12:00pm

Fri October 28, 2011
Election 2012

At Ballot, Black Mormon Couple Weighs Faith, Race

With two African-American candidates and two Mormon candidates vying for the presidency, black Mormons find themselves at the political intersection of race and religion. Host Michel Martin speaks with two black members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints: Don Harwell and his wife, Jerri, who have different political viewpoints.

12:00pm

Fri October 28, 2011
Politics

Drawing Parallels Between Tea Party And 'Occupy'

Tell Me More continues examining comparisons between the Tea Party and the Occupy Wall Street movements. Host Michel Martin is joined by Richard Harwood, founder of the Harwood Institute for Public Innovation; Shelby Blakely, citizen journalist and coordinator for the Tea Party Patriots; and Kyle Christopher, a Occupy Wall Street participant.

11:43am

Fri October 28, 2011
The Two-Way

West Virginia Prosecutor Defends Long Mine Disaster Investigation

Ken Ward of the Charleston Gazette has a story this morning featuring a rare interview with the U.S. Attorney for West Virginia, who says prosecutors are exploring more serious charges against senior Massey Energy officials in last year's deadly explosion at the company's Upper Big Branch mine.

Read more

11:37am

Fri October 28, 2011
The Salt

When Forgettable Salads Cause A Deadly Outbreak

Originally published on Fri October 28, 2011 3:31 pm

Would you remember exactly what was in this salad more than a week after eating it?

Luciana Bueno Santos (LuBueno) iStockphoto.com

Consider the last time you ordered a salad at a restaurant. What, precisely, was in it? Chances are you'll remember the biggest, brightest ingredients, like the lettuce, the tomato, maybe the grilled chicken.

But will you remember the little bits — the nuts, berries or toppings? In an age when salads increasingly aspire to be confetti-like piles of artistic greatness, you'd be pardoned if you didn't take note every morsel.

Read more

David Edelstein is a film critic for New York magazine and for NPR's Fresh Air, and an occasional commentator on film for CBS Sunday Morning. He has also written film criticism for the Village Voice, The New York Post, and Rolling Stone, and is a frequent contributor to the New York Times' Arts & Leisure section.

A member of the National Society of Film Critics, he is the author of the play Blaming Mom, and the co-author of Shooting to Kill (with producer Christine Vachon).

11:19am

Fri October 28, 2011
Movie Reviews

Shakespeare, Thompson: Stick To The Print Versions

Rhys Ifans plays the Elizabethan aristocrat Edward de Vere in Roland Emmerich's Anonymous. The movie speculates that de Vere, not Shakespeare, was the real author of the bard's works.

Reiner Bajo Columbia Pictures

Two new films show how tough it is to do justice to good writers on-screen. Johnny Depp certainly means to do right by his pal Hunter S. Thompson in The Rum Diary. He played Thompson in Terry Gilliam's rollicking but not especially watchable Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, and narrated a documentary about him.

Read more

11:19am

Fri October 28, 2011
Author Interviews

Scott Spencer: Plot Twists, Where Everything Changes

This interview was originally broadcast on Sept. 15, 2010. Man in the Woods is now available in paperback.

Many of Scott Spencer's novels feature a turning point — a dreadful, often unplanned act committed by one of the characters — after which nothing will ever be the same.

Read more

11:16am

Fri October 28, 2011
Television

'Primetime' TV, Like You've Never Seen It Before

Rainn Wilson, who plays Dwight on The Office, is featured in the new PBS miniseries America in Primetime, which examines the archetypes on television today.

PBS

Almost every time TV takes a look at itself, and tries to explore or explain what it does as a medium, the result is a major disappointment — at least to me. I want TV to take itself seriously, but it almost never does. Every show about TV is either one of those dumb "Top 100" lists that networks like E! and VH1 crank out every month, or it's a show that's built entirely around the guests it can book, the clips it can afford, and the shows on its own network it want to promote.

Read more

11:14am

Fri October 28, 2011
The Two-Way

Find Your Spot Among World's 7 Billion And Meet The 'Most Typical Person'

National Geographic's composite sketch of the world's most typical person (left) and the real Mu Li.

CBS/National Geographic

Maybe you haven't heard yet, but the world's population is set to hit 7 billion people on Monday. At least that's what the United Nations Population Fund says.

Most news outlets are already covering the story or have plans to (Morning Edition has a four-part series scheduled for next week).

Two reports this week caught our attention.

Read more

10:38am

Fri October 28, 2011
Economy

Hundreds Try To Influence The Supercommittee

Originally published on Fri October 28, 2011 5:56 pm

The line for seating in the hearing room of the supercommittee's meeting on Wednesday. An NPR review found that 619 separate interest groups have reported lobbying the group.

Tinna Knuutila Sunlight Foundation

The deficit reduction committee, the so-called supercommittee, has less than a month to agree on massive spending cuts and deficit reduction. And so the race is on — not only for lawmakers but for interest groups, trade associations and corporations. An NPR analysis finds there are hundreds of them that want to influence the outcome.

Read more

Pages