Health Information Technology: the future of medicine

Dec 7, 2014
Community Eye Health / Flickr

With so much information being stored on the web today, it may come as a surprise that medical records have only recently begun the conversion into a digital format known as HIT, or Health Information Technology.  Like any big change, using electronic medical records poses many potential benefits and risks.

This week on “Take Care,” David Whitlinger discusses the factors involved in the switch from paper-based medical records to electronic medical records.  Whitlinger is executive director of the New York eHealth Collaborative and former director of healthcare device standards and interoperability for the Intel Corporation’s digital health group.

Maintaining a healthy weight through the holidays

Dec 7, 2014
thepeachmartini / Flickr

It happens every year. The holiday season rolls around and suddenly you can’t eat enough. Some people argue that holiday food is the best food of the year, but what can we do to make sure we don’t end up ruining a year’s worth of diet and exercise?

This week on “Take Care,” registered dietician Ashley Koff suggests strategies to eat healthy and not gain too much weight during the holiday time. Koff is a contributing editor to Prevention magazine, the author of two books and on the faculty of the Continuum Center for Health and Healing at the Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City.

Richard Ravitch has had a life full of significant public service positions in New York City, and has assumed those positions at critical times.  He has a memoir out, titled So Much To Do.  In this conversation with host Grant Reeher, Ravitch looks back on some of those experiences, and argues that a sense of collective responsibility and shared sacrifice were the keys to overcoming the challenges, and considers how those qualities are faring in today's political climate.

Federal spending on scientific research has not kept up with inflation in recent years, and it's made it harder for researchers to fund their work. Some of them are turning to another source -- crowdfunding. But, this new funding source raises new questions for scientists.

Ellen Abbott/WRVO

The Eric Garner protests have spread to central New York. About two dozen demonstrators gathered in front of the federal building in Syracuse today to express concern about latest court case involving an unarmed black man killed by police.  

Anna Morris of Syracuse says she was angry and hurt when she heard there would be no charges filed against the police officer involved in the chokehold death of Eric Garner in New York City.

Didi Schanche is deputy senior supervising editor on NPR's award-winning International Desk. She also is NPR's Africa and Latin America editor.

A journalist since 1981, Schanche landed her first reporting job as freelance correspondent for The Jerusalem Post in Cairo, Egypt. She returned to the United States and got a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism in 1982. With the ultimate goal of becoming a foreign correspondent, Schanche spent several months banging on doors and was hired by The Associated Press as a reporter based in Montgomery, Ala. After two years, she was transferred to the foreign desk at AP headquarters in New York. Two years later, she was sent to Nairobi, Kenya, to cover East Africa.

Tuned to Yesterday

Dec 5, 2014

#1223, Science Fiction, Lights Out "The Immortal Gentleman" 8/31/43 CBS, Dimension X "Time and Time Again" 7/12/51 NBC.

Tuned To Yesterday features programs from radio's golden era. Drama, Comedy, Western, Sci-Fi and more. Produced by Mark Lavonier.

Army announces new Fort Drum commander

Dec 5, 2014
U.S. Army

Maj. Gen. Jeffrey Bannister has been named the new commander of Fort Drum and the 10th Mountain Division. Bannister worked as the deputy commander general for Fort Drum between 2009 and 2011 before taking a job with the Pentagon.

Anthony Keating, who works for the secretary of the Army, knows Bannister well. He says Bannister's familiarity with the North Country will help him make a smooth transition back to Fort Drum.

"I think he will fit in extremely well here because he knows so many people," Keating said.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO

A downstate Democrat is trying to reinvigorate a plan to create a publicly funded, single-payer health care system in New York state. Assemblyman Richard Gottfried is getting the ball rolling with a series of legislative hearings, including the first in Syracuse.

Gottfried, a Manhattan Democrat, says getting rid of insurance companies and putting the state in charge of health care would save consumers $20 billion a year by eliminating insurance company overhead and the administrative costs doctors and hospitals incur while dealing with insurance companies.  

David Guo / Flickr

A federal loophole is letting some dangerous trucking companies continue to operate in New York state. But U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer is looking to close it by calling for stricter tracking measures that would keep dangerous trucking companies off the road.

“Rather than pay the fine or face repercussions, some (trucking companies) dissolve and reapply for permitting under a different name," Schumer said. "They’re called chameleon carriers. Same owners, same employees, same vehicles, just a different name.”

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