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6:06pm

Fri November 11, 2011
The Two-Way

Rights Group Accuses Syria Of Crimes Against Humanity

Pro-democracy protesters, holding a huge pre-Baath era Syrian flag outside the Arab league headquarters in Cairo on November 2, 2011.
MOHAMMED HOSSAM MOHAMMED HOSSAM/AFP/Getty Images

Human Rights Watch today accused the Syrian government of committing crimes against humanity during its crackdown on the restive central region of Homs. The rights group called on the Arab League, scheduled to meet in Cairo tomorrow, to suspend Syria's membership in the organization.

"The systematic nature of abuses against civilians in Homs by Syrian government forces, including torture and unlawful killings, indicate that crimes against humanity have been committed," Human Rights Watch said in their 63-page report released today.

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5:54pm

Fri November 11, 2011
The Two-Way

The Video Game 'Call Of Duty' Sets Sales Record

Originally published on Fri November 11, 2011 5:57 pm

A customer buys a copy of "Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3" for the Xbox 360 during a launch event for the highly anticipated video game.
Ethan Miller Getty Images

Here's today's stunning figure: The video game Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 sold about 6.5 million copies the first day it went on sale. According to Activision Blizzard, which released the numbers today, that adds up to more than $400 million in sales in North America and the U.K.

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5:30pm

Fri November 11, 2011
The Record

'Stairway To Heaven' Turns 40: Celebrate With 7 Covers

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 4:25 pm

Heart's Nancy Wilson onstage in 1983, looking very Jimmy Page.
Paul Natkin WireImage

5:06pm

Fri November 11, 2011
The Two-Way

Occupy Oakland Movement Tries To Regroup After Shooting

An Occupy Oakland demonstrator lights a candle after a man was shot and killed near the Occupy Oakland camp.
Kimihiro Hoshino AFP/Getty Images

Is it fair to blame the Occupy Oakland encampment for a murder on its doorstep?

That's the question everyone's debating today here in Oakland, after a young African-American man was gunned down by the campsite Thursday at about 5 p.m.

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4:38pm

Fri November 11, 2011
The Two-Way

Penn State Assistant Coach McQueary Put On Leave

Penn State assistant football coach Mike McQueary.
Chris Gardner Getty Images

Penn State assistant coach Mike McQueary will not be at Saturday's game against Nebraska. During a press conference, Rod Erickson, the school's interim president, announced that McQueary had been placed under administrative leave.

As we had reported, the school said yesterday McQueary would not be at the game because it had received "multiple threats" against him.

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4:31pm

Fri November 11, 2011
The Record

And Then There Were Three: Universal Will Buy EMI

Originally published on Fri November 11, 2011 5:29 pm

The home of The Beatles is being remodeled — drastically.

EMI, until now one of the four remaining major labels, is being broken up and sold off by the megabank Citigroup. After an auction that took almost nine months, French media company Vivendi, which owns Universal Music Group, will buy EMI's recorded music division and Sony Corp. will pick up the publishing arm.

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4:30pm

Fri November 11, 2011
The Salt

Farmed Tilapia, With A Dash Of Antibiotic

A vendor at a fish market in Hong Kong.
SAMANTHA SIN AFP/Getty Images

Half of the world's seafood is raised on farms, and some of those fish are bound to get sick at some point. So fish farmers, just like animal farmers, are keen on dumping antibiotics — sometimes in huge quantities — in those fish pens to keep the population safe.

A discerning eater might want to know if the shrimp that hits the plate is laced with drug residues, given that some can cause antibiotic resistance and cancer. But a new study says there's no way to find out, given the sketchy state of seafood import monitoring.

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4:26pm

Fri November 11, 2011
Theater

Hugh Jackman, Back On Broadway And Having A Blast

Hugh Jackman
Joan Marcus

Hugh Jackman has had one of the most bifurcated showbiz careers imaginable. He leapt to superstardom as the mutton-chopped mutant Wolverine in the X-Men movies and won a Tony Award as the gay Australian entertainer Peter Allen in The Boy from Oz. These days, he's starring in the robot-boxing film Real Steel and appearing on Broadway in a one-man show.

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3:55pm

Fri November 11, 2011
'Radio Diaries'

The Bonus Army: How A Protest Led To The GI BIll

On July 28, officials sent in the Washington police to evict the marchers. The action was peaceful until someone threw a brick, the police reacted with force, and two bonus marchers were shot. The situation quickly spiraled out of control.
The National Archives

Occupy Wall Street protests have sprung up in cities across the U.S. — and around the world. The common denominator between them is protesters' commitment to stay and camp out. They've pitched tents and built large, impromptu communities.

It's a form of protest that echoes throughout American history.

In 1932, another group of protesters set up encampments and vowed to stay until their voices were heard.

The Bonus Army

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3:53pm

Fri November 11, 2011
The Two-Way

The Story Of A Guy And His Pet Buffalo

Jim Sautner and his pet buffalo Bailey Jr.
Stony Plain Reporter Spruce Grove Examiner

3:36pm

Fri November 11, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

This Is A Spinal Tap

The fictitious band from This Is Spinal Tap performs live at CBGB's in New York in 1984. Nigel Tufnel, the guitarist played by Christopher Guest, favored amplifiers whose volume could be cranked up to 11.
Ebet Roberts Getty Images

Today is special.

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3:30pm

Fri November 11, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Now Children Need Cholesterol Tests, Too

Next: "Test Me?"
iStockphoto.com

Children today are growing up fast — so fast that they're now being told to have their cholesterol tested before they hit puberty.

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3:00pm

Fri November 11, 2011
The Two-Way

No Firings At SEC For Missing Madoff's Massive Ponzi Scheme

Seven employees of the Securities and Exchange Commission have been disciplined, but no one has been fired, after investigations into how the agency failed to stop Bernard Madoff's massive Ponzi scheme despite repeated warnings that he was stealing billions of dollars from investors, The Washington Post reports.

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3:00pm

Fri November 11, 2011
From Our Listeners

Letters: Ninja Librarians; Master Of Library Science

Robert Siegel and Guy Raz revisit arguably one of the program's most memorable phrases this week: ninja librarians. Also, they address one listener's email about the degree of Master of Library Science.

2:57pm

Fri November 11, 2011
Newt Gingrich

For Gingrich, A Slow And Steady Climb To The Top

Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich talks with Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad (left) and PBS Nightly Business Report co-anchor and managing editor Tom Hudson during a Nov. 1 forum on manufacturing at Vermeer Manufacturing in Pella, Iowa.
Steve Pope Getty Images

As the Republican presidential candidates prepare for another debate, this one Saturday night in South Carolina, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich has been campaigning in New Hampshire.

He opened up his state headquarters Friday, buoyed by some recent polls that show his support increasing among Republican voters. A new CBS poll has him tied for second place with Mitt Romney, behind Herman Cain.

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2:20pm

Fri November 11, 2011
The Two-Way

'Blue Out' Planned At Penn State Game To Focus Attention On Victims

Originally published on Fri November 11, 2011 2:23 pm

The "stop child abuse" blue ribbon.
Blue Out PSU vs. Nebraska — Stop Child Abuse!

All the attention this week on the firing of Penn State football coach Joe Paterno, the protests afterward by many of the school's students and the actions or inaction of school officials when they learned that a former assistant football coach might have been sexually abusing young boy

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2:19pm

Fri November 11, 2011
Music Interviews

The Subspecies Of Pianists, Or, What Jerry Lee Lewis And Beethoven Share

Jerry Lee Lewis, a pianist Isacoff classifies as a 'combustible,' performs at the Rainbow in London in 1972.
Graham Wood Getty Images

The art of the piano is a study in evolution — of both an instrument and of human talent. Among us there have been a rare few whose gifts included the physical dexterity, the innate musicality and the creativity to make the instrument sound brilliant.

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2:15pm

Fri November 11, 2011
Music News

Vets Write Music To Heal The Wounds Of War

Originally published on Fri November 11, 2011 8:35 pm

In front of the Texas flag: Iraq vet and aspiring songwriter Buddy Lee Dobberteen.
John Burnett

Veterans Day is the day when Americans remember and thank members of the armed forces who fought in foreign wars. Nearly 1.4 million men and women have left the service since serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. A group of musicians in San Marcos, Texas, just down the highway from Austin, has started a songwriting workshop especially for returning veterans, believing that composing music can help a person heal from the wounds of war.

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1:54pm

Fri November 11, 2011
Europe

Berlusconi's Days As 'Great Seducer' May Be At End

Originally published on Fri November 11, 2011 3:10 pm

Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi delivers an address to Italy's Senate in December 2010. Berlusconi, whose political survival skills are legendary, promised to step down after the Senate approved an austerity package.
Alberto Pizzoli AFP/Getty Images

The man known as Italy's Great Seducer may have finally lost his charm.

Silvio Berlusconi, the country's scandal-plagued prime minister, survivor of some 50 confidence motions over the years and twice thrown out of office, says he will exit from the Italian political scene now that the nation's parliament has passed an austerity package.

That resignation could come as early as this weekend, although there has been speculation that Berlusconi could hang on until as late as February, when new elections are expected to be held.

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1:42pm

Fri November 11, 2011
The Two-Way

Mexico's Second-Highest Official Killed In Helicopter Crash

Mexican Interior Secretary Francisco Blake Mora.
Mexican Interior Ministry AFP/Getty Images

Mexican authorities say Secretary of the Interior Francisco Blake Mora, "the highest ranking official in the country after the president" and the person in charge of the fight against drug cartels, has been killed in a helicopter crash, The Associated Press reports from Mexico City. Seven other people also died, according to the Mexican government.

Reuters says that local media are reporting that the minister's helicopter went down south of Mexico City.

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1:33pm

Fri November 11, 2011
The Salt

Man On A Mission: Create The World's Hottest Chile

Ed Currie's chilis are not for the faint of heart, tongue or stomach.
Tanner Latham WFAE

1:00pm

Fri November 11, 2011
NPR Story

Rethinking How Kids Learn Science

How important are museums, TV shows and after school clubs to teaching kids science? Ira Flatow and guests look at "informal science education" and what researchers are learning about learning science. Plus, what's the best way to keep undergraduate science majors in science?

1:00pm

Fri November 11, 2011
NPR Story

Meet The MythBusters

Discovery Channel's MythBusters have taken on more than 700 myths, from how hard it is to find a needle in a haystack (it's hard) to whether toothbrushes have fecal matter on them (they do). Series hosts Jamie Hyneman and Adam Savage talk about the show with host Ira Flatow.

1:00pm

Fri November 11, 2011
Health

Cure Winter Blues With Light Therapy

Or The Beach — Seasonal depression, or seasonal affective disorder, affects some five percent of Americans in the winter as daily sunlight hours dwindle. Psychiatrist Richard A. Friedman discusses the evolutionary origins of the winter blues, and treatments ranging from light therapy to a trip to the beach.

1:00pm

Fri November 11, 2011
Author Interviews

'Steve Jobs': Profiling An Ingenious Perfectionist

For years, Steve Jobs courted biographer Walter Isaacson to write the definitive story of his life. When Isaacson learned how sick Jobs really was, he accepted. Here he discusses profiling the tech visionary, a task that often involved reconciling Jobs' recollections with those of his friends, family and colleagues.

1:00pm

Fri November 11, 2011
Animals

Hunt For A Vanishing Woodpecker

In 1956, dentist and amateur ornithologist William Rhein captured the rare Imperial woodpecker on 16 mm color film. Although this 85 second clip is the only known photographic record of the bird, Rhein kept the film to himself until after he died. Writer and bird fanatic Tim Gallagher tells the story of Rhein's expedition to look for the bird, and his own trip to the same mountains over 50 years later.

12:40pm

Fri November 11, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Tests Find Formaldehyde In More Hair Straighteners

A variety of hair-straightening products used in professional salons can expose both hairdressers and their customers to formaldehyde, an independent study finds. And the chemical can be really irritating, literally.

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12:25pm

Fri November 11, 2011
The Two-Way

MF Global Fires All 1,066 Brokerage Employees

The spectacular collapse of the brokerage unit at MF Global has now cost all 1,066 employees their jobs.

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12:23pm

Fri November 11, 2011
The Two-Way

Russia Running Out Of Time, As Mars Mission Seems Destined To Fail

Originally published on Fri November 11, 2011 3:58 pm

The Zenit-2SB rocket with Phobos-Grunt (Phobos-Soil) craft blasts off from its launch pad at the Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan.
Oleg Urusov AP

Russians are feeling pretty gloomy after spending days trying to contact a spacecraft aimlessly orbiting Earth.

The Phobos-Grunt spacecraft was destined for one of Mars' moons. As we reported earlier this week, it was supposed to scoop up some rocks and return home with its specimens, but one of its boosters failed to ignite and now it's stuck.

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12:10pm

Fri November 11, 2011
Movie Reviews

As The World Ends, A Certain 'Melancholia' Sets In

Kirsten Dunst's well-planned wedding takes place as a planet called Melancholia heads directly towards Earth.
Magnolia Pictures

Metaphors don't come balder than the one at the center of Lars von Trier's Melancholia. It's both the emotional state of the protagonist Justine, played by Kirsten Dunst, and also the name of a small planet on what might be a collision course with Earth. Actually, it does strike Earth in a lyrical, eight-minute, slow-motion prelude, but there's no way to know if that's real or a dream. Of course, the whole film can be taken as a dream, a bad but gorgeous one scored to the same few bars of Wagner's Tristan and Isolde.

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