NPR News

Pages

3:27am

Mon December 19, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

For Black Girls, Lack Of Exercise Heightens Obesity Risk

Alexandria Johnson got involved with the Anderson Monarchs soccer team when her mother was looking for an affordable way to keep her active.
Todd Vachon WHYY

The evidence of America's obesity epidemic is all around us. But the problem is particularly acute among African-American women.

About half of African-American women in the U.S. are obese, compared to 30 percent of white women. Black women not only carry more weight, but they start piling on extra pounds years before their white counterparts.

So when does it begin, this excess and unhealthful weight? Research suggests the problem starts early, and it may have a lot to do with when girls give up regular exercise.

Read more

3:26am

Mon December 19, 2011
Photography

Powerful Portraits Capture China's Empress Dowager

Originally published on Mon December 19, 2011 7:20 am

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery SC-GR-254

Intrigue! Riches! Sex! Some violence! Not the latest movie plot, but a story that lurks in the background of some 100-year-old photographs of The Empress Dowager — once the most powerful woman in Asia. The mostly black-and-white photos languished for decades in the archives of the Freer Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. Now, they are on display and give a glimpse of Old China at a time when today's China is the picture of modern power.

Read more

10:22pm

Sun December 18, 2011
Remembrances

North Korean Leader Kim Jong Il, 69, Has Died

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:11 am

North Korean leader Kim Jong Il during a visit to Siberia in August. He died Saturday at age 69, according to state-run North Korean television.
Dmitry Astakhov AFP/Getty Images

North Korea's leader Kim Jong Il has died of apparent heart failure. He was 69.

In a "special broadcast" Monday from the North Korean capital, state media said Kim died on a train due to a "great mental and physical strain" during a "high-intensity field inspection" Saturday. It said an autopsy done Sunday "fully confirmed" the diagnosis.

Kim Jong Il wanted his successor to be his son, Kim Jong Un, who is believed to be in his late 20s. But there was no immediate word on a new leader in North Korea.

Read more

6:01pm

Sun December 18, 2011
The Two-Way

Former Envoy To Iraq Says Situation Still 'Very Fragile'

Paul Bremer, former Head of the Coalition Provisional Authority, seen here in 2007, says he believes the U.S. pullout of Iraq is premature and that the country is still very fragile.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

The war in Iraq is officially over and the last troops have pulled out of the country after a nearly nine-year long conflict.

Many of the architects and officials that were a part of the war are now looking back and reflecting on whether it was worth it, and if perhaps the ending of the war came too soon.

Read more

6:01pm

Sun December 18, 2011
The Impact of War

Report: High Levels Of 'Burnout' In U.S. Drone Pilots

Around 1,100 Air Force pilots fly remotely piloted aircraft – or drones. These planes soar over Iraq or Afghanistan but the pilots sit at military bases back in the United States.

A new Pentagon study shows that almost 30 percent of drone pilots surveyed suffer from what the military calls "burnout." It's the first time the military has tried to measure the psychological impact of waging a "remote-controlled war."

Read more

4:30pm

Sun December 18, 2011

4:06pm

Sun December 18, 2011
Remembrances

Albright Remembers Havel As An Artist, Hero

Originally published on Sun December 18, 2011 6:32 pm

Former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, left, talks to Czech former President Vaclav Havel, right, at a conference in 2007. Albright remembers her friend as an artist, a jazz lover and as an inspiration to the Czech people.
Petr David Josek AP

Vaclav Havel, the Czech playwright who led a revolution to bring down the country's communist regime, died Sunday morning at his weekend house in the northern Czech Republic. He was 75.

Havel's close friend, former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, was born in Czechoslovakia. She says he fit right in the center of the modern history of Eastern Europe.

Read more

3:00pm

Sun December 18, 2011
Iraq

As War Ends, Iraqi Exile Looks Back

As troops withdraw from Iraq, it's a bittersweet day for Brandeis University Professor Kanan Makiya. On April 9, 2003, Makiya watched the fall of Baghdad on television from the Oval Office, alongside President George W. Bush. The former Iraqi exile was an outspoken critic of Saddam Hussein's crimes against the Iraqi people and had advised the President on the invasion of Iraq. Makiya tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz he believes the war was worth it for the Iraqi people — but perhaps not for the Americans.

1:52pm

Sun December 18, 2011
Politics

Run Against Gingrich? Cooter From 'Dukes' Did

With just a few weeks to go before the Iowa caucuses, Newt Gingrich is leading the pack for the Republican presidential nomination.

Given the possibility that President Obama could be facing Gingrich in the campaign next fall, it seemed like a good time to check in with someone who has experience running against the former speaker of the House.

Read more

10:58am

Sun December 18, 2011
Music Interviews

A TV Singing Star Champions The Pop Standard

After taking the top honor on America's Got Talent, Landau Eugene Murphy, Jr. has released his debut album, That's Life.
Courtesy of the artist

Landau Eugene Murphy, Jr. caught a lot of people off guard when he opened his mouth to sing at his televised audition for America's Got Talent. The dreadlocked former car-washer is 6'4" and in his late 30s, but when he belted the first notes of the pop standard "I've Got You Under My Skin" like a certain blue-eyed crooner, audiences and judges alike delightedly voiced their surprise.

Murphy's own social circle was harder to win over. He tells NPR's Guy Raz that at first, his family members laughed at the thought of him singing Sinatra.

Read more

9:10am

Sun December 18, 2011
Remembrances

Vaclav Havel, Leader Of The Velvet Revolution, Dies

Vaclav Havel, the Czech playwright who led a revolution to bring down the country's communist regime, has died. During the communist era, Havel was one of Eastern Europe's foremost dissident writers and champion of human rights.

Havel died Sunday morning at his weekend house in the northern Czech Republic, his assistant Sabina Dancecova said. He was 75.

Read more

8:00am

Sun December 18, 2011
Science

'The Onion' Of Medical Journals Pokes Fun At Studies

For the past 13 years, North America's medical community has had its own version of The Onion. The Canadian Medical Association Journal's "Holiday Reading" segment in its December issue brings satire and spoofing to its medical studies, with some unintended consequences. Host Audie Cornish talks with Barbara Sibbald, editor of the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

8:00am

Sun December 18, 2011
U.S.

Voting Rights: What's A Reasonable Requirement?

Originally published on Sun December 18, 2011 12:40 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This past week, the Obama administration took aim at a wave of new laws and policies they say will make it harder for some people to vote on Election Day. The state initiatives range from requiring voters to show government-issued I.D. to cutting back on early voting. Supporters of the laws, backed mostly by Republicans, say they are meant to reduce voter fraud. But critics, backed by Democrats, say the measures disproportionately, perhaps intentionally, affect minority voters, a group that supported Barack Obama in 2008.

Read more

8:00am

Sun December 18, 2011
Around the Nation

Marking Of Historic Flood Rises From Irene Wreckage

Originally published on Sun December 18, 2011 12:40 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

A Baptist church in Wilmington, Vermont is holding its first service today since Tropical Storm Irene flooded the town in late August. The New England village is still recovering from the flood, but Nancy Cohen from Vermont Public Radio reports cleanup crews made a discovery in the church that's bringing a message of hope.

Read more

8:00am

Sun December 18, 2011
The Impact of War

The Cost Of War, In Dollars And Lives

Originally published on Sun December 18, 2011 12:40 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Victory, defeat, stalemate - no matter how historians ultimately view America's involvement in Iraq, this much is clear: all wars are paid for with the coffers of a nation's treasury and with many, many lives. We're going to spend the next few minutes with experts on how much of both had been spent in Iraq. And we start with Todd Harrison. He's a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments. I asked him what should be an easy question: how much has America spent to date on the war in Iraq.

Read more

8:00am

Sun December 18, 2011
Economy

The Economic Reality Of Marriage

Originally published on Sun December 18, 2011 12:40 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish. In the intersection of love and marriage and divorce, there are romantic and economic considerations. This past week, NPR's Jennifer Ludden told us that fewer Americans are getting married; and when they do, they're taking longer to get down the aisle. NPR's Shankar Vedantam is working on the other half of the equation - when things go bad, divorce appears to be less of an option. Jennifer Ludden and Shankar Vedantam join me now. Welcome to the program.

Read more

8:00am

Sun December 18, 2011
Europe

From Greek Crisis, A Call For Transparency Emerges

2011 has been a year of social and economic upheaval in Greece. In exchange for bailout money to stave off default, the government is imposing harsh austerity measures. Reporter Joanna Kakissis says the task is especially daunting because Greeks have lost all trust in their civic institutions.

7:49am

Sun December 18, 2011
Europe

'Accessible To All': Spain Puts Hope In Holiday Lottery

Originally published on Sun December 18, 2011 2:04 pm

A man holds a Christmas 'El Gordo' lottery ticket he is hoping to sell in November in Madrid, Spain. It's a tradition for many people in Spain to buy tickets for the annual lottery, the largest of the year.
Denis Doyle Getty Images

Despite the cold and the rain, about 1,000 people stand in line outside a lottery kiosk in Spain. Pawn brokers walk up and down, offering cash for gold.

Among those in the long line is Bartolo Rivas. In this dismal economy, he says he doesn't have a job, but he does have the "help." The "help" is about $520 a month in unemployment, part of which he's spending on lottery tickets.

Read more

7:43am

Sun December 18, 2011
Leaving Iraq

Time To 'Heal' As U.S. Troops Leave Iraq

The "end of days," as soldiers were calling it, started at Contingency Operating Base Adder in southern Iraq. The base was the main staging ground for all U.S. troops exiting the country, and it was the last U.S. base to close.

There were a lot of lasts at COB Adder: the last signing ceremony, formally handing the last base over to the Iraqi government, the last briefing, the last patrol, the last hot meal.

The final convoy from the base left Iraq and crossed the border into Kuwait at dawn Sunday.

A 'Difficult Undertaking'

Read more

6:16am

Sun December 18, 2011
History

Finders Not Keepers: Yale Returns Artifacts To Peru

Originally published on Sun January 1, 2012 10:53 am

Musicians perform at the inaugural ceremony of the International Center for the Study of Machu Picchu and Inca Culture — a partnership between Yale University and The National University of San Antonio Abad in Cuzco.
Tim Moran

High in the Andes Mountains, Peruvians have been lining up to see a collection of antiquities that have finally returned home. The objects from the Inca site of Machu Picchu spent the past 100 years at Yale University in Connecticut, where they were at the center of a long-running international custody battle.

Now, the university is giving back thousands of ceramics, jewelry and human bones from the Peabody Museum in New Haven to the International Center for the Study of Machu Picchu and Inca Culture.

Read more

6:15am

Sun December 18, 2011
Mitt Romney

Romney Seeks Gingrich's Tea Party Lead In S.C.

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney speaks during a town hall meeting Saturday in Charleston, S.C. Romney is hoping to gain conservative support following the endorsement of South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley.
Richard Ellis Getty Images

It was warm and beautiful in the seaside resort of Myrtle Beach, S.C., Saturday, where Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney held his final town hall meeting of the weekend. As he stood surrounded by supporters wearing campaign T-shirts, Romney's mood seemed as sunny as the 65-degree weather outside.

Romney had a lot to be happy about. South Carolina's Tea Party-backed Gov. Nikki Haley had not only endorsed him, she regaled him with glowing tributes at every campaign stop in the multi-city tour.

Lining Up With The Tea Party

Read more

9:00pm

Sat December 17, 2011
Leaving Iraq

Huge Embassy Keeps U.S. Presence In Iraq

Originally published on Sun December 18, 2011 12:40 pm

Iraqi President Jalal Talabani speaks at the opening of the huge U.S. Embassy in Baghdad on Jan. 5, 2009. It is the largest U.S. Embassy in the world.
Handout Getty Images

As the final U.S. troops leave Iraq, they leave behind the largest U.S. Embassy in the world.

There will be about 16,000 people working for the State Department at the embassy in Baghdad and consulates elsewhere in Iraq.

At least 5,000 of those in Iraq will be private security contractors, and there are lots of questions about whether the State Department is ready to run such a big operation in such a volatile country.

Read more

9:00pm

Sat December 17, 2011
Leaving Iraq

Improvised Warfare In Iraq Leaves Lasting Effects

U.S. and Iraqi soldiers display "sticky IEDs" — magnetic bombs that militants attach to vehicles — found during a raid at a checkpoint near the Iraq-Iran border.
Peter Kenyon NPR

Army Sgt. Maj. Todd Burnett spent about three years in Iraq hunting for improvised explosive devices, also knows as IEDs.

"I can remember going out and one week I got blown up three times," Burnett says. He says back then, it wasn't whether you were going to get blown up, it was just a matter of when you were going to get blown up.

Read more

6:02pm

Sat December 17, 2011
Middle East

The Arab Spring: A Year Of Revolution

Tunisians protest outside the gates to the French embassy in Tunis. The country is where the Arab Spring began when a fruit vendor set himself on fire in protest in front of a government building.
Fethi Belaid AFP/Getty Images

A year ago, 26-year-old Mohamed Bouazizi was getting ready to sell fruits and vegetables in the rural town of Sidi Bouzid, Tunisia.

Bouazizi was the breadwinner for his widowed mother and six siblings, but he didn't have a permit to sell the goods. When the police asked Bouazizi to hand over his wooden cart, he refused and a policewoman allegedly slapped him.

Angered after being publicly humiliated, Bouazizi marched in front of a government building and set himself on fire.

Read more

3:44pm

Sat December 17, 2011
Around the Nation

U.S. Somalis Lose Only Means Of Sending Cash Home

Just north of downtown Minneapolis stand two cement, skyscraper apartment buildings covered in faded pastel patches. Most of the people who live there are part of the city's large Somali community. Once a month, many of them walk across the street to the small, blue shop that houses Kaah Express, a money-wiring business that links Somalis in Minneapolis to relatives in camps throughout East Africa.

Read more

3:30pm

Sat December 17, 2011
Music Interviews

Dessa: A Twin City Rapper Explores A Softer Side

Dessa is a member of the Minneapolis-based hip-hop collective Doomtree. Her newest album is Castor, the Twin.
Kelly Loverud Courtesy of the artist

Dessa is best known as a member of Doomtree, a hip-hop collective based in Minneapolis. But there's much more singing than rapping on her latest album, Castor, the Twin, which puts a jazzy, melodic spin on some of her previous work.

Dessa says the title refers to the brothers Castor and Pollux from Greek and Roman mythology. Castor, she explains, is the milder of the two.

Read more

3:00pm

Sat December 17, 2011
The Record

Cesária Évora, Grammy-Winning Cape Verdean Singer, Has Died

Originally published on Sat December 17, 2011 3:54 pm

Cesária Évora performing in Amsterdam in 2000.
Frans Schellekens Redferns

3:00pm

Sat December 17, 2011
Iraq

How To Withdraw From A Country

In the run-up to the U.S. military's withdrawal from Iraq over the last few weeks, up to 60 convoys have been roaring across the country at any given time, hauling supplies south to Kuwait. But that's just the equipment the military is taking. Major General Thomas Richardson, the Army's chief logistician in Iraq, tells weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz that sometimes it's cheaper to leave it there.

3:00pm

Sat December 17, 2011
Politics

Senate OKs Two More Months For Payroll Tax Cut

Each year, as Congress works to wrap up budget and tax bills and other "must-pass" legislation, inevitably not so must-pass items creep into the mix — inserted either to smooth passage for the more important things, or in the hopes that no one will notice. This year marks the first time that leadership has been unable to use earmarks to buy off reluctant votes, and has turned to other forms of grease instead. NPR's David Welna reports.

3:00pm

Sat December 17, 2011
Analysis

Week In News: Deal Keeps U.S. Afloat, For Now

Today, the Senate approved a $1 trillion bill to fund the government and a two-month payroll tax cut extension. Weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz speaks with James Fallows of The Atlantic about the last minute deal and other top stories from the past week.

Pages