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10:20am

Sat November 12, 2011
NPR Story

MLB's Wilson Ramos Rescued In Venezuela

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host: This WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer. In Venezuela, officials have announced a dramatic end to the high-profile kidnapping of Major League Baseball catcher Wilson Ramos. Police commandos swooped in on a remote mountainous hideaway and rescued him. This was the sound at the Ramos home in Valencia, Valenzuela, when he returned there late last night.

(SOUNDBITE OF SIREN AND CHEERING)

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8:46am

Sat November 12, 2011
Around the Nation

Pigeon Racers Share A Passion Despite The Crap

Racing pigeons are bred to be stronger, smarter and have better endurance than normal pigeons.
Patrick Skahill

Each weekend, Bill Desmarais ships his birds off on a truck and somehow, they find their way home. In his backyard in Massachusetts recently, he welcomed home birds from a race that started 250 miles away in Verona, N.Y.

Pigeons have fascinated people for centuries. Charles Darwin, Pablo Picasso and Walt Disney all kept the birds. Today, thousands — including Mike Tyson — are flocking to the sport of pigeon racing.

Racing pigeons aren't like the pigeons you see in a park. They're stronger, bred for endurance and brains. Some are worth thousands of dollars.

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8:12am

Sat November 12, 2011
Commentary

American Bluegrass, Imported By A Czech Band

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 8:41 am

The Czech band Druha Trava will perform in Wichita, Kan., Saturday night. The band is on its U.S. tour.
Don Gonyea NPR

NPR's Don Gonyea normally reports on politics, but he finds other stories along the way, like this one about a touring bluegrass band from the Czech Republic.

The first time I heard Druha Trava play was April 2009. I was covering President Obama's trip to the Europe. There was a big outdoor speech in Prague, and the band was playing Czech versions of Bob Dylan songs.

I did a short radio postcard story back then, figuring it was the kind of experience that every music fan knows: You stumble upon a great band somewhere and never see them again.

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8:00am

Sat November 12, 2011
Politics

Celebrity Lawyer Takes Spotlight In Cain Case

It seems like hardly a month goes by without seeing celebrity lawyer Gloria Allred on television. This week, Allred was in the news again, representing one of presidential candidate Herman Cain's sexual harassment accusers. Her bold use of media to call attention to her clients' causes has earned the respect of some, but the irritation of others. NPR's Karen Grigsby Bates has a profile.

8:00am

Sat November 12, 2011
Politics

Next String Of GOP Debates Feature Foreign Policy

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 8:41 am

Transcript

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8:00am

Sat November 12, 2011
Education

Teachers Unions Mobilize To Survive In Ohio

This week, Ohio voters soundly rejected Gov. John Kasich's plan to scale back collective bargaining rights for public employees. The vote was a big victory for labor; in particular, it showed how important the nation's teachers unions have become beyond the classroom. Teachers groups are mobilizing like never before — because they face threats to their very existence.

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8:00am

Sat November 12, 2011
Middle East

Arab League Suspends Syria; Other Options Unclear

In an emergency meeting on Saturday, the Arab League voted to suspend Syria, warning that the country could face sanctions if it does not end its brutal crackdown on protestors. Meanwhile, NATO leaders say a Libya-style military intervention is out of the question. NPR's Kelly McEvers reports on what other choices remain.

8:00am

Sat November 12, 2011
Europe

Debt Weighs On European Politics

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 8:41 am

Transcript

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8:00am

Sat November 12, 2011
Business

Wanted: Temporary Holiday Workers

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 8:41 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Across the country, retailers are accepting applications for temporary positions this holiday season. Seasonal hiring might offer a bit of a break for people looking for work. Scott Detrow of member station WITF in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania has more.

SCOTT DETROW, BYLINE: 18-year-old Tyler Albinus is walking from store to store in a Lancaster, Pennsylvania outlet mall, looking for a job. He's been searching for more than a month now and has lost track of how many applications he's filled out.

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8:00am

Sat November 12, 2011
Europe

Spain Poised For Change As Elections Near

Change is in the wind across southern Europe. The governments of Greece and Italy are collapsing under a mountain of debt and Spain, too, is on shaky financial ground. Spaniards go to the polls on Nov. 20 and are expected to turn the ruling Socialist Party out of power. Yet, as Lauren Frayer reports, people there are also uneasy about the alternatives.

8:00am

Sat November 12, 2011
Art & Design

Wal-Mart Heiress' Show Puts A High Price On Art

Alice Walton's long-awaited Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art opens Saturday in Arkansas, and the art market is already feeling the impact of the Wal-Mart heiress and the money she's throwing at acquisitions. Not everyone is happy about it. NPR's Joel Rose reports.

8:00am

Sat November 12, 2011
Sports

Penn State Faces First Game Without 'JoePa'

After a week of child sex abuse charges that resulted in the firing of legendary football coach Joe Paterno, Penn State University plays its final home game of the season on Saturday. Students are holding a vigil and fundraising events ahead of the game against Nebraska. NPR's Jeff Brady has the latest in the wake of the scandal.

8:00am

Sat November 12, 2011
Research News

Polka-Dotted Horses? Cave Art May Not Be Fantasy

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 8:41 am

Transcript

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8:00am

Sat November 12, 2011
Sports

Crime And Scandal Tops Sports Headlines

On Saturday's docket in sports: the Penn State scandal, college basketball and the kidnapping and rescue of Washington Nationals catcher Wilson Ramos. Guest host Linda Wertheimer talks sports with NPR's Tom Goldman.

7:57am

Sat November 12, 2011
Deceptive Cadence

Aaron Copland's Forgotten Score Premieres At Last

Manhattan, Copland's "Quiet City," at night.
Joseph Gareri iStock

American composer Aaron Copland began work on Quiet City in 1939 and completed it two years later. A lonely trumpet and an English horn, backed by hushed strings, offer an ode to New York.

The orchestral version of Quiet City is fairly well known, but there's more to this story. Another version has recently come to light.

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6:00am

Sat November 12, 2011
The Record

Non-Jamaican Reggae: Who's Making It And Who's Buying It

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 8:41 am

Hawaiian reggae band The Green. From left to right Zion Thompson, JP Kennedy, Caleb Keolanui and Ikaika Antone.
Tammy Moniz Courtesy of Press Junkie PR

Reggae music and the island of Jamaica are inseparable, right? Lately, a crop of artists from places like Hawaii, California and Italy are proving that hit reggae can come from anywhere. In the process, they're raising some complex questions about culture and ownership.

There's a new generation of reggae artists with two things in common: They're not from the birthplace of reggae music, and they are enormously successful.

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5:36am

Sat November 12, 2011
Author Interviews

'Mrs. Nixon' Reimagines An Enigmatic First Lady

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 8:41 am

Aside from being the wife of one of the most well-known politicians in recent American history, Pat Nixon is mostly a mystery. Throughout crisis and scandal, she somehow managed to remain a private public figure.

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5:05am

Sat November 12, 2011
Law

Unpaid Interns: Real World Work Or Just Free Labor?

Originally published on Wed November 16, 2011 6:20 pm

Alex Footman worked as an unpaid intern for the award-winning film Black Swan. He and another former unpaid intern for the movie are suing the film's production company for back pay.
Courtesy of Alex Footman

More than 1 million Americans a year work as interns. About half of them are unpaid.

Alex Footman was among them, until recently. He worked as an unpaid intern for Black Swan, a film that won numerous awards and grossed more than $300 million.

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2:46am

Sat November 12, 2011
Middle East

In Arab States, It's Good To Be The King

Jordan's King Abdullah II prepares to address parliament on Oct. 26. Like other Arab monarchs, the king has introduced limited changes in response to the uprisings in the Arab world this year.
Khalil Mazraawi AFP/Getty Images

Three Arab autocrats who ruled their countries for decades have been ousted from power this year, and others are in danger of being overthrown. Yet no king or emir has suffered such a fate.

Protests have taken place in countries ruled by monarchs, including Bahrain, which had widespread demonstrations last spring. And after protests in Morocco and Jordan, the kings offered up limited political changes that have, at least for now, staved off any real threat to their rule.

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12:51am

Sat November 12, 2011
Africa

Families Of Prisoners Pressure Libya's New Leaders

A woman outside the Hudba el-Gassi compound in Tripoli, Libya, holds up a sign asking, "Where's my father?" Once a military police base, Hudba el-Gassi is now a makeshift prison for regime loyalists and others rounded up by armed militiamen.
Sean Carberry NPR

In the new Libya, uncertainty is the one certainty.

Contradictions and conspiracies proliferate faster than street demonstrations now that the iron fist of dictator Moammar Gadhafi's regime has been lifted.

Among those searching for answers are relatives of prisoners locked away by various revolutionary military councils. Some of the prisoners are former Gadhafi loyalists with blood on their hands. But family members say others were seized for motives of revenge.

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12:06am

Sat November 12, 2011
Fresh Air Weekend

Fresh Air Weekend: Kirsten Dunst, Darrell Hammond

Originally published on Sat November 12, 2011 12:22 pm

Kirsten Dunst plays Justine, whose well-planned wedding takes place as a planet called Melancholia heads directly towards Earth.
Magnolia Pictures

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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6:49pm

Fri November 11, 2011
The Two-Way

Police Shutdown Occupy Burlington Encampment After Shooting

Police announced today that the continued occupation of City Hall Park in Burlington, Vt. was a risk to public safety and it could not continue.

Vermont Public Radio reports on what Police Chief Michael Schirling had to say:

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6:06pm

Fri November 11, 2011
The Two-Way

Rights Group Accuses Syria Of Crimes Against Humanity

Pro-democracy protesters, holding a huge pre-Baath era Syrian flag outside the Arab league headquarters in Cairo on November 2, 2011.
MOHAMMED HOSSAM MOHAMMED HOSSAM/AFP/Getty Images

Human Rights Watch today accused the Syrian government of committing crimes against humanity during its crackdown on the restive central region of Homs. The rights group called on the Arab League, scheduled to meet in Cairo tomorrow, to suspend Syria's membership in the organization.

"The systematic nature of abuses against civilians in Homs by Syrian government forces, including torture and unlawful killings, indicate that crimes against humanity have been committed," Human Rights Watch said in their 63-page report released today.

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5:54pm

Fri November 11, 2011
The Two-Way

The Video Game 'Call Of Duty' Sets Sales Record

Originally published on Fri November 11, 2011 5:57 pm

A customer buys a copy of "Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3" for the Xbox 360 during a launch event for the highly anticipated video game.
Ethan Miller Getty Images

Here's today's stunning figure: The video game Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 sold about 6.5 million copies the first day it went on sale. According to Activision Blizzard, which released the numbers today, that adds up to more than $400 million in sales in North America and the U.K.

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5:30pm

Fri November 11, 2011
The Record

'Stairway To Heaven' Turns 40: Celebrate With 7 Covers

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 4:25 pm

Heart's Nancy Wilson onstage in 1983, looking very Jimmy Page.
Paul Natkin WireImage

5:06pm

Fri November 11, 2011
The Two-Way

Occupy Oakland Movement Tries To Regroup After Shooting

An Occupy Oakland demonstrator lights a candle after a man was shot and killed near the Occupy Oakland camp.
Kimihiro Hoshino AFP/Getty Images

Is it fair to blame the Occupy Oakland encampment for a murder on its doorstep?

That's the question everyone's debating today here in Oakland, after a young African-American man was gunned down by the campsite Thursday at about 5 p.m.

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4:38pm

Fri November 11, 2011
The Two-Way

Penn State Assistant Coach McQueary Put On Leave

Penn State assistant football coach Mike McQueary.
Chris Gardner Getty Images

Penn State assistant coach Mike McQueary will not be at Saturday's game against Nebraska. During a press conference, Rod Erickson, the school's interim president, announced that McQueary had been placed under administrative leave.

As we had reported, the school said yesterday McQueary would not be at the game because it had received "multiple threats" against him.

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4:31pm

Fri November 11, 2011
The Record

And Then There Were Three: Universal Will Buy EMI

Originally published on Fri November 11, 2011 5:29 pm

The home of The Beatles is being remodeled — drastically.

EMI, until now one of the four remaining major labels, is being broken up and sold off by the megabank Citigroup. After an auction that took almost nine months, French media company Vivendi, which owns Universal Music Group, will buy EMI's recorded music division and Sony Corp. will pick up the publishing arm.

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4:30pm

Fri November 11, 2011
The Salt

Farmed Tilapia, With A Dash Of Antibiotic

A vendor at a fish market in Hong Kong.
SAMANTHA SIN AFP/Getty Images

Half of the world's seafood is raised on farms, and some of those fish are bound to get sick at some point. So fish farmers, just like animal farmers, are keen on dumping antibiotics — sometimes in huge quantities — in those fish pens to keep the population safe.

A discerning eater might want to know if the shrimp that hits the plate is laced with drug residues, given that some can cause antibiotic resistance and cancer. But a new study says there's no way to find out, given the sketchy state of seafood import monitoring.

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4:26pm

Fri November 11, 2011
Theater

Hugh Jackman, Back On Broadway And Having A Blast

Hugh Jackman
Joan Marcus

Hugh Jackman has had one of the most bifurcated showbiz careers imaginable. He leapt to superstardom as the mutton-chopped mutant Wolverine in the X-Men movies and won a Tony Award as the gay Australian entertainer Peter Allen in The Boy from Oz. These days, he's starring in the robot-boxing film Real Steel and appearing on Broadway in a one-man show.

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