Ira Glass started working in public radio in 1978, when he was 19, as an intern at NPR's headquarters in DC. Over the next 17 years, he worked on nearly every NPR news show and did nearly every production job they had: tape-cutter, desk assistant, newscast writer, editor, producer, reporter, and substitute host. He spent a year in a high school for NPR, and a year in an elementary school, filing stories for All Things Considered. He moved to Chicago in 1989 and put This American Life on the air in 1995.

This American Life

Built around the innovative personal vision of host Ira Glass, "This American Life," quite literally, pioneered a new kind of radio storytelling. The weekly program explores a theme — fiascos, conventions, the job that takes over your life — through a playful mix of radio monologues, mini-documentaries, "found tape," short fiction and unusual music.

Tom and Ray Magliozzi, the Peabody Award-winning hosts of Car Talk on NPR, are better known as "Click and Clack, the Tappet Brothers" — taking their names from the clickety-clack sound made by aging autos. Tom, 71, and Ray, 59, dispense car advice in the broad accents of the tough East Cambridge neighborhood where they grew up. Both are graduates of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

In 1973, the brothers opened a do-it-yourself garage in Cambridge, Massachusetts. "Hacker's Haven" provided rented space and tools for clients fixing their own cars. But as hippies turned into yuppies and car repair became more complicated, "Hacker's Haven" turned into the "Good News Garage," a conventional car repair service.

Tom and Ray Magliozzi, the Peabody Award-winning hosts of Car Talk on NPR, are better known as "Click and Clack, the Tappet Brothers" — taking their names from the clickety-clack sound made by aging autos. Tom, 71, and Ray, 59, dispense car advice in the broad accents of the tough East Cambridge neighborhood where they grew up. Both are graduates of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

In 1973, the brothers opened a do-it-yourself garage in Cambridge, Massachusetts. "Hacker's Haven" provided rented space and tools for clients fixing their own cars. But as hippies turned into yuppies and car repair became more complicated, "Hacker's Haven" turned into the "Good News Garage," a conventional car repair service.

Car Talk

For more than two decades, Tom and Ray Magliozzi (aka Click and Clack, the Tappet Brothers) have been America's funniest auto mechanics. By making more than 4 million weekly listeners laugh, they have become the defining voices of public radio weekends.

For more information, visit the Car Talk website.

Their mixture of honesty, authenticity, knowledge, and humor has won them numerous awards (including a Peabody), accolades from every major national publication, and the loyalty of millions of public radio listeners.

Prior to moving into the host position in the fall of 2011, Cornish reported from Capitol Hill for NPR News, covering issues and power in both the House and Senate and specializing in financial industry policy. She was part of NPR's six-person reporting team during the 2008 presidential election, and had a featured role in coverage of the Democratic National Convention in Denver.

Cornish comes to Washington, D.C., from Nashville, where she covered a 10-state territory in the South for NPR, including many states left reeling by the 2005 hurricane season. She has also covered the aftermath of other disasters, including the deaths of several miners in West Virginia in 2006, as well as the tornadoes that struck Tennessee in 2006 and Alabama in 2007.

Weekend Edition Sunday

Conceived as a cross between a Sunday newspaper and CBS' Sunday Morning with Charles Kuralt, Weekend Edition Sunday features interviews with newsmakers, artists, scientists, politicians, musicians, writers, theologians and historians. The program has covered news events from Nelson Mandela's 1990 release from a South African prison to the capture of Saddam Hussein.

5:29pm

Sat August 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Some New Yorkers Look On Irene's Bright Side

People stand in line at a Trader Joe's Wine Shop in Manhattan Friday, ahead of Hurricane Irene's arrival in New York City this weekend.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Parts of New York City are under evacuation orders, with more than 370,000 people ordered to leave low-lying areas as Hurricane Irene approaches the city. But on Saturday afternoon, at least, some residents were making the most of it.

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Weekend Edition Saturday


Saturday mornings are made for Weekend Edition Saturday, the program wraps up the week's news and offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories. The two-hour program is hosted by NPR's Peabody Award-winning Scott Simon.

Drawing on his experience in covering 10 wars and stories in all 50 states and seven continents, Simon brings a humorous, sophisticated and often moving perspective to each show. He is as comfortable having a conversation with a major world leader as he is talking with a Hollywood celebrity or the guy next door.

5:25pm

Sat August 27, 2011
Science

Is Steve Jobs One Of America's Great Innovators?

Steve Jobs, the now-former CEO of Apple, holds up an iPhone at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference in San Francisco in June 2010. Jobs announced on Wednesday that he would be resigning as CEO of Apple.
Paul Sakuma AP

Steve Jobs stepped down this week as CEO of Apple after running the company for nearly 25 years.

The very first Macintosh computer, the iPod audio player and most recently the iPad are just a few of the products Jobs has created that have changed the way millions of people live their lives.

As one of the great American innovators in recent years, comparisons can be drawn between Jobs and other great innovators like Thomas Edison and Henry Ford, both technological titans of American History.

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