7:10pm

Sun October 9, 2011
Environment

To Save Wildlife, Namibia's Farmers Take Control

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 9:02 pm

Spooked by a noise, giraffes in northwest Namibia interrupt lunch to look around.
John W. Poole NPR

It's dawn and 40 degrees out. The air tastes of dust. Elias Neftali is behind the wheel of a truck, driving us through a long valley encircled by red-rock mountains. As a farmhand in the northwest desert of Namibia, Neftali used to shoot wild animals trying to eat his livestock.

Now he protects wild animals. And that can be scary.

"Oh my god, yep," he says. He tells me about a night he was sleeping in a bungalow out in the bush with some other wildlife guards.

Read more

6:20pm

Sun October 9, 2011
Business

When A Country Defaults, Who Comes Knocking?

Protesters in Argentina in 2001 wave national flags as they walk through tear gas and smoke from burning street fires set by demonstrators during the country's financial crisis.

Daniel Garcia AFP/Getty Images

We all know what happens when individuals stop paying their bills: angry letters, pestering phone calls and possibly getting property repossessed. In the end, there's you might declare bankruptcy and start again. That's how it works for a person up to his eyeballs in debt, but how does it work for an entire country?

Harvard economist Ken Rogoff says that it's not unusual for countries to go into default. In fact, he says it's happened hundreds of times.

Read more

4:39pm

Sun October 9, 2011
Sports

Weighty Challenge: A Lineman's Life After Football

Former NFL offensive lineman Ben Lynch playing for the San Francisco 49ers.

Bill Fox Bill Fox

Orlando "Zeus" Brown, an offensive lineman for the Cleveland Browns and the Baltimore Ravens, was found dead late last month in his Baltimore apartment. The cause: diabetic ketoacidosis, common among those with diabetes.

Brown was 6 feet 7 inches tall and 360 pounds when he played in the NFL. That may sound like a lot for a football player, but it's not uncommon among today's offensive and defensive lineman, who rarely weigh less than 300 pounds.

Read more

4:15pm

Sun October 9, 2011
Around the Nation

Ashes To Ammo: How To Reload Your Dead Loved One

Thad Holmes and Clem Parnell's company Holy Smoke takes your loved one's ashes and turns them into ammunition.

Courtesy of Thad Holmes

When a loved one dies and is cremated, family members face a tough decision on what do with the ashes. Some want the final resting place to be spectacular — spread in the Grand Canyon, launched into space, sprinkled in Times Square; others just keep Aunt Jane's remains in an urn at home.

"The ashes get put on the mantel, stay there for a couple of years, and then a couple of years later, they get put in the attic," says Thad Holmes. "A few years later, the house gets sold and, 'Oh gosh, we forgot the ashes!'"

Read more

3:00pm

Sun October 9, 2011
Middle East

At Least 19 Dead In Egypt Riots

Clashes between Coptic Christian protesters and the Egyptian military in Cairo on Sunday left at least 19 people dead and more than 100 wounded, according to official counts. The violence erupted after the Christians were marching to protest what they claim was an attack on a church in southern Egypt by radical Muslims.

2:44pm

Sun October 9, 2011
Music Interviews

Bjork's 'Biophilia': Interactive Music, Pushing Boundaries

Bjork's new album, Biophilia, is also an interactive multimedia project.

Inez van Lamsweerde & Vinoodh Matadin

The title of Bjork's new album came to her after she read a book by neurologist Oliver Sachs about the mind's empathy for music.

"He called it 'musicophilia,' she says. "Obviously, I make music, but I wanted to do a project about nature. So I thought, if I call it Biophilia, it's sort of empathy with nature."

So there are song titles like "Solstice," "Dark Matter" and "Crystalline." The lyrics actually touch on processes in nature — for instance, how crystals grow.

Read more

2:42pm

Sun October 9, 2011
Asia

Caterpillar Fungus: The Viagra Of The Himalayas

Caterpillar fungus in the ground, partially exposed.

Daniel Winkler

In the produce aisle at your local grocery story, button mushrooms go for about $4 a pound, Shitakes cost about twice that, and black truffles can run $800 a pound.

But that's nothing compared to a rare Asian fungus that sells for $50,000 a pound.

In English, it's called caterpillar fungus. But it's better known throughout Asia by the Tibetan term, yartsa gunbu, which means "summer grass, winter worm."

Read more

2:41pm

Sun October 9, 2011
Strange News

Florida Family's Antique Legacy: Pickled Cucumber

Originally published on Sun October 9, 2011 6:39 pm

James Boyle's great-great-grandmother bottled this pickle in 1876, and the family has been passing it down ever since.

James Boyle

Here's a partial list of things that happened in 1876:

It was, of course, the nation's 100th birthday. George Armstrong Custer met his fate at the Battle of Little Bighorn. Alexander Graham Bell made the first phone call. A giant squid, 18 feet long, washed up on a beach in Newfoundland.

And James Boyle's great-great-grandmother grew a very special cucumber in her Illinois garden. She put the sprouting vine in an old medicine bottle, so the cucumber grew inside it.

Read more

1:33pm

Sun October 9, 2011
Middle East

Riots Over Church Attack In Egypt Kill 19

Massive clashes that drew in Christians angry over a recent church attack, Muslims, and Egyptian security forces raged over a large section of downtown Cairo Sunday night, leaving at least 19 people dead and more than 150 injured, Health Ministry officials said. It was the worst violence since the 18-day uprising that ousted Hosni Mubarak in February.

Read more

1:10pm

Sun October 9, 2011
Author Interviews

Quest For The Holy Doughnut, And The First Dessert

OK, forget the vegetables. It's time for dessert.

And not just any dessert ... the oldest dessert in New York City. No, not those rock-hard doughnuts from the corner coffee cart. We're talking about the kinds of sweets people would have been eating 500, 1,000, even 2,000 years ago.

Read more

Pages