12:33pm

Fri October 14, 2011
Around the Nation

For Wall Street Protests, What Constitutes Success?

Demonstrators associated with the Occupy Wall Street movement face off with police Friday in the streets of New York City's financial district.

Spencer Platt Getty Images

Wall Street protesters avoided a showdown Friday that could have forced them from their Manhattan camp, but they still face the same question that would have confronted them if they had been evicted: Where do they go from here?

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12:24pm

Fri October 14, 2011
Business

A Twitter Push To Keep Chiquita From Splitting Town

Cincinnati and Charlotte, N.C., are similar in size and culture, and now they are going head to head in an effort to gain the favor of Chiquita. The fruit company is considering moving its Cincinnati headquarters, taking more than 300 jobs with it.

Residents of both cities refuse to sit idly by. They have taken to Twitter to communicate directly with the company's chief executive officer, Fernando Aguirre.

Aguirre spends a lot of time tweeting, from talking about his job to complimenting people to commenting on baseball.

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12:00pm

Fri October 14, 2011
Arts & Life

Comic Conventions Not Just For Nerds

People from across the country are gathering at the 2011 New York Comic Con to share their love of comics, anime, games, graphic novels and more. Michel Martin gets the dish on this year's event from Latoya Peterson, editor of the blog Racialicious.com and an anime fan who's attending the convention.

12:00pm

Fri October 14, 2011
Faith Matters

The Sikh Religion, Through The Camera Lens

The 8th Annual Sikh International Film Festival is a two-day event that aims to raise awareness about the Sikh faith and community. Despite tens of thousands of adherents living in the U.S., Americans know very little about the faith, and often associate Sikhs with Muslims. Michel Martin speaks with film festival chair Paul Johar.

12:00pm

Fri October 14, 2011
History

Marches On Washington Still Making A Difference?

Thousands are expected to attend Rev. Al Sharpton's march for jobs and justice Saturday on the National Mall. The rally is scheduled a day before the dedication of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial. The nation's capital has been historically commonplace for hosting marches that express views ranging from women's equality to anti-war and animal rights. Michel Martin explores the history and the impact of marches on Washington with NPR Senior Washington Editor Ron Elving and University of Pennsylvania History Professor Mary Frances Berry.

12:00pm

Fri October 14, 2011
Barbershop

'Shop Talk': Tea Party Battles 'Occupy Wall Street'

GOP presidential hopeful Herman Cain surges to the top of the polls. The Tea Party is launching a counter-offensive against the Occupy Wall Street movement. And Detroit sports teams are enjoying exceptional seasons. Weighing in are the Barbershop guys: author Jimi Izrael, attorney Arsalan Iftikhar, columnist Ruben Navarratte and political science professor Lester Spence.

12:00pm

Fri October 14, 2011
BackTalk

Listeners Weigh In On 'Tanning Of America'

Host Michel Martin and Tell Me More Editor Ammad Omar comb through listener feedback on this week's segment about Steve Stoute's new book that explores hip-hop's influence on big business. They also discuss updates to the Cherokee Nation election, the elections in Liberia and a new development for 'Real Life Super Hero' Phoenix Jones.

11:17am

Fri October 14, 2011
The Two-Way

Listen Up: Here's How Some Piranhas Bark Before They Bite

A red-bellied piranha. You don't want to hear one.

Joel Saget AFP/Getty Images

We're not recommending you dive in to some South American stream to see if you can hear them do this, but this is just too interesting not to pass along.

National Geographic writes that:

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11:01am

Fri October 14, 2011
Asia

Judge Resigns, Casting Doubt Over Khmer Rouge Trials

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 12:05 pm

In this undated photo, a man cleans a skull near a mass grave at the Choeung Ek camp outside Phnom Penh, Cambodia — the best known of the killing fields run by the Khmer Rouge in the middle and late 1970s. Now, Cambodians are skeptical that a U.N.-backed tribunal will be able to deliver justice in the case of four remaining high-level Khmer Rouge officials.

Jeff Widener AP

Long running and frequently delayed, the legal cases against former leaders of the Khmer Rouge are now in danger of being terminated before many of their victims get the justice they've sought.

A German judge resigned this month from the U.N.-backed Khmer Rouge tribunal. The judge, Siegfried Blunk, felt Cambodian officials were obstructing efforts to investigate the crimes of the Khmer Rouge, which is believed to have killed as many as 2 million of its own citizens between 1975 and 1979.

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10:44am

Fri October 14, 2011
The Salt

Scientists Seek To Break Aquaculture's Fish-Eat-Fish Chain

Originally published on Fri October 14, 2011 10:25 am

Fish feed contains fishmeal and fish oil

Kristofor Husted NPR

Aquaculture, one of the fastest growing sectors of agriculture in the U.S., combats the global dilemma of depleting wild fish populations. But a new report from the group Food & Water Watch says factory fish farms risk the health of other, stable species swimming in the sea. One of the biggest problems? The fish food.

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