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4:56am

Sat March 10, 2012
Economy

Job Trend More Than A Blip, But U.S. 'Can't Stop'

Originally published on Sat March 10, 2012 1:49 pm

President Obama speaks after touring Rolls-Royce Crosspointe engineering plant in Virginia on Friday. Obama declared America "will thrive again" after another encouraging report on jobs growth.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

The American job market is still a long way from healthy, but its pulse feels a lot stronger now than it did six months ago. The Labor Department says employers added 227,000 workers to their payrolls in February, a solid — if not spectacular — performance. It continues a trend that suggests a genuine recovery, not a temporary blip.

The unemployment rate held steady at 8.3 percent, even as nearly 500,000 people joined the workforce.

Improvement in the job market is a boon for President Obama as he tries to hold onto his own job in November.

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12:05am

Sat March 10, 2012
Fresh Air Weekend

Fresh Air Weekend: Maya Rudolph, William Shatner

Originally published on Sat March 10, 2012 11:44 am

In his solo show, Shatner shares stories about his childhood, his father, and his lengthy acting career.
Joan Marcus

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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12:01am

Sat March 10, 2012
Three-Minute Fiction

Three-Minute Fiction Round 8: She Closed The Book...

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 11:06 pm

Luis Alberto Urrea was a Pulitzer Prize finalist for nonfiction in 2005.
Nicole Waite Little, Brown & Co.

Ready for some creative competition? Weekends on All Things Considered is launching Round 8 of its Three-Minute Fiction contest. Here's what we look for: original, short fiction that can be read in less than three minutes — that's no more than 600 words.

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11:27pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Animals

Stubborn As A Mule's Knot: Chiropractor Eases Pain

Mules have carried people and supplies in Grand Canyon National Park for more than a century. Now they have a chiropractor to soothe their aching muscles.
John Moore Getty Images

The famous pack mules that carry supplies and people in and out of the Grand Canyon have back pain, as you might imagine. One man is on a mission to make the lives of these beasts of burden a little less painful.

When Rene Noriega retired a few years ago after a long career as a Border Patrol agent, he took what — for him — was the next natural step.

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6:47pm

Fri March 9, 2012
The Two-Way

VIDEO: Chilling New View Of The 1986 Challenger Explosion

Challenger explosion.
Huffington Post

Today, The Huffington Post released what it says is a never-before-seen video of the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster.

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5:50pm

Fri March 9, 2012
The Two-Way

Doomsday Prophet Camping Says Predictions Were 'Incorrect And Sinful'

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 5:51 pm

Harold Camping inside the Family Radio compound in Oakland, Calif.
Brandon Tauszik

Famously, Harold Camping, the founder of Family Radio, blanketed the country last year with warnings on bilboards and pamphlets that the world would end on May 21.

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5:32pm

Fri March 9, 2012
It's All Politics

Romney Mocks Pro-Obama 'Infomercial" And Its Celebrated Filmmaker

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 6:26 pm

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney speaks at the Mississippi Farmers Market in Jackson, Miss., on Friday. He had more than a couple of negative things to say about President Obama.
Rogelio Solis AP

Campaigning in Mississippi on Friday, Mitt Romney took a pre-emptive swipe at a new 17-minute video about President Obama to be distributed next week by Obama's re-election campaign.

"The Road We've Traveled" was created by filmmaker Davis Guggenheim, who won an Academy Award for the 2006 Al Gore climate-change documentary, An Inconvenient Truth.

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5:09pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Performing Arts

Mike Nichols: 'Salesman' By Day, Artist Always

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 6:13 pm

In the course of his career, director Mike Nichols has won Emmy Awards, Tony Awards, an Oscar and a Grammy.
Matt Sayles AP

Film and theater director Mike Nichols doesn't talk — he sells.

"The producers want us to sell, sell, sell," Nichols tells NPR's Robert Siegel. "That's my little joke. That's what we do by day; by night, we're artists."

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4:49pm

Fri March 9, 2012
National Security

Experts: A Strike On Iran Poses Many Challenges

Originally published on Sun March 11, 2012 9:12 am

Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, addresses a meeting in Tehran on Thursday. Khamenei is a staunch defender of Iran's nuclear program.
AFP/Getty Images

The question hanging over Washington for months has been this: Will Israel strike the Iranian nuclear program?

The Obama administration seems to have bought some time this week after rounds of meetings and speeches with Israeli officials in Washington.

Still, the president assured Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu that the U.S. will do all in its power to prevent Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon.

So the military option is still on the table.

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4:48pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

LSD Gets Another Look As Alcoholism Treatment

Originally published on Mon March 12, 2012 4:30 pm

LSD might provide a life-changing experience for people struggling with alcohol, a provocative analysis suggests.
iStockphoto.com

You might be tempted to chuckle about some Norwegian researchers peering back at experiments done during the '60s and '70s with LSD as a treatment for alcoholism.

But don't.

Their rigorous analysis, combining data from six different studies, concludes that one dose of the hallucinogenic drug might just help.

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4:45pm

Fri March 9, 2012
The Salt

Is It Safe To Eat 'Pink Slime'?

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 9:48 am

"Lean, finely textured meat" made from beef trimmings is often added to ground beef as a cheap filler
Daniel Acker Landov

"Pink slime" has been oozing back into headlines in recent weeks after McDonalds, followed by other fast food chains, announced it had stopped using beef trimmings to fill out its hamburgers.

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4:44pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Music Interviews

Anthony Hopkins Lives Out A Long-Deferred Musical Dream

Composer is an album of original classical music by Oscar-winning actor Anthony Hopkins.
Courtesy of the artist

Anthony Hopkins has been knighted by Queen Elizabeth II, and has played Richard I, Richard Nixon, monarchs, statesmen, geniuses and heroes. He won an Academy Award playing one of the most notorious movie villains in history: Hannibal Lecter, the criminal cannibal with an affinity for Bach. Now, Hopkins is making his own music.

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4:38pm

Fri March 9, 2012
The Two-Way

Mining Company Pleads Guilty In 2007 Utah Mine Disaster Case

Coal mining company Genwal Resources has pleaded guilty to corporate criminal charges stemming from the 2007 Crandall Canyon mine collapse in Utah that left nine miners and rescuers dead.

Federal prosecutors say a plea agreement includes a provision that no criminal charges will be filed against any individuals in the case.

Federal and congressional investigators blamed the an initial mine collapse on "retreat mining," in which pillars of coal holding up the roof of the mine are dug out, causing collapse of the mine behind them.

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4:33pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Music Interviews

Carolina Chocolate Drops: Hooked On Old-Time Sounds

Originally published on Sat March 10, 2012 1:49 pm

Carolina Chocolate Drops' new album is Leaving Eden.
Crackerfarm

Carolina Chocolate Drops breathed new life into old-time music with the 2010 album Genuine Negro Jig, which put a contemporary spin on Southern string tools from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. That collection went on to win a Grammy for Best Traditional Folk Album.

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4:32pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Rebuilding Japan

Crippled Japanese Reactors Face Decades Of Work

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:58 am

Last year's earthquake and tsunami crippled the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station. Foreign journalists saw cleanup and recovery work in process on Feb. 28.
Yoshikazu Tsuno AFP/Getty Images

The earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan on March 11, 2011, lasted for many terrifying minutes. But the multiple nuclear meltdowns that followed created an emergency that lasted for weeks and a legacy that will last for decades.

Here's how the event unfolded. The tsunami knocked out power to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. As a result, the cooling systems failed and three reactors melted down. Steam laced with radioactive material poured into the air. Water contaminated with radiation also flowed into the sea.

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4:28pm

Fri March 9, 2012
The Two-Way

Mormon Church Limits Access to Controversial Baptism Records

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 6:12 pm

Sunrise hits the Mormon church's temple in Salt Lake City.
Douglas C. Pizac AP

Persistent pressure and criticism have prompted the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to erect a new "technological barrier" in the system used for controversial posthumous or proxy baptisms.

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4:12pm

Fri March 9, 2012
The Two-Way

Harry Wendelstedt, Longtime Baseball Umpire, Has Died

This 1998 file photo shows veteran National League umpire Harry Wendelstedt, left, with his son, Hunter Wendelstedt, also an umpire.
Mary Butkus AP

Harry Wendelstedt spent 33 years as a National League umpire, including five stints to the World Series.

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4:12pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Around the Nation

Haven Or Hell: Refugees In Idaho Struggle For Work

Originally published on Sat March 10, 2012 1:49 pm

Nowela Virginie and her daughters often visit social worker Marcia Munden at Catholic Charities of Idaho.
Molly Messick StateImpact

In the last few years, more than 4,000 refugees have found their way to a far-flung spot: Idaho. Most of the state's incoming refugees come to Boise. For years, the city's strong economy, good-quality affordable housing and supportive community created an especially favorable environment for refugee resettlement. The recession has shifted that picture.

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4:00pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Africa

How Teenagers Learned To Hate Joseph Kony

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 4:25 pm

Joseph Kony in southern Sudan in 2006. His exact whereabouts today are unknown.
STR AP

If you're a teenager, you probably hadn't heard of Joseph Kony last week. This week, you probably couldn't avoid him.

"If I log onto Facebook or Twitter any time during the day, it's my entire news feed, basically," says Patrick Franks, an 18-year-old senior at Loyola Blakefield High School, outside Baltimore.

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3:46pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Europe

A Health Care Tragedy Plays Out In A Greek Port

Near the port of Piraeus and about 10 miles west of Athens, Perama developed after the Greek civil war of the 1940s, growing prosperous in the 1980s thanks to the ship-repair industry.

But now, the once-bustling piers are deserted. A few rusting skeletons of unfinished boats stand outside empty, abandoned warehouses.

That's because business migrated to low-cost Turkey and China, and in a few short years, industry jobs dropped from 4,500 to 50.

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3:41pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Rebuilding Japan

For Kids In Japan, Adjusting To A Changed World

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 10:22 pm

Students at Tohoku Chosen, an elementary and junior high school for North Koreans in Sendai City, now take dance classes in the school's cafeteria because their main building was destroyed when the earthquake struck northeast Japan last March.
Doualy Xaykaothao NPR

Teacher Dave Rowlands is talking to his students in a kindergarten class at Imagine Japan, an English-language school in the Miyagi Prefecture of Sendai City. The school is just a short walk from pre-fabricated homes built for families who lost more than just property in the earthquake and tsunami last year.

"What came after the earthquake, was what?" Rowlands asks. "A tidal wave. In Japanese, what do we say? Or in English, actually, tsunami is now used around the world in many languages. Tsunami. We kind of leave the 't' off of there."

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3:19pm

Fri March 9, 2012
The Picture Show

In Battle For Rhino Horns, A Clash Of Cultures

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 10:58 am

A white rhino cow (left) grazes with a bull that has become her companion after a poaching attack in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa.
Brent Stirton National Geographic

Rhino poaching has been on the rise in the past few years. In South Africa and other regions where rhinos run, poachers have been killing or darting rhinos with tranquilizers for their horns.

Rather than adorning walls, many horns are ground up into medicines, sold mostly in Southeast Asia. A possible — yet controversial — way to stop poaching may be rhino ranches, where the horns are harvested for sale and the animals are allowed to grow new ones.

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3:18pm

Fri March 9, 2012
The Two-Way

Syrian Opposition Leader Rejects Annan's Call For Dialogue

Syrian National Council leader Burhan Ghalioun attends a news conference in Paris on March 1.
Thibault Camus AP

The leader of Syria's main opposition group has some harsh words for Kofi Annan, who was appointed by the U.N. to be its envoy to Syria.

In an interview with the Associated Press Burhan Ghalioun said Annan's comments so far have been "disappointing."

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3:12pm

Fri March 9, 2012
It's All Politics

Despite Mixed Polls, Gingrich Claims Lead In Southern States

Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich speaks at a rally with his wife, Callista, on Thursday in Jackson, Miss.
Marianne Todd Getty Images

Mitt Romney may consider the pair of primaries in Alabama and Mississippi on Tuesday an "away game," but Newt Gingrich is claiming a home court advantage.

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3:00pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Europe

Greek Bond Swap A Temporary Fix

Greece's creditors agreed to take cents on the euro in the biggest debt swap in history.

3:00pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Middle East

U.S., Afghan Officials Sign Prison Agreement

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 6:00 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. In Afghanistan today, a small breakthrough that may help avert a major crisis. U.S. and Afghan officials signed an agreement regarding the largest American-run prison in the country. This is the same prison where last month U.S. soldiers burned several copies of the Quran, setting off riots and reprisal attacks on Americans. NPR's Quil Lawrence reports from Kabul.

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2:37pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Afghanistan

U.S., Afghan Forces Try To Rebuild Trust

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 6:00 pm

A U.S. soldier instructs Afghan soldiers in the western city of Herat last July. Afghans in security force uniforms have killed a number of U.S. and NATO troops recently. The shootings come as NATO works to prepare the Afghan forces to take control of security.
Jalil Rezayee EPA /Landov

In Afghanistan, the killings are called "green on blue" — that's when an Afghan soldier or police officer turns his gun on a NATO ally.

There was a wave of such violence just last month after U.S. soldiers accidentally burned Korans. Over the next week, six Americans were killed, apparently at the hands of Afghans working with the U.S.

The top U.S. and NATO commanders in Afghanistan think they have some answers to this recurring problem, and it's up to U.S. soldiers like Capt. Joe Fritze to see if they work.

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2:25pm

Fri March 9, 2012
The Two-Way

With 'Mouth To Snout' CPR, 'Mushing Mortician' Saves Iditarod Dog

Marshall, after his brush with death.
SB Nation

This story broke Wednesday in the Anchorage Daily News, but it has too much going for it not to pass along.

Monday night while competing in Alaska's Iditarod dog sled race, Scott Janssen's 9-year-old husky Marshall collapsed.

"Janssen raced to the dog," the newspaper writes. "Marshall did not appear to be breathing."

"I know what death looks like, and he was gone. Nobody home," Janssen told the Daily News.

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2:22pm

Fri March 9, 2012
The Two-Way

How Divided Is Congress? Two Charts Explain It

A chart from the National Journal.
National Journal

This is from a few days ago, but we missed it until The Atlantic pointed it out today.

We know Congress is divided. But how much so?

Here's a graph The Atlantic dug up from data The National Journal has put together using data they've collected for about 30 years analyzing congressional votes:

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1:11pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Planet Money

This 14-Year-Old Girl Just Bought A House In Florida

Originally published on Mon March 12, 2012 10:46 am

Willow Tufano, landlord.
Chana Joffe-Walt NPR

Meet Willow Tufano, age 14: Lady Gaga fan, animal lover, landlord.

In 2005, when Willow was 7, the housing market was booming. Home prices in some Florida neighborhoods nearly doubled from one month to the next. Her family moved into a big house; her mom became a real estate agent.

But as Willow moved from childhood to adolescence, the market turned, and the neighborhood emptied out. "Everyone is getting foreclosed on here," she says.

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