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In 2007, Franklin Gilliard and his wife, a teacher's aide named Sherry, started their own business: a driving school. Shortly after, they were hit by the recession.

The couple worked hard to stay afloat, but despite their efforts, they found themselves drowning in past-due bills and late notices and became homeless in 2013.

"We had the car repossessors there. We had the bank knocking on the door. You just feel like you're a prisoner in your own home," says Franklin, 46.

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Talking (Very Frankly) About Sex On Campus

2 hours ago

"Losing Your (Concept of) Virginity." "Negotiating Successful Threesomes." "Vagina 101." These aren't your parents' college classes.

Consider this a syllabus for Sex Week, a series of workshops, discussions and screenings dedicated to, well, you know what, that are becoming popular – and controversial – on campuses around the country.

Yale University held one in 2002 and since then there have been at least 20, including at the University of Chicago, the University of Maryland and Harvard University.

Ebola is elusive and stealthy, so a medical degree doesn't automatically prepare a health worker to figure out if a new patient is a likely Ebola case.

The symptoms mimic other diseases. Fever, chills and vomiting could also signal malaria or maybe just a heavy night of drinking. If clinicians guess wrong, they might accidentally put an uninfected person into a treatment area with patients who have contracted the virus.

Out of love and necessity, Stuart has become a country-music historian. "People were throwing things away," he says. "I just took it as a family matter."

Originally broadcast Oct. 1, 2014.

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Scientists — and anyone who lives with a canine — know that dogs pay close attention to the emotion in our voices. They listen for whether our tone is friendly or mean, how the pitch goes up or down and even the rhythms in our speech.

But what about the meaning of the words we say?

Sure, a few studies have reported on super smart dogs that know hundreds of words. And Chaser, a border collie in South Carolina, even learned 1,022 nouns and commands to go with them.

The U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, is far from being closed — something President Obama promised to do in the first days of his administration. But people are being released.

AFL-CIO Supports Black Friday Strikes Against Walmart

5 hours ago

The day after Thanksgiving is traditionally one of the busiest shopping days of the year. Bargain hunters heading to Walmart, in addition to looking for holiday deals, may find workers participating in Black Friday Strikes.

Since 2012, Our Walmart, which is an employee labor group, has been staging strikes on the day after Thanksgiving.

Employees at stores in six states and Washington, D.C., plan to participate and more locations are expected to join in.

Dripping in diamonds and shimmering in silks, the movie stars of the 1930s and '40s dazzled on the silver screen. Now, some of their costumes and jewels are on view at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. There, a film clip runs on a wall behind gorgeously gowned mannequins lit by sconces and chandeliers. The clip is from 1932's No Man of Her Own, starring Clark Gable and Carole Lombard. Nearby, co-curator Michelle Finamore points to the actual gown Lombard wore. It's long, made of slinky silk crepe and covered in teeny gold-colored glass beads.

Thailand's military junta has apparently blocked domestic access to a scathing new report from U.S.-based Human Rights Watch which describes the country as having fallen into an "apparently bottomless pit" since Army Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha seized power six months ago.

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Pope Francis is heading to Turkey for what could be one of the most challenging trips of his young papacy.

The three-day visit, which begins Friday, will be a mix of the religious and political, with the pope addressing topics ranging from Christian unity to the worsening plight of Christians in the Muslim-dominated Middle East.

While the Catholic and Orthodox churches have been divided since the "Great Schism" nearly a millennium ago, Francis will attend Sunday's celebration of St. Andrew, patron saint of the Greek Orthodox Church.

By one estimate, Americans will eat 46 million turkeys on Thanksgiving.

But this story is not about them. It's about a smaller group of turkeys — about 100 who roam the wild streets of New York City. These feral birds live in Staten Island, the least urban of the five boroughs. Local officials have been trying to relocate the birds for years, but their plan has had trouble getting off the ground.

The World Trade Organization has received the unanimous backing of its 160 member nations for a first-ever multilateral trade deal, an agreement that has been years in the making and that the organization claims could add $1 trillion annually to global commerce.

An oil rig now floats offshore in one of Europe's top winter beach destinations — Spain's Canary Islands. For the first time, Spain has authorized offshore oil drilling there. It's hoping to reduce its dependence on foreign oil. But the project has prompted massive protests by local residents and environmental groups like Greenpeace.

Two teenagers who were found hanging from a tree outside a village in northern India in May in an apparent rape-and-murder may have taken their own lives, Indian officials now say.

Theo Padnos, who has also written under the name Peter Theo Curtis, spent the last two Thanksgivings as a hostage of Islamist militants in Syria.

He was released in August and will spend this Thanksgiving with his family.

Here & Now’s Robin Young visited his mother, Nancy Curtis, at her home in Cambridge, Mass., to talk about Theo’s capture and the behind-the-scenes negotiations that led to his release.

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Updated at 5:05 p.m. ET

At least five people are dead in the Afghan capital, Kabul, after after a suicide bombing attack on a British embassy vehicle. A guesthouse run by a foreign aid agency in the diplomatic area of the city also came under attack.

The BBC says that "a British worker and an Afghan member of staff among those killed.

"The Briton who died was a member of the embassy security team, as was another UK national who was wounded.

Update at 5:50 p.m. ET

OPEC oil ministers have agreed to keep production levels steady, virtually ensuring continued low prices at the gas pump and lower costs for jet fuel that could translate into cheaper air-ticket prices.

Reuters reports: "Benchmark Brent futures settled at $72.58 a barrel, down $5.17, after hitting a four-year low of $71.25 earlier in the session. The contract was on track for its biggest monthly fall since 2008. U.S. crude was last down $4.64 at $69.05 a barrel."

Hoodslam — a popular spectacle that is staged monthly in Oakland, Calif. — is described by the San Francisco Chronicle as "part wrestling show, part carnival act and all comedy."

The Ferguson Public Library is just a block away from the center of demonstrations at the Ferguson Police Department. As we've reported, when violent protests this week led to the burning of more than a dozen businesses and the uncertainty caused schools to close, the library stayed open.

The weather is still wreaking havoc for Americans still traveling today in planes, trains and automobiles, but for the most part, the situation has improved dramatically as people crisscross the country making their way to Thanksgiving gatherings with family and friends.

AAA estimates that 46 million Americans will travel more than 50 miles to attend Thanksgiving festivities — the most in seven years.

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