4:56pm

Wed October 12, 2011
The Salt

Facing Planetary Enemy No. 1: Agriculture

Originally published on Thu October 13, 2011 8:43 am

Early morning view of an automated irrigation system in on a farm in Sudlersville, MD

Cliff Owen AP

For the past 200 years, ever since Thomas Malthus published his Essay on the Principle of Population, big thinkers have been wondering whether Earth-dwellers will eventually run out of food.

Today, a global group of scientists released a fresh look at the question. They add a different, environmental twist to it. Can we feed the world without destroying the environment?

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Guy Raz is the host of TED Radio Hour, a co-production of NPR and TED that tackles astonishing inventions, fresh approaches to old problems and new ways to think and create. Each radio show is based on talks given by riveting speakers on the renowned TED stage, bound together by a common theme such as the thrill of space exploration, going to extremes, the source of happiness or 'when rights goes wrong' in our justice system. Currently, he is also a Ferris professor of journalism at Princeton University where he teaches radio reporting.

4:44pm

Wed October 12, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Why Gingrich Opposes Recommendation Against Routine PSA Tests

At last night's GOP presidential debate in New Hampshire, Newt Gingrich condemned the government's latest effort to discourage men from routinely getting blood tests for prostate cancer by citing the views of Dr. Andrew von Eschenbach.

Gingrich stressed some of von Eschenbach's prestigious bona fides, including heading the National Cancer Institute and practicing at one of the country's major cancer centers.

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4:41pm

Wed October 12, 2011
The Two-Way

Amid Fresh Controversy, Dow Jones European Executive Steps Down

The hits keep coming for Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation: While the company is still dealing with the consequences of its phone hacking scandal in the U.K., yesterday the publisher of The Wall Street Journal's European edition stepped down.

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3:19pm

Wed October 12, 2011
The Two-Way

To Ease Budget Crunch, Topeka, Kan. Repeals Domestic Violence Law

A budget battle between the city of Topeka, Kan. and Shawnee County has led to the repeal of the city's domestic violence law and freed about 30 people charged with abuse.

Here's how the Kansas City Star tells the story:

It started when Shawnee County District Attorney Chad Taylor announced that a 10 percent budget cut would force him to end his office's prosecution of misdemeanor cases, almost half of which last year were domestic battery cases.

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3:00pm

Wed October 12, 2011
Law

Cook County Investigates Gacy Cold Cases

The Cook County sheriff's office in Illinois has launched a new effort to identify eight unidentified victims of mass murderer John Wayne Gacy. The department wants relatives of men who disappeared between 1970 and 1978 to participate in saliva tests to compare their DNA with that of the victims' bones.

3:00pm

Wed October 12, 2011
Remembrances

Gay Rights Movement Pioneer Dies

Frank Kameny, a pioneer in the gay rights movement, died Tuesday at 86. In 1957, Kameny was fired from his job as an astronomer for the U.S. government because he was homosexual. He fought his dismissal in court for years and in the 1960s, began picketing outside the White House, calling for equal rights for gays and lesbians. In 2009, the government issued him a formal apology for his firing.

3:00pm

Wed October 12, 2011
Law

Topeka, Kan., Repeals Domestic Violence Law

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 6:27 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, host: This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

GUY RAZ, host: And I'm Guy Raz.

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3:00pm

Wed October 12, 2011
NPR Story

A Look At Manssor Arbabsiar

A look at Manssor Arbabsiar, the man at the center of the alleged murder-for-hire plot against the Saudi ambassador to the U.S.

3:00pm

Wed October 12, 2011
The Record

Death Metal, Vernacular And Tradition: The Music Scene In Taiwan

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 6:27 pm

A Moving Sound. YunYa Hsieh stands at the center, Scott Praire sits to the right.

Courtesy of the artists

Taiwan might be known to most Americans for its export economy, but it's also been importing musical styles — from avant garde jazz to hip-hop. I first learned about Taiwan's thriving music scene from Joshua Samuel Brown. He's a travel writer who authored the last two editions of Lonely Planet: Taiwan.

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