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5:38pm

Thu October 30, 2014
The Two-Way

Maker Of 'Body Cams' Used By Police Reports Spike In Sales

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 7:31 pm

Washington, D.C., police officer Debra Domino wears a body camera at City Hall in September.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Taser International is reporting a big jump in demand by police departments for "body cameras." The company, one of the biggest providers of body cams to police departments, says 2014 sales of its "Axon Body" model are up 300 percent over last year, and sales of its more expensive "Axon Flex" camera have doubled.

And what's interesting is that this spike started well before the August shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri.

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5:38pm

Thu October 30, 2014
Goats and Soda

Awful Moments In Quarantine History: Remember Typhoid Mary?

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 10:08 am

When American nurse Kaci Hickox came home after treating Ebola patients in Liberia, she was quarantined in a tent at Newark Liberty International Airport for three days — even though she showed no signs of illness.

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4:42pm

Thu October 30, 2014
World

Militants Push Ahead With Vote, Despite Fighting In Eastern Ukraine

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 3:00 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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4:42pm

Thu October 30, 2014
Media

Allegations Emerge Against Fired CBC Host Jian Ghomeshi

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 6:27 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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4:42pm

Thu October 30, 2014
Sports

Giants Fans Rejoice After Third World Series Title In 5 Years

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 6:27 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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4:42pm

Thu October 30, 2014
Politics

The Campaign That Seems More Crime Drama Than Congressional Race

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 6:27 pm

Congressman Michael Grimm is facing a 20-count federal indictment but despite the charges, Grimm stands a decent chance of being reelected in New York.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

A congressional race that sounds like the plot of a crime movie is playing out in Staten Island, N.Y. Republican Congressman Michael Grimm went undercover as 'Mikey Suits' when he was an FBI agent. Now Grimm is the one facing a 20-count federal indictment. But despite the charges, Grimm stands a decent chance of being reelected next week.

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4:42pm

Thu October 30, 2014
Politics

Obamas Head To Connecticut As Tight Governor's Race Nears Close

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 6:27 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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4:42pm

Thu October 30, 2014
U.S.

Nurse Kaci Hickox Takes A Bike Ride, Defying Maine's Quarantine

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 6:27 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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4:42pm

Thu October 30, 2014
The Two-Way

Sweden Recognizes Palestine, Drawing Sharp Israeli Criticism

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 7:50 pm

Sweden today recognized Palestine, just weeks after incoming Prime Minister Stefan Lofven said his government would become the first major European nation to make the move.

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4:42pm

Thu October 30, 2014
Goats and Soda

So For Halloween You're Dressing Up As ... A Sexy Ebola Nurse?

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 9:53 am

Dallas-area resident James Faulk turned his yard into an Ebola treatment center for Halloween. But he has a serious side: His Twitter account raises funds for Doctors Without Borders, a group active in the fight against the virus.
Tom Pennington Getty Images

People living in the United States have little to no reason to fear contracting Ebola, a deadly viral illness causing an epidemic in West Africa. Yet on Friday night, some Americans will dress up in hazmat suits akin to what health workers wear when treating an Ebola patient.

And, of course, there's even a "sexy" version.

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4:34pm

Thu October 30, 2014
The Two-Way

Watchdog Says Feds Shouldn't Have Let Man Take Grenade Parts To Mexico

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 5:10 pm

A Justice Department watchdog says repeated failures by federal agents and prosecutors allowed a man to transport grenade parts to Mexican drug cartels.

The case, in which agents allowed the American to go through with potentially illegal behavior in order to catch bigger fish, is reminiscent of Operation Fast and Furious, the gun-walking scandal that plagued the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms for years.

NPR's Carrie Johnson tells our newscast unit that the Justice Department's Inspector General uncovered serious flaws. She filed this report:

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3:35pm

Thu October 30, 2014
Shots - Health News

Medicare Concedes, Agrees To Pay For Woman's Home Health Care

A disabled woman with serious health problems who successfully challenged Medicare for denying her home health care coverage has racked up another win against the government.

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3:26pm

Thu October 30, 2014
Parallels

The Place Where Rutherford B. Hayes Is A Really Big Deal

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 6:27 pm

Paraguayan government employee Daniel Alonso holds a portrait of Rutherford B. Hayes at the government building in Villa Hayes, the Paraguayan town named after the 19th U.S. president. Hayes is revered for a decision that gave the country 60 percent of its present territory.
Jorge Saenz AP

Rutherford B. Hayes, the 19th U.S. president, doesn't get much respect. He's remembered, if at all, for losing the popular vote in 1876 but winning the presidency through Electoral College maneuvering. That gave rise to his nickname, "Rutherfraud."

But there's one place where Hayes stands as a historical heavyweight: in the tiny South American nation of Paraguay.

In fact, an industrial city on the banks of the Paraguay River is named Villa Hayes — Spanish for "Hayesville" — in his honor.

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3:04pm

Thu October 30, 2014
Goats and Soda

Unlikely Marriage Of Diseases: TB And Diabetes Form A 'Co-Epidemic'

Domitilia, 57, is a diabetic patient in the Dominican Republic who contracted tuberculosis. She's now cured of TB after two years of treatment.
Javier Galeano The Union

The world is facing a double-barreled pandemic reminiscent of the dual epidemic of tuberculosis and HIV that emerged in the 1980s – only potentially much bigger.

It's a "co-epidemic" of TB and diabetes that's beginning to affect many countries around the globe — poor, middle-income and even rich nations.

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2:53pm

Thu October 30, 2014
Shots - Health News

What A Brush With SARS Taught A Doctor About Ebola

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 12:45 pm

A man wears a protective mask as he carries a bouquet of flowers at Women's College Hospital in Toronto in March 2003, when SARS fears about were widespread.
Kevin Frayer AP

Back in 2003 I was a junior doctor working at a Chicago teaching hospital.

As one of the newer docs, my daily appointment schedule had lots of openings. Pretty much any assignment nobody else wanted came my way.

One morning the nurse who managed our clinic told me that my first patient for the afternoon may have been exposed to a deadly virus while he was traveling in Asia.

My job would be to dress up in a medical hazmat suit, examine him and figure out whether he should be quarantined.

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2:15pm

Thu October 30, 2014
Television

Can Shows Like 'The McCarthys' Replace CBS' 'Thursday Night Football'?

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 4:47 pm

Tyler Ritter (center) stars in CBS's The McCarthys with, clockwise from top left, Jack McGee, Laurie Metcalf, Jimmy Dunn, Joey McIntyre and Kelen Coleman.
Monty Brinton CBS

Five weeks after the fall TV season started, the broadcast networks are still cranking out new shows.

And in the case of CBS's The McCarthys, you may wish they had stopped a bit sooner.

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2:03pm

Thu October 30, 2014
NPR Ed

So Who Was Socrates, Anyway? Let's Ask Some Kids

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 11:34 am

Who Was Socrates?
NPR

In part two of our look at the ancient Greek philosopher, we ask students at a California school about the Socratic teaching method and the questions it inspires.

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1:38pm

Thu October 30, 2014
The Two-Way

4 People Dead After Plane Crashes Into Building At Kansas Airport

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 4:31 pm

A small airplane crashed into a building in Wichita's Mid-Continent Airport and killed at least four people on Thursday.

KAKE-TV reports that five others were injured and four are still missing. The station reports:

"Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Tony Molinaro says a twin-engine Beechcraft King Air 200 reported losing engine power just after takeoff around 9:50 a.m. Thursday.

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1:17pm

Thu October 30, 2014
The Two-Way

Thomas Menino, Boston's Longest-Serving Mayor, Dies At 71

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 7:10 pm

Boston Mayor Tom Menino served for 20 years before stepping down this year. He died on Thursday.
Lisa Poole AP

Boston's longest-serving mayor, Thomas Michael Menino, who held the job for more than two decades until stepping aside earlier this year, has died. He was 71.

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12:49pm

Thu October 30, 2014
The Two-Way

New Crash Test Dummy To Gain Pounds To Reflect Fatalities Among Obese

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 3:07 pm

The new crash test dummy — not this one — will weigh 271 lbs and have a body mass index of 35. Automakers use the dummies to prove their vehicles are roadworthy.
Patrick Krost iStockphoto

More than one-third of Americans are obese, and one recent study showed that obese drivers are more likely to die in a car crash. So the world's largest maker of dummies is making one that is obese.

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12:15pm

Thu October 30, 2014
The Two-Way

GDP Posts Strong 3.5 Percent Growth Rate In 3rd Quarter

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 7:18 pm

The U.S. economy grew at the solid pace of 3.5 percent for the third quarter, helped along by gains in business investment, exports and a big jump in military spending, the Commerce Department says.

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12:04pm

Thu October 30, 2014
The Salt

Apps Aim To Guide You On 'Sustainable Food' (Whatever That Means)

Confused about all the different sustainability ratings out there? The simplest option may be to shop at your local farmer's market.
iStockphoto

If you're reading The Salt, it probably comes as no surprise to you that consumers increasingly want to make food choices based on not just their health, but their ethics. A growing number of groups are coming up with technological solutions to help them.

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11:24am

Thu October 30, 2014
Business

Apple's Tim Cook In Rare Company As Publicly Gay Chief Executive

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 2:25 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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11:16am

Thu October 30, 2014
The Two-Way

Palestinians Condemn Closure Of Disputed Religious Site In Jerusalem

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 10:45 am

The Dome of the Rock Mosque in the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound, known by the Jews as the Temple Mount, is seen in Jerusalem's Old City. Israel closed the site to all visitors on Thursday following an assassination attempt on a right-wing Jewish activist.
Sebastian Scheiner AP

Updated at 2:55 p.m.

Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas has condemned the closing of Jerusalem's Temple Mount for the first time since 2000, calling it a "declaration of war" on the Palestinians.

"Harming the places sacred to Muslims and Christians is a red line," Abbas' spokesman said. The spokesman added that Abbas would "not permit this line to be crossed." The comments were reported by Israel's Haaretz newspaper.

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10:56am

Thu October 30, 2014
Shots - Health News

Why It's OK To Worry About Ebola, And What's Truly Scary

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 10:19 am

A protester outside the White House demands a halt to all flights to the United States from West Africa.
Mladen Antonov AFP/Getty Images

Public health types are getting increasingly annoyed with people freaking out about Ebola in the United States, from governors to the general public. It's easy to see why; when I heard a swim coach was getting questions from parents worried that their children might get Ebola from the pool water, it was hard not to cue the eye roll.

On the other hand, I suspect I'm not the only person whose husband asked her to buy chlorine bleach and gloves the next time I went to the store.

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10:50am

Thu October 30, 2014
The Two-Way

Maine's Gov. Threatens Legal Action To Force Nurse Into Quarantine

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 3:25 pm

Nurse Kaci Hickox and her boyfriend, Ted Wilbur, are followed by a Maine state trooper as they ride bikes on a trail near her home in Fort Kent, Maine, on Thursday.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Updated at 1:40 p.m. ET

Hours after Kaci Hickox defiantly breached a voluntary quarantine for possible Ebola by going on a bike ride, Gov. Paul LePage threatened to use "the full extent" of his authority to compel the nurse to remain in isolation.

"I was ready and willing — and remain ready and willing — to reasonably address the needs of healthcare workers meeting guidelines to assure the public health is protected," LePage said in a statement.

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9:28am

Thu October 30, 2014
All Tech Considered

Moving Past The Password, But At What Cost?

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 2:05 pm

Apps working with Digits, a new Twitter service, would simply ask for your phone number instead of a password.
Twitter.com

People hate passwords almost as much as they hate being hacked. The problem with the traditional password is twofold: To be useful, they have to be complex and difficult to guess. And passwords become less secure the more often you use them.

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9:04am

Thu October 30, 2014
The Two-Way

Apple CEO Tim Cook Comes Out As Gay

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 4:15 pm

Apple CEO Tim Cook waves to a crowd before he is honored by the Alabama Academy of Honor at the Alabama state Capitol on Monday.
Brynn Anderson AP

Tim Cook, the head of the world's most iconic technology company, has come out today in an op-ed on Bloomberg Businessweek, saying he's never denied his sexual orientation but "I haven't publicly acknowledged it either, until now.

"Being gay has given me a deeper understanding of what it means to be in the minority and provided a window into the challenges that people in other minority groups deal with every day," Cook writes.

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8:36am

Thu October 30, 2014
Code Switch

Navajo Nation Presidential Candidate Suspends Campaign

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 3:47 pm

Chris Deschene greets supporters in Arizona in early October.
Felicia Fonseca AP

Days before Election Day, Chris Deschene's campaign to become Navajo Nation president has officially gone into limbo.

Deschene, 43, made it onto the Nations ballot after receiving 19 percent of the vote — second to Dr. Joe Shirley Jr., a former Navajo president. But Navajo law requires that all presidential candidates speak the Navajo language fluently, and Deschene quickly came under fire when he was accused of not passing that test.

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8:28am

Thu October 30, 2014
The Salt

VIDEO: You Don't Know Jack-O'-Lanterns

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 9:54 am

Adam Cole/NPR

Decorative gourd season has arrived, and we decided to celebrate by investigating the science and history of pumpkins.

Do you know what happens when you feed ostriches pumpkin seeds? Or when the first pumpkin beer was brewed? Or what to call a zucchini-pumpkin hybrid? Watch our new video to find out.

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