Lulu Miller is an NPR Science Desk Reporter where she covers human (and occasionally insect) behavior — and is co-host of the upcoming NPR program Invisibilia.

Tuned to Yesterday

Jan 9, 2015

#1248, Western, Gunsmoke “Amy’s Good Deed” 11/27/55 CBS, Quiet, Please “A Red and White Guidon” 2/9/48 MBS

Tuned To Yesterday features programs from radio's golden era. Drama, Comedy, Western, Sci-Fi and more. Produced by Mark Lavonier.

Bitter cold: the basics of hypothermia

Jan 9, 2015
Corey Templeton / Flickr

In these cold winter months, the risk for hypothermia rises. You don't have to be an outdoor enthusiast or an avid hiker, in fact, don't even have to be outside to develop hypothermia. A few degrees means the difference between a normal core body temperature, and a temperature dangerously close to hypothermia.

This week on "Take Care," we speak with Dr. Chris McStay, chief of clinical operations in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, about hypothermia and how to avoid it.

Ellen Abbott / WRVO News

The Syracuse University School of Law is the site of the first comprehensive veterans legal clinic in New York state. The impact of having an attorney present is incredible, especially when veterans apply for benefits or an upgrade in their military discharge, according to one of the founders of the new Veterans Legal Clinic at SU’s law school.

Chris Ford / Flickr

The legislative session is off to a subdued start, with the governor’s State of the State message delayed for two weeks. Nevertheless, fault lines are already forming over some key issues, including rent regulations and how to measure teacher performance.

Some rights reserved by Samantha Celera

A bad flu virus continues to spread through the community, as flu cases in Onondaga County are up five-fold from this time last year.

The flu is coming early and often for much of the United States, according to health officials, and central New York has not been spared.

New York's mesonet: economic implications

Jan 9, 2015
Howard Owen

Scientists at the University at Albany are developing a state-wide weather detection system called the mesonet. The network of 125 weather stations will record weather variables like temperature, wind speed, and precipitation. A study by the American Meteorological Society shows New York’s economy suffers the most from inclement weather and environmental variability. Concluding this series, we speak with a farmer whose livelihood depends on the weather.

Mike Blyth / Flickr

In the early days of the AIDS epidemic, a positive diagnosis was virtually a death sentence.  Today, a person taking antiretroviral medications can live long term with the disease as a chronic infection. Now researchers are looking into why the aging population living with HIV/AIDS is at greater risk for heart disease and stroke.

Clinical researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center will use a $3.8 million grant to investigate why people treated with antiretrovirals for HIV have higher than average rates of heart disease and stroke.

Tuned to Yesterday

Jan 8, 2015

#1247, Series, Les Miserables “The Trial” Part 3 8/6/37 MBS, Shadow of Fu Manchu “#16” 6/12/39 Syndicated, Firefighters “Episode #3” 11/16/49 Syndicated

Tuned To Yesterday features programs from radio's golden era. Drama, Comedy, Western, Sci-Fi and more. Produced by Mark Lavonier.

People who walk regularly for exercise may notice that their speed declines and they tire more easily as they age. But is that because they are aging? Could that reduction in pace and energy be slowed or reversed by other types of exercise, like running?

Upstate Medical University exercise physiologist Carol Sames explains how running was found to be more beneficial than walking in a study that compared walkers and runners in Boulder, Colorado. She says running is not appropriate for everyone, and she offers some other ways walkers can add intensity to their workouts.

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