3:00pm

Fri September 9, 2011
NPR Story

How One Mistake Can Leave Millions Without Power

San Diego's power company has restored power to all of its customers. Thursday afternoon, more than 4 million people in the Southwestern U.S. and parts of Mexico lost electricity. Arizona Public Service Company says the outage occurred after an electrical worker mistakenly removed a piece of monitoring equipment at a substation in southwest Arizona.

3:00pm

Fri September 9, 2011
Economy

Obama's Jobs Plan Versus GOP Rivals' Plans

President Obama and two of his GOP opponents in next year's election have laid out their ideas to turn the economy around. NPR's Scott Horsley joins Robert Siegel to compare and contrast the plans.

1:52pm

Fri September 9, 2011
Music Interviews

Beirut: A Jet-Setter Settles Down

Beirut's latest album is The Rip Tide. Zach Condon, the band's leader, says the title was inspired by a real-life brush with a life-threatening ocean wave.
Kristianna Smith

Zach Condon says he was half-joking when he named his band Beirut: "I was kind of poking fun at myself," he says with a chuckle, "and some of my more exotic tastes in music at the time."

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1:21pm

Fri September 9, 2011
The Two-Way

Nuclear Regulatory Commission OKs Closure Of Yucca Mountain

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission handed down a long awaited decision today that allows the Obama administration to continue its plans to close Yucca Mountain, the nuclear waste dump in Nevada.

The AP reports:

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1:00pm

Fri September 9, 2011
Science

Rainfall Brings Bumper Crop Of Fungi

With record-breaking rainfall in the northeast in the last few weeks, mycologists say that mushroom numbers seem to be up this year. Wet weather is prime for mushroom emergence because the fruits of fungi form through a hydraulic process, says Nicholas Money of Miami University in Ohio.

1:00pm

Fri September 9, 2011
Research News

A Virus That Affects Caterpillar Behavior

When infected by a virus known as baculovirus, gypsy moth caterpillars mysteriously climb for the treetops. They then die and scatter viral particles, infecting their comrades below. Entomologist Kelli Hoover discusses the insects' behavioral change and the benefits to the virus.

1:00pm

Fri September 9, 2011
Health

The Psychology of 9/11, Ten Years Later

Immediately after the Sept. 11 attacks, many first responders and other victims received psychological care. Ira Flatow and guests look at the psychological effects of 9/11, and what researchers have learned since then about caring for victims of psychological trauma.

1:00pm

Fri September 9, 2011
Space

'Move An Asteroid' Competition May Help Protect Planet

How would you deflect an asteroid if it were hurtling towards Earth? A competition run by the Space Generation Advisory Council asks students and young professionals to submit their ideas. Competition winner Alison Gibbings shares her idea for a 'smart cloud' that would slow down an asteroid.

1:00pm

Fri September 9, 2011
Humans

Examining Ancient Fossils for Clues to Human Origins

Several papers published this week in the journal Science look at fossilized bones from the hands, feet, pelvis, and other parts of the prehistoric hominid Australopithecus sediba. Paleoanthropologists Lee Berger and Bernard Wood discuss what the research means for our understanding of the human family tree.

12:58pm

Fri September 9, 2011
The Two-Way

Report: U.K. Police Protected Gadhafi's Son From Assassination Plot In 2004

This morning The Guardian has a report about a 2004 incident concerning one of Moammar Gadhafi's most prominent children. Based on documents the paper found in Gadhafi's compound in Libya, The Guardian reports that in 2004, the United Kingdom offered Saif Al-Islam Gadhafi protection after the government uncovered an assassination plot.

The Guardian reports:

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