8:00am

Sat August 20, 2011
Middle East

Key Victories Build Libyan Rebels' Momentum

Libya's six-month-long civil war may well be in its final days. Rebel fighters appear to be in their strongest position yet, as Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi becomes more isolated. Guest host Jacki Lyden talks with NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro.

6:48am

Sat August 20, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Bill Clinton's Life As A Vegan

Looking fit: Former President Bill Clinton, seen here in May, has lost more than 20 pounds since going vegan.
Joe Klamar AFP/Getty Images

Bill Clinton became renowned on the campaign trail for his ability to snarf up burgers and fries. Heart bypass surgery convinced him to cut back on the grease. In the past year, Clinton's gone even further: He's gone vegan.

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Anthony Brooks has more than twenty five years of experience in public radio, working as a producer, editor, reporter, and most recently, as a fill-in host for NPR. For years, Brooks has worked as a Boston-based reporter for NPR, covering regional issues across New England, including politics, criminal justice, and urban affairs. He has also covered higher education for NPR, and during the 2000 presidential election he was one of NPR's lead political reporters, covering the campaign from the early primaries through the Supreme Court's Bush V. Gore ruling. His reports have been heard for many years on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

6:00am

Sat August 20, 2011
Middle East

As U.S. Prepares To Leave, Iraq Remains A Flash Point

An Iraqi man inspects damages at the Mar Afram Syriac Orthodox Church after an explosion in the northern city of Kirkuk on Aug. 15. Iraq continues to be hit by violence as most U.S. forces prepare to leave by the end of the year.
Marwan Ibrahim AFP/Getty Images

Iraq has turned into a back-burner issue, but there's still plenty to worry about in a country that remains far from stable.

Attacks across the country this week raised a host of questions about the ability of Iraq's security forces to maintain control. There are still nearly 50,000 American troops stationed in the country. But their primary mission now is to train Iraqi soldiers, and most of the U.S. forces are scheduled to leave by Dec. 31 under an agreement between the U.S. and Iraqi governments.

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6:00am

Sat August 20, 2011
Sports

A Little Luck Is 'Not A Bad Thing' In Baseball

In baseball, it's better to be lucky than good, according to Bill Buckner. He should know. Buckner was very good. He was an All-Star Gold Glove first baseman who played 22 years in the major leagues, including four seasons for the Boston Red Sox.

This summer, Buckner is back in baseball and back in New England, where he's reminded that 22 years of being good can't erase one moment of being unlucky.

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5:50am

Sat August 20, 2011
Animals

Doggone It! Canine Thefts On The Rise

Dognappings have risen 49 percent in the U.S. in 2011, according to data gathered by the American Kennel Club.

"We believe the increase is due to economic times," Lisa Peterson, a spokesperson for the nonprofit group, which has been tracking pet theft for several years, tells Weekend Edition Saturday guest host Jacki Lyden.

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5:00am

Sat August 20, 2011
Race To The Arctic

Trying To Unravel The Mysteries Of Arctic Warming

A polar bear makes its way across the ice in Canada's Northwest Passage. Melting ice in the Arctic will make survival increasingly difficult for wildlife in the region.
Jackie Northam NPR

The Arctic is heating up faster than anyplace on Earth. And as it heats, the ice is growing thinner and melting faster. Scientists say that sometime this century, the Arctic Ocean could be free of ice during the summers. And that transition is likely to be chaotic.

Arctic sea ice has always seen dramatic swings. Every winter, the ocean is completely covered with ice. It starts to melt in the late spring, and by September about half that ice has melted away.

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7:51pm

Fri August 19, 2011
Sports

NCAA Chief Discusses 'Death Penalty,' Miami Case

NCAA President Mark Emmert says he's willing to back up his tough talk on punishing rule-breakers — even using the "death penalty" as a deterrent.

With salacious allegations swirling around Miami's football program, and one week after Emmert joined with university presidents to discuss toughening sanctions against cheating schools, the NCAA's leader said he believed the infractions committee should make the harshest penalty an option.

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6:39pm

Fri August 19, 2011
Around the Nation

Does More Jobs Mean More Government Spending?

US President Barack Obama listens to questions as he speaks at a town hall style meeting in Decorah, Iowa, August 15, 2011, during his three-day bus tour in the Midwest centering on ways to grow the economy.
JIM WATSON AFP/Getty Images

President Obama's bus tour across the Midwest this week could probably be summed up this way: jobs vs. deficits. Americans are clamoring for action on both, but action on jobs might mean more spending, which is a toxic word in Washington, as well as for many small-business owners.

A Small-Business Owner's Struggle

Terry Frank and her husband own a shop that sells everything from sandwiches to desserts on the Oak Ridge Turnpike in Oak Ridge, Tenn.

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6:31pm

Fri August 19, 2011
Africa

UN: 300,000 Children At 'Risk Of Dying' In Somalia

Children run toward workers distributing hot meals in Mogadishu Thursday. Some 12 million people in parts of Ethiopia, Djibouti, Kenya, Uganda and Somalia are at risk of starvation in the wake of the region's worst drought in decades.
Roberto Schmidt AFP/Getty Images

More than 300,000 children in the Horn of Africa are severely malnourished "and in imminent risk of dying" because of drought and famine, the head of the U.N. children's agency said Friday.

The United Nations says that tens of thousands of people have died in Somalia, Kenya, Ethiopia and Djibouti — and the organization warns that the famine hasn't peaked. More than 12 million people in the region need food aid, according to the U.N.

"The crisis in the Horn of Africa is a human disaster becoming a human catastrophe," UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake told reporters.

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