8:00am

Sat September 10, 2011
NPR Story

Libyans Launch Attack On Towns Loyal To Gadhafi

Libya's victorious rebels say they will soon launch operations against the last three Libyan towns still held by forces loyal to ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi. Host Scott Simon talks to NPR's Corey Flintoff from Bani Walid, in the desert south of Tripoli.

8:00am

Sat September 10, 2011
NPR Story

Protesters Attack Israeli Embassy In Cairo

Angry Egyptian protesters attacked the Israeli Embassy in Cairo overnight, breaching the building and sending the Israeli ambassador, his family and most embassy staff fleeing. Host Scott Simon gets the latest from NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson in Cairo.

8:00am

Sat September 10, 2011
NPR Story

Sept. 11 A 'Fundamental Turning Point' For Blair

In observance of the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, host Scott Simon talks with former British Prime Minister Tony Blair about the U.K.'s role in fighting terrorism and Britain's relationship with the U.S.

8:00am

Sat September 10, 2011
NPR Story

Arthur Ashe: A Civil Right Activist Off The Court

NPR's summer road trip series, "Honey Stop the Car!" pulls over in Richmond, Va., where a statue of tennis great Arthur Ashe stands in an unlikely place. It's among statues of major figures from the Confederacy. Allison Keyes

6:24am

Sat September 10, 2011
Movie Interviews

Following 'Soldiers,' To The Battlefield And Back

Originally published on Sat September 10, 2011 11:45 am

"There are so many questions and so little answers while you're [in Afghanistan]," says Dominic "Dom" Fredianelli.
Heather Courtney Quincy Hill Films

Filmmaker Heather Courtney didn't set out to make a war story. "I set out to make a story about rural America," she says. Her new documentary, Where Soldiers Come From, is both war story and small-town homecoming saga; it follows a group of young men who sign up for the National Guard, serve in Afghanistan, and then return home to their families in Michigan's woody Upper Peninsula.

Courtney joins NPR's Scott Simon to discuss the documentary, along with two of the young soldiers featured in the film, Dominic "Dom" Fredianelli and Matt "Bodi" Beaudoin.

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6:16am

Sat September 10, 2011
Afghanistan

Pakistan Could Be Vital To 'Afghan-Led' Peace Process

Originally published on Fri September 23, 2011 1:05 pm

Pfc. Natan Martinez fires a machine gun from a position near the Pakistan border in Afghanistan. There is concern in Pakistan about the U.S. preserving a security presence in Afghanistan beyond 2014, the deadline to pull out most if not all U.S. combat troops.
David Gilkey NPR

An end to the war in Afghanistan is slowly beginning to come into view, 10 years after the Sept. 11 attacks. Few countries have been as deeply affected by the decade of fighting as Pakistan.

Since 2001, Islamist extremism fueled by the Afghan conflict has claimed the lives of 35,000 Pakistanis — 30,000 of them civilians.

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6:06am

Sat September 10, 2011
Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001

Tennessee Town Grapples With Sept. 11 Legacy

Hundreds of men pray at the Islamic Center of Murfreesboro, Tenn. The congregation wants to build a new, bigger place to worship, but has faced stiff opposition from citizens who fear the local Muslims have a political agenda. Imam Ossama Bahloul says it's nonsense to think the congregation is a threat.
Debbie Elliott

In Murfreesboro, Tenn., more than 5,000 people are expected Sunday for the annual Sept. 11 memorial. What started as a small flag ceremony at the Rutherford County's Sheriff's Department 10 years ago is now a major community event. Murfreesboro has been dealing with another legacy of the attacks, which is playing out in a controversy over a mosque.

A Local Response To The Trauma

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6:03am

Sat September 10, 2011
Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001

With TSA, Are We Safer Or Sorry?

At the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, a small temporary exhibit marks Sept. 11, 2001. Along with artifacts found in the wreckage of the World Trade Center and the Pentagon — like a smashed firetruck door and twisted bits of fuselage — is a bin filled with every imaginable object people have tried to carry on airplanes.

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5:34am

Sat September 10, 2011
Science

Thirsty Birds 'Burn the Engine' In Flight

A Swainson's thrush flies a mock-migration in the wind tunnel at the University of Western Ontario.
Science AAAS

Migratory songbirds like Swainson's thrushes spend their winters in South and Central America. But as spring approaches, they fly thousands of miles north to Canada.

Along the way, these little birds show endurance that would shame even the toughest athletes. They can fly for up to eight hours straight without stopping for food or water.

Scientists know how birds cope without food during the flights: They burn fat. But until now, they haven't figured out the water question. How do migrating birds avoid dehydration after all that flying?

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5:20am

Sat September 10, 2011
Politics

Obama Launches Aggressive Push For Jobs Plan

President Obama speaks about his new jobs proposal at the University of Richmond in Richmond, Va., on Friday.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

President Obama is selling his jobs plan as a much-needed shot in the arm for a still struggling economy. It includes new public works projects, help for local school districts, training opportunities for those who have been out of work a long time, and more than $200 billion in tax cuts for workers and the companies that hire them.

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