1:33pm

Sun October 9, 2011
Middle East

Riots Over Church Attack In Egypt Kill 19

Massive clashes that drew in Christians angry over a recent church attack, Muslims, and Egyptian security forces raged over a large section of downtown Cairo Sunday night, leaving at least 19 people dead and more than 150 injured, Health Ministry officials said. It was the worst violence since the 18-day uprising that ousted Hosni Mubarak in February.

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1:10pm

Sun October 9, 2011
Author Interviews

Quest For The Holy Doughnut, And The First Dessert

OK, forget the vegetables. It's time for dessert.

And not just any dessert ... the oldest dessert in New York City. No, not those rock-hard doughnuts from the corner coffee cart. We're talking about the kinds of sweets people would have been eating 500, 1,000, even 2,000 years ago.

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10:14am

Sun October 9, 2011
Pop Culture

Paul McCartney Might Get Married Today

Security barriers have been put in place outside Marylebone Town Hall in central London in anticipation that Paul McCartney will marry American heiress Nancy Shevell there.

The couple announced their engagement earlier this year. Shevell, 51, would be the former Beatle's third wife.

The couple are reported to be planning a Sunday afternoon reception at McCartney's house nearby in the St. John's Wood neighborhood.

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8:03am

Sun October 9, 2011
Reporter's Notebook

In Tripoli, Gadhafi's Palace Becomes People's Market

Originally published on Sun October 16, 2011 10:50 am

Libyans visit the destroyed Bab al-Azizia military barracks and compound of their country's ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi, in the southern suburbs of Tripoli, Libya.

Bela Szandelszky AP

From presidential palace to people's market — in Libya, Moammar Gadhafi's compound in the heart of Tripoli has been put to new use, as NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro explains in this Reporter's Notebook.

For most Libyans, Bab al-Azizia was the most foreboding address in the country. Moammar Gadhafi gave some of his most defiant speeches from the sprawling compound in Tripoli.

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8:00am

Sun October 9, 2011
Around the Nation

Ex-Employee Caught Putting National Archives On eBay

A former longtime employee of the National Archives pleaded guilty this week to stealing almost a thousand audio recordings belonging to the federal government. The stolen goods range from radio episodes of Dragnet and Gunsmoke to a 1937 recording of Babe Ruth hunting. Host Audie Cornish has the story.

8:00am

Sun October 9, 2011
Election 2012

Values Voters Call The Tune For GOP Campaign

Originally published on Sun October 16, 2011 10:50 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, host: And now I'm joined by Mara Liasson, NPR's national political correspondent. Hi there, Mara.

MARA LIASSON: Hi, Audie.

CORNISH: So, as we just heard, a new controversy for Rick Perry this weekend, after evangelical leader Robert Jeffress, who's a Perry supporter, said that Mormonism is a cult. And he did this when he was speaking with reporters at the Values Voter Summit. First, let me just play a clip of that tape.

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8:00am

Sun October 9, 2011
Sports

Oakland Raiders' Al Davis, A 'True Legend' Of The Game

Longtime Oakland Raiders owner Al Davis, whose maverick style had a huge impact on professional football, has died. The 82-year-old saw his team win three Super Bowls. His independent streak was both admired and excoriated, but stubbornness in his later years was blamed for the team's struggles. NPR's Allison Keyes has this remembrance.

8:00am

Sun October 9, 2011
Middle East

Damascus Roils As Protests, Violence Continue

Syria on Friday issued a warning to other countries in the world not to recognize the newly-formed Syrian National Council. For the last seven months, protesters have been trying to force changes in the regime of President Bashar al-Assad. So far Assad has resisted change, often forcefully. NPR's Deborah Amos was given rare permission to visit the Syrian capital of Damascus this week, and updates host Audie Cornish on the state of the uprising.

8:00am

Sun October 9, 2011
Europe

Germany Reopens Nazi War Criminal Investigations

In 1977, the family of retired autoworker John Demjanjuk was astounded when he was accused of having been a guard known as "Ivan the Terrible" at a Nazi death camp in World War II. His case was considered the last of the Nazi war crimes trials, but this week, prosecutors in Germany said they were reopening hundreds of investigations. Host Audie Cornish talks with historian Deborah Lipstadt about how that might play out.

8:00am

Sun October 9, 2011
Education

Undercover Student Tests A For-Profit College

Lately, for-profit colleges like DeVry, Kaplan and the University of Phoenix have been subject to scrutiny and new regulations for allegedly deceptive recruiting tactics and the high number of federal loan defaults among their students. Host Audie Cornish talks to Christopher Beha, who discreetly enrolled as a student at the University of Phoenix, and wrote about it in a piece in this month's issue of Harper's Magazine.

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