One helicopter

They worked later into the evening Tuesday, but Onondaga County lawmakers passed a budget that cut more than $5 million from County Executive Joanie Mahoney's proposed budget.

Property taxes will go up in most county towns, but will go down in every village except Fabius. Residents in the towns of Clay and Salina will see the biggest tax increases. 

Republican Kevin Holmquist of Manlius says it took weeks of work to take the 3 villages he represents from a 10% tax increase to a 5% tax decrease.

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7:15am

Wed October 12, 2011
Politics and Government

Jean Bethke Elshtain on The Campbell Conversations

Jean Bethke Elshtain

What is the state of American democracy?  What are the roots of our democratic shortcomings, and what do we need to do to improve the health of the political process?  Jean Bethke Elshtain, democratic theorist, ethicist, and noted public intellectual at the University of Chicago—and author of Democracy on Trial—wrestles with these mighty questions in this substantively rich interview.  Elshtain has also written an influential book on just war—Just War Against Terror—and she considers the American involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan through that lens.  Was the war justif

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6:59am

Wed October 12, 2011
Around the Nation

Corn Maze Baffles Family Of Four

Bob Connors tells the Boston Globe he designed the seven-acre maze in Danvers, Mass., so people would get lost. Apparently it worked because a family of four became completely disoriented. In a final act of desperation, they called 911 from inside the maze.

6:56am

Wed October 12, 2011
History

World's Oldest Running Car Sells For $4.5 Million

In 1887, the French-made motor car La Marquise was in the first automobile race. It is still running. The car got a standing ovation when it was driven onstage at a recent auction, and a winning bid of more than $4.5 million.

4:00am

Wed October 12, 2011
Middle East

Hamas, Israel Reach Deal To Swap Prisoners

The Israeli government and the Palestinian militant group Hamas have agreed to a prisoner exchange. Hamas says Israel will free more than 1,000 Palestinian prisoners in exchange for Gilad Schalit, the Israeli soldier captured by Hamas militants and held in Gaza for more than five years.

4:00am

Wed October 12, 2011
NPR Story

Economic Progress Lags For U.S. Born Children Of Mexican Immigrants

Since the last decade, there are now more Hispanic children of immigrants in the United States than actual immigrants. That should translate into more progress — educationally and economically. But Steve Trejo, an economist at the University of Texas at Austin, tells Renee Montagne that while the second generation does better than the first, the third generation doesn't fare as well.

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