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1:00pm

Thu November 3, 2011
Law

Second Chances, Not Jail Time, For Criminals

Originally published on Thu November 3, 2011 2:27 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, host: This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. If the threat of prison is supposed to deter crime, it's not working; record numbers are behind bars. And while all those bad actors off the street may contribute to lower crime rates in recent years, many believe there have to be better ways.

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12:07pm

Thu November 3, 2011
Music Reviews

Kelly Clarkson's Vocals Keep Getting 'Stronger'

Kelly Clarkson.
Harper Smith

Like a lot of successful American Idol contestants, Kelly Clarkson made her reputation as a belter — as someone who could project to the rafters and rouse a crowd — which doesn't necessarily translate into good pop singing. Ever since Bing Crosby started using the microphone as an instrument for achieving intimacy and nuance, the idea of delivering popular song as operatic aria is a flawed strategy. But everybody loves an anthem, right?

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12:00pm

Thu November 3, 2011
Food

Put Down The Fork — Lay Off The Pork

Some African-Americans have removed pork from their diets, while others proudly embrace it as a part of their culture. To hear more about the divide, host Michel Martin speaks with Natalie Moore, who wrote the essay "In Praise of Pork" for theRoot.com, and filmmaker Byron Hurt, producer of the documentary Soul Food Junkies.

12:00pm

Thu November 3, 2011
Politics

Under Political Stress, Turning To Spouses

GOP presidential hopeful Herman Cain is still facing questions on whether he sexually harassed women in the 1990s. But now his wife may step up to his defense. Reports say she'll do an exclusive interview with Fox News. Host Michel Martin discusses political spouses' roles with The Washington Post Political Reporter Nia-Malika Henderson, and The Chicago-Sun Times Washington Bureau Chief Lynn Sweet.

12:00pm

Thu November 3, 2011
Religion

Life Begins At Conception? Faith Leaders Debate

On November 8, Mississippi will vote on a controversial initiative that would define a fertilized egg as a person. If approved, it would effectively ban abortion, and possibly some forms of birth control. Pastor Jason Dillard says the initiative is important for preserving life. But Rev. Timothy McDonald III argues that it could harm women's health. They speak with host Michel Martin, who's also joined by NPR Correspondent Kathy Lohr.

12:00pm

Thu November 3, 2011
Your Money

Young Woman Wins Fight Against Big Bank

After facing public outcry and cancelled accounts, Bank of America abandoned plans to impose a monthly five dollar fee for debit card users. Twenty-two-year-old Molly Katchpole drew in more than 300,000 signatures for her online petition drive against the bank. She speaks with host Michel Martin.

11:51am

Thu November 3, 2011
The Salt

How Low-Fat Foods Get Their Texture

One way food companies compensate for the texture lost from lowering fat is by using replacements like cellulose gum.
iStockphoto.com

Pull any packaged food item off the shelf and chances are it has a long list of mysterious ingredients with highly scientific names like "methylcellulose." If you're like us, you may puzzle and even worry a little over these unappetizing words.

Why do we have so much weird stuff like methylcellulose and xanthum gum that's produced in a laboratory in our food? Texture, baby, texture. It's nearly impossible to understate the importance of texture and "mouth feel" to food companies, especially in an age when people fear the fat content in their food.

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11:40am

Thu November 3, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

A Disco Beat Isn't Enough For CPR Stardom

"Disco Science," which you may know from the movie Snatch, has joined the '70s hit "Stayin' Alive" and the British children's song "Nellie the Elephant" on a unique playlist.

The three songs have been found to help people compress the chest at the right rate. Unfortunately, adding music to the CPR mix doesn't improve its overall effectiveness, a new study finds.

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11:10am

Thu November 3, 2011
Digital Life

The War Between Google, Amazon, Facebook, Apple

Apple, Google, Facebook and Amazon are expanding rapidly into markets like media, TV, movies, finance, advertising, retail and mobile phones.
Stephanie d'Otreppe NPR

In the old days, Amazon sold books, Google was a search engine, Facebook was a social network and Apple sold computers.

But that's not the case anymore.

Google and Apple now sell phones. Amazon has gotten into the server business. Apple sells music. Facebook and Amazon provide online payment services. And that's just the beginning.

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10:35am

Thu November 3, 2011
The Two-Way

Daughter Beaten By Dad Who's A Texas Judge: It Happened Regularly

Originally published on Thu November 3, 2011 5:51 pm

Hillary Adams (left) as her father was striking her with a belt. She set up a video camera to record what she says was one of many such beatings.
YouTube.com (warning, video is graphic)

Hillary Adams, who videotaped her father beating her in 2004 and released it to the world last week because she believes he should not be serving as a judge in Texas, said this morning that such punishments happened regularly and that she believes her father "needs help and rehabilitation."

For his part, Judge William Adams says that "in my mind I haven't done anything wrong. ... She wasn't hurt, it was a long time ago" and she was just "being disciplined."

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9:57am

Thu November 3, 2011
Book Reviews

A Critic To Remember: Pauline Kael At The 'Movies'

Originally published on Thu November 3, 2011 12:16 pm

Pauline Kael was a film critic for The New Yorker from 1967 to 1991, as well as the author of several books, including I Lost It at the Movies and For Keeps: 30 Years at the Movies.

AP

To quote the immortal title of her 1965 collection of movie reviews, Pauline Kael may have "lost it at the movies," but she infinitely renewed her wide-eyed wonder as a moviegoer in her essays for The New Yorker magazine. Kael was no virgin as a critic when she started writing for The New Yorker in 1967 — but when she loved a movie, she always wrote like she was being touched for the very first time.

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9:15am

Thu November 3, 2011

8:46am

Thu November 3, 2011
The Two-Way

Jobless Claims Dip Below 400,000

There were 397,000 first-time claims for unemployment benefits last week, down 9,000 from the week before, the Employment and Training Administration just reported.

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8:15am

Thu November 3, 2011
The Two-Way

Cain Allegations: The Latest Developments

Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain during an appearance on Wednesday (Nov. 3, 2011) in McLean, Va.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Catching up on the latest news about the allegations, which he says are false, that Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain sexually harassed some women when he was heading the National Restaurant Association in the late 1990s:

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7:29am

Thu November 3, 2011
The Two-Way

Occupy Oakland Strike Turns 'Chaotic'

There's quiet now in the streets of Oakland, the local Tribune reports.

But what began as a "mostly peaceful" general strike that "drew thousands Wednesday for rallies and marches ... turned chaotic early Thursday after protesters took over a vacant building and police moved in, firing tear gas and flashbang grenades."

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7:14am

Thu November 3, 2011
The Two-Way

Along With Humans, Who Else Is In The 7 Billion Club?

Animal Kings: Ants, like these workers carrying eggs to a plant's leaf after rain flooded their nest, have a combined biomass estimated in the billions of tons.
Gurinder Osan AP

The revelation this week that the Earth now holds 7 billion people, according to the U.N.'s population division, prompted a question: Who else is in the 7 Billion Club? To find out which other animals had reached that plateau, we asked wildlife experts — and they patiently explained why our innocent question was nearly impossible to answer.

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6:19am

Thu November 3, 2011
Strange News

When ATM Machines Bite Back

Originally published on Thu November 3, 2011 7:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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6:15am

Thu November 3, 2011
Strange News

Woman Passes Driver's Test While In Labor

Originally published on Thu November 3, 2011 7:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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5:26am

Thu November 3, 2011
Around the Nation

Designer Brings Muslim Fashion To The Runway

Originally published on Thu November 3, 2011 7:54 am

A model wears one of Nailah Lymus's fascinators.

Courtesy of Nailah Lymus

5:10am

Thu November 3, 2011
Planet Money

When Governments Pay People To Have Babies

More, please.
Chung Sung-Jun Getty Images

How much is a baby worth?

Let's set aside for a moment all those goo-goo feeelings about that big ball of cute chubba-chubba. A baby is also an economic investment.

Businesses get a new worker and a new consumer for products. Parents get someone who will support them in their old age. Governments get a taxpayer — and a guarantee that the country lives on.

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5:00am

Thu November 3, 2011
Europe

Cannes Plays Host To An Economic Crisis

Originally published on Thu November 3, 2011 9:11 am

German Chancellor Angela Merkel talks to French President Nicolas Sarkozy on the eve of the G-20 summit in Cannes, France, on Wednesday. The European economic crisis is taking center stage at the summit.
Lionel Bonaventure AFP/Getty Images

The setting for this year's G-20 summit meeting is the Riviera Convention Center that hosts the Cannes Film Festival. President Obama will be walking the red carpet, but it's the European leaders who are stars of this show.

The Europeans are facing pressure to erect a financial "firewall" that will prevent the debt problems now plaguing Greece from spreading to the rest of the Continent and beyond.

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4:52am

Thu November 3, 2011
Economy

How Technology Is Eliminating Higher-Skill Jobs

Originally published on Thu November 3, 2011 11:43 am

Harvard Business School's Jayanth Iyengar (far left), Jonas Peter Akins and Genevieve Sheenan held their own, but eventually lost to IBM's Watson in a game of Jeopardy at a conference on jobs and technology.
Chris Arnold NPR

The U.S. economy hit an important milestone last week: Gross domestic product, the sum of all goods and services produced in the country, returned to pre-recession levels. But the gains were made with millions fewer workers. Part of the reason is technology, as computers and machines continue to replace humans.

We used to think about machines taking over mundane jobs, like twisting a screw into a toaster on an assembly line over and over again. But more recently, technology is eliminating higher-skill jobs.

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4:00am

Thu November 3, 2011
Politics

N.C. School Board Race Makes National Waves

Originally published on Tue November 8, 2011 8:01 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We're going to hear now about a very small race that's making big political waves. The race is for the school board of Wake County, North Carolina. It comes after a policy using family income to create economic diversity in the schools was tossed out by a Republican school board in 2009. This Tuesday, a runoff election for one seat on the board may put the Democrats back in the majority. Dave DeWitt of North Carolina Public Radio reports the school board race is attracting national attention and big money.

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4:00am

Thu November 3, 2011
Business

Business News

Originally published on Thu November 3, 2011 7:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with a bleaker forecast from the Fed. Just when we were beginning to hear some more positive economic news, the Federal Reserve reminds us not to get too excited. It's predicting slower growth and less improvement in the unemployment rate through 2013 than previously expected. This news comes after a two-day meeting of the Fed's policy-making committee, in which it decided against taking new measures to stimulate the economy for now.

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4:00am

Thu November 3, 2011
Business

Troubled First Solar, Inc. To Announce Earnings

Originally published on Thu November 3, 2011 7:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

First Solar, viewed as the golden child of the solar industry, hold its quarterly call today with nervous investors. They're on edge because the Arizona-based company announced a CEO shake-up late last month and have said almost nothing publically since then. From member station KJZZ in Phoenix, Peter O'Dowd reports.

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4:00am

Thu November 3, 2011
Business

Last Word

America's original discount store has filed for federal bankruptcy protection and plans to close its 46 stores. This isn't the first time the company has filed for bankruptcy, but it appears to be its last. The company cited increased competition from department stores, private-label discounters and the economic downturn.

4:00am

Thu November 3, 2011
Economy

China Warily Eyes E.U. Bailout

Originally published on Thu November 3, 2011 7:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. To understand the European debt crisis, it helps to keep track of both the short-term and the long-term. In the short-term, Europeans have agreed on a bailout deal that among other things would cut the debts of Greece. It's being held up by the Greek prime minister's plan to hold a referendum on austerity measures. Europeans have told Greece it's got to decide soon if it wants to be part of the eurozone or not.

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4:00am

Thu November 3, 2011
Around the Nation

Protesters Clash With Police In Oakland

About 3,000 people gathered at the Port of Oakland Wednesday, and effectively shut it down. People flooded the port area and blocked exits. The protest remained largely peaceful until the late evening, when police responded to a bonfire.

4:00am

Thu November 3, 2011
Economy

Harvard Economics Students Protest Perceived Bias

Originally published on Thu November 3, 2011 1:22 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Students at Harvard, yesterday, joined protests against income inequality.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Over the past 30 years...

GROUP: Over the past 30 years...

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: ...income inequality has risen...

GROUP: ...income inequality has risen...

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: ...to unacceptable levels.

GROUP: ...to unacceptable levels.

INSKEEP: Some students walked out of Economics 10 taught by a former advisor to President George W. Bush. The protestors included freshman Amanda Bradley.

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4:00am

Thu November 3, 2011
World

Infamous Arms Dealer Faces Life In Prison

Russian arms dealer Viktor Bout was found guilty of conspiring to sell weapons to South American terrorists Wednesday. Host Renee Montagne talks to Michael Sullivan about the conviction of the so-called "Merchant of Death."

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