Beauty Shop: Student Debt, Star Divorce

Nov 1, 2011

This week, the Beauty Shop women discuss President Obama's plan to ease student debt, Kim Kardashian's divorce, and new marriage realities. Guest host Allison Keyes hears from NPR Digital News editor Tanya Ballard Brown, Jessica Coen with Jezebel.com, Latoya Peterson of Racialicious.com, and Danielle Belton with BlackSnob.com.

Holiday Job Hunters: Look Beyond Retail

Nov 1, 2011

Many of those seeking temporary work or extra cash may be turning to retailers this season, but they'll face stiff competition. NPR's Senior Business Editor Marilyn Geewax says job hunters may have better luck when submitting their applications to warehouses, Fed Ex, and similar companies. She speaks with guest host Allison Keyes.

With high tuition costs and dim job prospects, college students are increasingly struggling to make good on their loan debts. The White House recently announced changes that would make monthly payments less burdensome. Guest host Allison Keyes learns more from Mark Kantrowitz of FinAid.org and FastWeb.com.

GOP presidential hopeful Herman Cain is defending himself against reports that he allegedly sexually harassed two women in the 1990s. Also, Rick Perry's staff is trying to reboot his White House bid. And are President Obama's executive orders a way for him to bypass Congress? Guest host Allison Keyes talks politics with journalists Cynthia Tucker and Mary Kate Cary.

As states have closed down mental hospitals, they've struggled to find housing for the mentally ill. In Florida, assisted-living facilities have become the de facto solution.

It takes just a high school diploma and 26 hours of training to run one of Florida's mental health assisted-living facilities — that's lower than the state requirements for becoming a beautician, a barber or even an auctioneer.

Children taking stimulant drugs like Ritalin for ADHD aren't at greater risk of having a heart attack or other serious cardiovascular problems, according to new research published online today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

But critics of the widespread use of prescription amphetamines to treat the symptoms of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder — 2.7 million children are taking the drugs — say this latest study still doesn't give ADHD drugs a clean bill of health.

In 1985, David M. Kennedy visited Nickerson Gardens, a public housing complex in south-central Los Angeles. It was the beginning of the crack epidemic, and Nickerson Gardens was located in what was then one of the most dangerous neighborhoods in America.

"It was like watching time-lapse photography of the end of the world," he says. "There were drug crews on the corner, there were crack monsters and heroin addicts wandering around. ... It was fantastically, almost-impossibly-to-take-in awful."

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton's mother, 92-year-old Dorothy Howell Rodham, has died.

The Clinton Foundation just sent this statement to the news media:

Ed Ward is the rock-and-roll historian on NPR's Fresh Air with Terry Gross.

A co-author of Rock of Ages: The Rolling Stone History of Rock & Roll, Ward has also contributed to The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and countless music magazines. The first part of his two-volume history of rock and roll, covering the years 1920-1963, will be published by Flatiron Books in the fall of 2016.

Ward lives in Austin, Texas. He blogs at City on a Hill.

In the early days of high fidelity, which I remember from childhood, the idea was that it was "almost like being there" when you listened to a record, something the old recordings never really delivered. The five CDs and six-plus hours of The SMiLE Sessions are certainly almost like being there, in the studio with the studio musicians — and, occasionally, The Beach Boys themselves — and Brian Wilson, as he tried to realize something he heard in his head.

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