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3:18pm

Thu April 5, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Fox In Socks! Dartmouth Names Its Medical School After Dr. Seuss

Originally published on Thu April 5, 2012 5:04 pm

An imagined new facade for Dartmouth's school of medicine (with apologies to Dr. Seuss).
Adam Cole NPR

At the college of Dartmouth, in the year '24
There lived a young humorist named Theodor.
Though boozing was banned as a crime and a sin,
Theo hosted a party with plenty of gin.
But then in through the door without even a knock
Burst the grinch who stole gin-mas: Dean Craven Laycock.

The dean started shouting. His face turned bright red.
"Put down your tumbler and listen up, Ted!
I'm kicking you out of those clubs that you're in.
Your work won't be published at Dartmouth again!"

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3:16pm

Thu April 5, 2012
It's All Politics

Craigslist Founder Takes On Voter ID Laws By Infographic

Originally published on Thu April 5, 2012 3:19 pm

It's about a week after it became available on the Internet but no less interesting now than it was then is the infographic by Craig Newmark, founder of Craigslist, which skewers voter ID laws cropping up in various states. One of his points — the cure is far worse than the disease.

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3:01pm

Thu April 5, 2012
Animals

White-Nose Syndrome: A Scourge In The Bat Caves

A little brown bat with white-nose syndrome hangs in Greeley Mine, Vt., in March 2009. The disease is spreading across the country, currently affecting bat populations in 19 states.
Marvin Moriarty U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

A disease that has killed more than 5.5 million bats in the eastern United States and Canada is making its way west. White-nose syndrome has now been diagnosed in three Missouri bats — the first confirmed cases west of the Mississippi. And scientists say it won't stop there.

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2:54pm

Thu April 5, 2012
Environment

Feds Interview New Witnesses In Polar Bear Probe

Two polar bears spar on the shoreline of the Hudson Bay in November 2007.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Federal agents interviewed new witnesses this week in an ongoing investigation of government scientists that's been called "polar bear-gate," according to the scientists' lawyer.

The controversial probe, now entering its third year, is looking into allegations of scientific misconduct related to a 2006 report by wildlife researchers Charles Monnett and Jeffrey Gleason, who described seeing dead polar bears floating in Arctic waters.

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2:32pm

Thu April 5, 2012
The Two-Way

No One's Claimed Mega Millions Win, Maryland Lottery Official Says

We still don't know who bought the three winning tickets in Friday's $656 million Mega Millions lottery drawing — one in Illinois, one in Kansas and one in Maryland.

And we still don't know what's going on with Mirlande Wilson, the Maryland woman who has made headlines by claiming to have purchased a big winner, but who hasn't yet provided any proof.

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2:17pm

Thu April 5, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Across America, The Grip of Prescription Painkillers Tightens

Originally published on Sat April 7, 2012 8:58 am

Hydrocodone is a key ingredient in the prescription painkiller Vicodin.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Tens of millions of Americans turn to powerful painkillers to ease their sufferings. But an analysis on the sales of two prescription drugs over a decade is particularly worrisome.

Check out The Associated Press' interactive map at the end of this post. It uses data from the Drug Enforcement Agency to show how sales of oxycodone and hydrocodone ballooned from 2000-10.

You can click on individual states to see which areas had the biggest increases.

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1:58pm

Thu April 5, 2012
The Two-Way

'Three Cups' Author Mismanaged Charity, Will Repay $1 Million

Originally published on Thu April 5, 2012 1:59 pm

Greg Mortenson, author of Three Cups of Tea and Stone Into Schools, with schoolchildren in Azad Kashmir, Pakistan.
Central Asia Institute

The author of Three Cups of Tea has agreed to repay $1 million to a charity he founded, after the Montana Attorney General's office found that he had mismanaged the nonprofit by spending charity money on personal items.

The AP reports that Greg Mortenson misspent Central Asia Institute funds on "family vacations and millions on charter flights."

The AP adds Mortenson pretty much had unchallenged control of the non-profit:

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1:55pm

Thu April 5, 2012
The Two-Way

'Kill The Head, The Body Will Die,' NFL's Gregg Williams Heard Telling Players

Gregg Williams, then a coach with the New Orleans Saints, in August 2011.
Bill Haber AP

Former New Orleans Saints defensive coach Gregg Williams is heard telling his players to target specific opponents and he goes so far as to mention the types of injuries those opponents might be vulnerable to in an audio recording posted online by a documentary filmmaker.

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1:50pm

Thu April 5, 2012
Economy

Just How Strong Is The Job Market?

Originally published on Fri April 6, 2012 5:44 am

Job seekers attend a career fair in New York City. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke says the quick drop in unemployment might have been a reversal of overzealous cutbacks during the financial crisis.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

The monthly employment report Friday could help answer a key question about the economy: Will the recently strong job growth slow once employers finish replacing the people they fired during the depths of the recession?

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1:00pm

Thu April 5, 2012
Environment

The Link Between Extreme And Climate Change

2011 brought exceptionally mild winters in most of the U.S., deadly tornadoes in the Midwest and extended drought in the West and Southwest. Kevin Trenberth, distinguished senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, discusses the correlation between climate change and extreme weather.

1:00pm

Thu April 5, 2012
Medical Treatments

Bariatric Surgery: The Risks And Benefits

Originally published on Thu April 5, 2012 2:14 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Over the past several years, doctors who performed weight loss surgery noticed an unexpected benefit: Many patients no longer needed to take their medication for their diabetes.

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1:00pm

Thu April 5, 2012
Africa

A Military Coup Creates Political Crisis In Mali

Mali is in political crisis after a coup d'etat in March that toppled the president and drove him into hiding. An Islamic rebel group has taken control of the north of Mali. NPR foreign correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton discusses the rapidly changing situation from the capital city Bamako.

1:00pm

Thu April 5, 2012
Around the Nation

Cyclists: Do You Really Obey Traffic Laws?

Bike lanes accommodate cyclists and help with visibility, and some people view the lanes as a way to facilitate urban transportation. But sharing the road has its challenges. Drivers bristle at the thought of losing parking spaces, and drivers and pedestrians both worry about reckless riders.

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12:46pm

Thu April 5, 2012
U.S.

How Lawyer Got Nation Talking About Trayvon Martin

Benjamin Crump (right), the attorney for Trayvon Martin's family, is joined by the Revs. Al Sharpton and Jessie Jackson at a protest in Sanford, Fla., last week. Crump has enlisted the help of prominent civil rights activists to draw attention to the case.
Roberto Gonzalez Getty Images

The prosecutor investigating the shooting of Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla., has not yet decided if she will bring charges against the shooter, George Zimmerman.

It took several weeks for the Feb. 26 shooting to draw the nation's attention — after Benjamin Crump, the attorney for Trayvon Martin's family, launched a campaign to get the case before media and civil rights activists nationwide.

Two days after the shooting, the high-profile civil rights attorney started getting calls about the case. "My phone was buzzing," Crump says.

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12:18pm

Thu April 5, 2012
The Two-Way

Security Company Says About 600,000 Macs Infected With Trojan Virus

Originally published on Thu April 5, 2012 1:51 pm

A map released by Dr. Web shows where the anti-virus software company found infected Macs.
Dr. Web

A Russian computer security firm says it has discovered that about 600,000 Apple computers have been infected with a "Flashback Trojan" virus.

Now, before we move on, you should know that the company making the announcement is Dr. Web, which sells anti-virus software that will protect a computer against that kind of virus. It's also important to note that many of the parties weighing in are part of a security community that makes money off selling anti-virus software.

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12:04pm

Thu April 5, 2012
The Two-Way

Two Years After W. Va. Mine Disaster: Grief, Anger And Questions Linger

Tonight, in Whitesville, W.Va., mourners will silently walk with candles on sidewalks lined with luminary lights to remember the 29 coal miners who died two years ago today in the nation's worst mine disaster in 40 years.

That memorial will follow a 3 p.m. ET event in Beckley,W. Va., where an honor guard will ring a bell 29 times to mark the moment the Upper Big Branch coal mine erupted in a massive explosion.

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12:02pm

Thu April 5, 2012
Book Reviews

Lionel Shriver's Not-So-'New Republic'

istockphoto.com

Lionel Shriver's new novel, called The New Republic, is actually an old manuscript with a star-crossed history. As Shriver explains in a prefatory note, this satire on (among other things) terrorism was finished in 1998, but, back then, publishers weren't interested. That was five years before Shriver's break-through novel, We Need to Talk About Kevin. Then, Sept. 11 happened: sincerity was in; irony was out. Publishers wouldn't touch this story that offered an ironic take on violent extremism.

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12:00pm

Thu April 5, 2012
NPR Story

In Trayvon Martin Case, Who's Considered White?

Race is central to the debate surrounding Trayvon Martin, the black Florida teen shot by neighborhood watch volunteer, George Zimmerman. Many media outlets first identified Zimmerman as "white," but his father describes him as a Spanish-speaking minority. Host Michel Martin explores the question, "who is white?" with sociologist Jean Halley.

12:00pm

Thu April 5, 2012
NPR Story

Navajo Nation Sues Urban Outfitters Over Trademark

The Navajo Nation is accusing the retailer of trademark infringement. Members say Urban Outfitters sold goods that used the Navajo name and symbols without permission. Host Michel Martin talks with Navajo Times contributor Bill Donovan about the case, and why some Native Americans find certain uses of the Navajo name offensive.

12:00pm

Thu April 5, 2012
NPR Story

Artist, Social Justice Activist Dies At 96

Host Michel Martin remembers American artist Elizabeth Catlett, who died this week at the age of 96. Catlett is known for integrating social justice activism in sculptures and prints. That activism caught the eye of the U.S. government at the height of McCarthyism. For years, she was banned from entering the U.S. from her adopted home of Mexico.

12:00pm

Thu April 5, 2012
Education

NYC Chancellor On Turning Around City's Schools

Dennis Walcott oversees a school system with more than one million students. Graduation rates are below the national average, and studies suggest most of the city's high school graduates are not ready for college. But Chancellor Walcott tells host Michel Martin that, after one year on the job, New York City schools are on the mend.

12:00pm

Thu April 5, 2012
Religion

Lessons On Forgiveness From T.D. Jakes

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, we'll check out more listener tweets as part of our Muses and Metaphors series.

But first, our Wisdom Watch conversation. That's where we talk with those who've made a difference through their work. And you might have caught our next guest on "Dr. Phil" or BET, or perhaps you've picked up one of his bestselling books or seen one of his many DVDs or movies.

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12:00pm

Thu April 5, 2012
Arts & Life

Australian Filmmaker Offers A Somber Poetic Tweet

Originally published on Fri April 6, 2012 8:49 am

As part of Tell Me More's series for National Poetry Month, host Michel Martin shares a poetic tweet from Jim Lounsbury of Sydney, Australia. He is a writer and filmmaker who listens to NPR on his iPhone. Listeners are invited to tweet original poems of 140 characters and less to #TMMPoetry.

11:57am

Thu April 5, 2012
The Salt

Chocolate Bilbies, Not Bunnies, For An Australian Easter

The bilby is an endangered Australian marsupial that has been run out of its habitat by humans and rabbits.
Courtesy of Australia's Queensland State Government.

In the turf war between rabbits and bilbies that plays out in burrows dug into Australia's arid grasslands, rabbits, those aggressive and fertile European immigrants, have largely won out.

But the chocolate bilby has staked its claim on the springtime candy shelf — an honor that could help the threatened species make a real comeback.

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11:24am

Thu April 5, 2012
Economy

Debt Struggles As Old As America Itself

An 18th century political cartoon entitled "A New Way to Pay the National Debt."
Library of Congress

As of today, the national debt held by the public is more than $10 trillion. That's more than $30,000 for every man, woman and child living in the United States.

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11:11am

Thu April 5, 2012
Million Dollar Donors

For Romney, Family Ties To Marriott Heirs Pay Off

J.W. Marriott dines with his son Bill in a Hot Shoppe in March 1969. The elder Marriott was close to Mitt Romney's father, George.
Dennis Brack Landov

Mitt Romney has been far and away the best-funded of the Republicans running for president. In addition to his own campaign chest, he has the wealthiest superPAC backing him, Restore Our Future.

Among the donors to Restore Our Future, are hotel tycoons J.W. and Richard Marriott. Each gave $750,000 so far this campaign cycle.

Humble Roots

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10:12am

Thu April 5, 2012

9:32am

Thu April 5, 2012
It's All Politics

Thursday Political Grab Bag: Poll Shows Romney Surge In PA

Mitt Romney has taken the lead in voter support in Pennsylvania, according to a new poll from Public Policy Polling which shows the Republican frontrunner ahead of Rick Santorum, the former U.S. senator from the Keystone State, 42 percent to 37 percent. That lead was just on the 4.9 point margin of error, suggesting a tie. That's bad news for Santorum, however, as he dropped six percentage points while Romney gained 17 percent from a month ago.

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8:40am

Thu April 5, 2012
The Two-Way

Jobless Claims Stay Around Four-Year Low

The number of people filing first-time claims for unemployment insurance stayed around a four-year low last week, the Employment and Training Administration just reported.

It says there were 357,000 such applications, down 6,000 from the previous week's revised figure of 363,000.

Claims have been running at the lowest rate since March and April 2008 for several weeks now.

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8:31am

Thu April 5, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Cancer Diagnosis Raises Risk Of Death From Heart Attack, Suicide

Originally published on Thu April 5, 2012 10:51 am

The danger of death by heart attack or suicide is greatest in the first week after a cancer diagnosis.
Max Delson Martins Santos iStockphoto.com

Finding out that you have cancer greatly increases the risk of death by heart attack or suicide, according to a new study. That risk is especially big in the first week after getting the bad news.

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