4:00am

Wed October 5, 2011
Education

Thieves Scam Aid From Online Education Sites

The Department of Education says that as distance learning has grown so has fraud. An inspector general's report found that scam artists are taking advantage of the popularity of online education to steal federal education money.

4:00am

Wed October 5, 2011
NPR Story

NBA Labor Talks Break Down

Originally published on Wed October 5, 2011 5:28 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

National Basketball Association players and owners are not any closer to settling their labor dispute. With the season scheduled to begin on November 1st, there's a real chance regular season games could be lost. After yesterday's talks ended without much success, league commissioner David Stern officially cancelled the remainder of the preseason. Joining us for more on this dispute is NPR's Mike Pesca.

Good morning.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hello.

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4:00am

Wed October 5, 2011
NPR Story

U.N. Resolution Against Syria Fail In Security Council

The U.N. Security Council has failed to agree on what to do about Syria's brutal crackdown on anti-government protesters. Tuesday night, Russia and China vetoed a resolution condemning Syria, even after the text was watered down and stripped of any threats of sanctions.

4:00am

Wed October 5, 2011
NPR Story

USDA Wants To Limit Potatoes In School Lunches

The Agriculture Department plans to limit potato consumption among schoolchildren to two servings a week. But politicians and farmers in potato-growing states such as Maine say the spud is being unfairly targeted. As it turns out, schoolchildren have strong opinions about potatoes too. Josie Huang of Maine Public Radio reports.

Kirk Siegler reports for NPR, based out of NPR West in California.

Siegler grew up near Missoula, MT, and received a B.A. in journalism from the University of Colorado.  He’s an avid skier and traveler in his spare time.

12:01am

Wed October 5, 2011
Law

Do Civil Rights Laws Apply To Parochial Schools?

Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

The United States Supreme Court hears arguments Wednesday in a major case testing the rights of teachers in religious schools. At rock bottom, the issue is who is a minister and when, if ever, that individual is exempt from the nation's civil rights laws.

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12:01am

Wed October 5, 2011
Living Large: Obesity In America

The Thinnest State Loosens Its Belt

Originally published on Wed October 5, 2011 5:28 pm

Ryan Van Duzer, an outdoor enthusiast who has starred in reality TV adventure shows, visits Colorado schools to talk about how working out can be entertainment. He says he often leaves frustrated after kids tell him about staying inside playing video games.
Kirk Siegler for NPR

Part of an ongoing series on obesity in America.

The obesity crisis is catching up with Colorado, the nation's thinnest state.

Being fit is part of the culture in Colorado: there are biking trails and hiking trails and ski slopes and even the high altitude itself helps burn off calories. But waistlines are widening, especially among children.

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12:01am

Wed October 5, 2011
Business

Is Nostalgia Enough To Save Friendly's?

Ever since two brothers opened the first Friendly's ice cream shop in Massachusetts 75 years ago, the company has been serving up as much "family and feel good" as it has french fries and frappes.

"My grandma would take me and my brother out and we would always get the watermelon slice," says 23-year-old Lisa Lane. "Ah! The watermelon slice!"

Fans like Lane helped Friendly's expand to more than 600 locations by the 1980s.

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12:01am

Wed October 5, 2011
Middle East

Even In Lebanon, No Safe Haven For Syrian Dissidents

Lebanese and Syrian protesters demonstrate against the Syrian government in Beirut in August. Syrian defectors say they fear the Syrian regime will track them down, even in Lebanon.

Anwar Amro AFP/Getty Images

Syrian exiles, both defecting soldiers and civilian protesters, have slipped across the border into northern Lebanon seeking safety from the Syrian government and its relentless crackdown on opponents.

But even here, they can literally hear the shooting from across the border in the restive Syrian town of Homs, less than 20 miles away. They express fear that President Bashar Assad's forces will track them down in Lebanon. Those most at risk are army defectors who are hiding out in small Lebanese villages.

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12:01am

Wed October 5, 2011
Planet Money

Occupy Wall Street: Where Everybody Has A Say In Everything

Spencer Platt Getty Images

At Zuccotti Park in lower Manhattan, where hundreds of Occupy Wall Street protesters are camped out, there's a big meeting every night at 7:00.

The protesters call it the General Assembly, and it's a meeting where every single person has a say in every single decision that gets made. For the protesters, this is a model society.

It's a model where it takes a really long time to make a decision — like, say, whether to buy more sleeping bags for the group.

I visited the park for a General Assembly earlier this week. Here's what I heard.

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