12:00pm

Mon October 10, 2011
Around the Nation

Brain Research Fuels Rethinking Of Foster Care Services

Child advocate Gary Stangler is the executive director of the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative. He's hoping to use research about the incomplete brain development of e18-year olds to extend services for foster children up to age 21. He and guest host Tony Cox discuss how the emerging science about brain development may affect foster care. Also joining the conversation is Sixto Cancel, a college student who's been in and out of foster care since he was 11 months old.

12:00pm

Mon October 10, 2011
Race

Latinos Lead Nation In Childhood Poverty

For the first time in history, whites no longer make up the single largest group of poor children in America. A new report from the Pew Hispanic Center shows that more than six million Hispanic children live in poverty. To learn more about what that means for the future of the Latino community and the nation, guest host Tony Cox speaks with Mark Lopez, co-author of the report and the associate director of the Pew Hispanic Center.

12:00pm

Mon October 10, 2011
World

Peace Prize Winner Faces Tough Re-Election Bid

Liberian President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf was one of three women who were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday. She is the first democratically elected female president on the African continent. While Johnson-Sirleaf enjoys broad global support, she faces growing criticism and a tough re-election campaign at home. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with foreign policy expert Emira Woods about the upcoming elections in Liberia and Johnson-Sirleaf's chances to hold onto power.

12:00pm

Mon October 10, 2011
History

Think You Know The Real Christopher Columbus?

Columbus Day is a national holiday, celebrated with parades and songs. While most Americans know that Columbus sailed the ocean blue, many of the facts surrounding the voyage remain misunderstood. Guest host Tony Cox speaks with historian William Fowler to set the record straight on some of the popular myths surrounding Christopher Columbus and his voyage.

11:55am

Mon October 10, 2011
Regional Coverage

Town of Salina hopes to move to new location, possibly displacing children's center

Voters in the Town of Salina will be asked to approve a referendum on November 8 to buy and renovate the Burdick Chevrolet site on Old Liverpool Road so the town can move its offices there. Town Supervisor Mark Nicotra says the town could consolidate its offices and highway department on that property for about $6 million  versus spending $8 million to repair its current properties. 

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10:58am

Mon October 10, 2011
The Two-Way

Netflix Kills Qwikster; Price Hike Lives On

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:20 am

Packages of DVDs await shipment at Netflix's headquarters in San Jose, Calif.

Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Bowing to customers' anger and confusion over its move to divide its streaming and DVD video offerings, Netflix is reversing itself, snuffing the plan to offer DVDs by mail via a new service called "Qwikster." News of the backpedaling move was published on the company's blog early Monday.

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David Bianculli is a guest host and TV critic on NPR's Fresh Air with Terry Gross. A contributor to the show since its inception, he has been a TV critic since 1975.

From 1993 to 2007, Bianculli was a TV critic for the New York Daily News.

Bianculli has written three books: Dangerously Funny: The Uncensored Story of 'The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour (Simon & Schuster/Touchstone, 2009),  Teleliteracy: Taking Television Seriously (1992), and Dictionary of Teleliteracy (1996).

An associate professor of TV and film at Rowan University in New Jersey, Bianculli is also the founder and editor of the online magazine, TVWorthWatching.com.

9:36am

Mon October 10, 2011
The Salt

In Peru, A Hunt For Chocolate Like You've Never Tasted It

Originally published on Fri October 26, 2012 1:05 pm

Farmers dry cacao beans in Uchiza, Peru, a file photo from 2008. Researchers are exploring the wild cacao bounty of Peru's Amazon Basin, part of an effort to jump-start the country's premium cacao industry.

Martin Mejia AP

Christopher Columbus first encountered the cacao bean on his final voyage to the New World some 500 years ago. It took a while for Europeans to embrace the taste — one 16th-century Spanish missionary called the chocolate that indigenous people drank "loathsome."

But by the 17th century, chocolate met sugar, and it became a hit the world over — it's now a $93 billion a year global industry, according to market research firm Mintel.

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9:32am

Mon October 10, 2011
Middle East

Clashes Spark Outrage Among Egypt's Christians

Egyptians grieve over the coffins of Coptic Christians killed during Sunday's clashes with Egyptian security forces, before beginning a funeral procession from the Coptic Hospital in Cairo.

Mahmud Hams AFP/Getty Images

Several hundred Christians pelted police with rocks outside a Cairo hospital Monday, in fresh clashes one day after more than two dozen people died in riots that grew out of a Christian protest against a church attack. Sunday's sectarian violence was the worst in Egypt since the uprising that ousted Hosni Mubarak in February.

Security officials said Monday that the death toll from Sunday night's clashes rose to 26 from 24, after two people died of their wounds.

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8:14am

Mon October 10, 2011
Performing Arts and Culture

Remembering the Cardiff Giant

The hoax put the Onondaga County Hamlet of Cardiff in newspaper headlines across the world. But it's been more than a century since the Cardiff Giant was unearthed and there is an effort underway to make sure that "the hoax that fooled America" is never forgotten.

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