NPR News

Pages

6:30pm

Wed January 18, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Many Older Women May Not Need Frequent Bone Scans

NPR journalist Gisele Grayson got her hip bone scanned a couple of years ago and discovered she has osteopenia.
NPR

The bone-thinning disease called osteoporosis is a big problem for women past menopause. It causes painful spine fractures and broken hips that plunge many women into a final downward spiral.

So it seemed to make sense to monitor older women's bones on a regular basis to see when they need to start taking drugs that prevent bone loss and fractures. Since Medicare will pay for a bone-density scan every two years, that's what many women have been getting.

Read more

6:13pm

Wed January 18, 2012
The Two-Way

Tarahumaras, Known For Running Great Distances, Are Facing A Food Crisis

This week, reports have started to filter out of the remote northern mountains of Mexico that the Tarahumara indians are facing hunger. The indians were immortalized by the book Born To Run, in which writer Christopher McDougall paints a portrait of a proud tribe that thrives on long distance running — a tribe that with little in their stomachs and even less on their feet, puts to shame even the best American ultra-marathoners.

Read more

5:30pm

Wed January 18, 2012
House & Senate Races

Two Democratic Allies Battle For One House Seat

Originally published on Tue March 6, 2012 6:15 pm

Reps. Dennis Kucinich and Marcy Kaptur on Sept 20, 2011, in Solon, Ohio. The state's new congressional district map has the two veteran Democrats now competing for the same congressional seat.
Amy Sancetta AP

Rep. Dennis Kucinich is most in his element when he's fighting against social injustice.

Wherever he sees an outrage against the little guy, you'll find the Ohio Democrat railing against it — like at a recent public meeting about a new trash-to-energy facility Cleveland wants to install in a west side neighborhood.

Read more

5:28pm

Wed January 18, 2012
It's All Politics

Keystone: Dead Pipeline Lives On As Election-Year Issue

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 5:47 pm

Now that President Obama has made his decision to reject the Keystone XL pipeline, an obvious question is what will it mean for the 2012 presidential election?

Obviously, no one really knows the answer to that though that won't stop weeks if not months of speculation.

The key to Keystone is, which side will have the most success in framing its case to enough voters for it to make a difference?

Read more

5:22pm

Wed January 18, 2012
The Two-Way

Goldman Sachs Post $1 Billion 4th Quarter Profit

The up and down markets from last year, took its toll even on Goldman Sachs, which is thought of as the rock star of investment banks.

Goldman posted a billion dollar profit during the last quarter of 2011. And while that may seem like a lot, it's 58 percent down. The AP reports that the profit follows a third quarter in which Goldman lost money for only the third time since it went public in 1999.

The AP adds:

Read more

5:09pm

Wed January 18, 2012
It's All Politics

In Former Steel Town, Residents Question GOP Candidates' 'Entitlement Society' Talk

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 7:27 pm

Almost every office building in downtown McKeesport, Pa., is abandoned or boarded up. Since the departure of the steel industry, the city's population has dropped from 55,000 to 19,000.
Pam Fessler NPR

Republican presidential candidates have had some harsh words about the role of government aid in the Obama administration.

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich calls President Obama the "food stamp president" and says more people are on food stamps than ever before because of his policies.

Read more

4:56pm

Wed January 18, 2012
Food

4,258 Miles Of Meat: Chef, Dad On A Quest For BBQ

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:06 am

Before setting off on her road trip, Molly Baz worked in the kitchen of Manhattan's Picholine restaurant. She says one of the things she'll miss most from her trip is the Southern hospitality — and the free snacks that came with it.
Douglas Baz

Until this fall, chef Molly Baz was working at an upscale Michelin-starred restaurant in New York City. But she decided to give that up to go on a road trip.

Molly wanted to learn everything she could about variations in American barbecue, so she planned a tour of the country's most renowned barbecue regions and invited her father, photographer Doug Baz, along for the ride. The pair documented their travels on their blog, Adventures in BBQ.

Read more

4:05pm

Wed January 18, 2012
The Salt

Bringing Home The Fries: Fast Food Comes By Delivery

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 7:03 pm

A Big Mac on two wheels? Egypt, pictured here, is one of 15 countries where the fast-food giant McDonald's delivers.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

In many countries, it's a cinch to call a local restaurant and get a freshly cooked dinner delivered, ready to eat amid the comforts of home. But in many parts of the U.S., the home delivery menu is usually limited to pizza and Chinese.

Burger King is trying to expand that menu by testing home delivery of burgers and fries, building on its success with home delivery overseas, including branches in Mexico, Turkey, Brazil, Colombia and Peru.

Read more

3:50pm

Wed January 18, 2012
The Two-Way

Was One Skier's Underwear Too Slick?

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 7:27 pm

Skier Tina Maze. She took her protest to the slopes in Italy, and to her Facebook page.
Tina Maze Official Fan Page

When Slovene World Cup Alpine skier Tina Maze opened her racing suit Sunday to reveal her sports bra beneath to all those looking on in Cortina D'Ampezzo, Italy, it wasn't some kind of sexy strip show or joyous Brandi Chastain type of moment.

It was a protest.

Over a fuss being made about her underwear.

Not the bra, mind you, or the words she had written on it: "Not your business."

Read more

3:27pm

Wed January 18, 2012
Around the Nation

The Oscars Of Livestock In The Mile High City

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 7:27 pm

Reece Aglin drove 700 miles from Circle, Mont., to show his purebred shorthorn.
Kirk Siegler KUNC

The single largest cattle show in the United States, the National Western Stock Show, is now under way in Denver. Fans roar overhead, keeping the air cool and the odors at bay, as Jeanette Fuller spiffs up her Black Angus — with product.

"High-strength hairspray, basically, just trying to get the hair to accentuate the good things about her and kind of cover up the bad things about her," Fuller says.

Read more

3:00pm

Wed January 18, 2012
NPR Story

Gettleman Discusses Violence In South Sudan

Audie Cornish speaks with Jeffrey Gettleman, East Africa bureau chief for the New York Times, about escalating violence in South Sudan.

3:00pm

Wed January 18, 2012
Energy

Keystone Proposal Rejected On Technicality

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 7:27 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Read more

3:00pm

Wed January 18, 2012
Technology

Are There Workarounds For Wikipedia's Blackout?

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Well it may be difficult to access Wikipedia today, but it's not impossible. Here with some Wikipedia workarounds is Brian Cooley, the editor at CNET. Welcome back, Brian.

BRIAN COOLEY: Thank you, Robert.

SIEGEL: And first, I want you tell us some different ways to get around the Wikipedia blackout today.

Read more

3:00pm

Wed January 18, 2012
Law

High Court Rules In Favor Of Death Row Inmate

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 8:00 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court has given an Alabama death row inmate another chance to fight his execution. By a 7-to-2 vote, the court ruled Wednesday that convicted murderer Cory Maples, "through no fault of his own," was denied the right to appeal because he was abandoned by his lawyers.

Maples was convicted in 1997 of murdering two friends and was sentenced to death. There is no doubt that he committed the crime; the doubt is whether he could have avoided the death penalty if he had been properly represented at trial.

Read more

2:53pm

Wed January 18, 2012
The Two-Way

TSA Backtracks, Says Screeners Were Wrong In Elderly Security Search

Transportation Security Administration (TSA) agents screen passengers at Los Angeles International Airport.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

The Transportation Security Administration now says security screeners at Kennedy Airport in New York were wrong when they asked two elderly women to show them medical devices that were under their clothing.

In a letter sent to state Sen. Michael Gianaris and acquired by the New York Daily News, the Department of Homeland Security said that there was no evidence the two women were strip-searched, as they claimed, but that their agents did go further than they should have.

Read more

2:53pm

Wed January 18, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Porn Industry Faces Condom Requirement In Los Angeles

In Los Angeles, condoms could soon be mandatory on the sets of adult films.
Libby Chapman iStockphoto.com

Advocates for the mandatory use of condoms in the production of porn films moved a step closer to victory in Los Angeles.

The city council there voted 9-1 in favor of an ordinance that would require use of condoms to protect performers from sexually transmitted diseases.

Under the new rule, filmmakers wouldn't get a permit to make a movie unless they comply with the condom requirement. The measure is expected to be signed into law, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Read more

2:10pm

Wed January 18, 2012
The Two-Way

Mark Wahlberg: With Me Aboard, 9/11 Hijackers Would Have Been Stopped

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 10:11 pm

Mark Wahlberg.
Jason Merritt Getty Images

Update at 9:45 p.m. ET. Wahlberg apologizes:

Saying his comments were "ridiculous ... irresponsible ... [and] insensitive," actor Mark Wahlberg has now apologized for saying he would have stopped 9/11 hijackers if he had been on one of the planes, Reuters reports.

Read what he's apologizing for in our original post:

Read more

2:08pm

Wed January 18, 2012
The Two-Way

Congress Set For Another Debt Ceiling Vote, But This Time It's Merely Symbolic

The U.S. House of Representatives will likely vote today to disapprove of raising the debt ceiling by $1.2 trillion. If you remember, the last time a vote of this kind went down, it was a dramatic showdown that rattled markets and was cited as one of the prime reasons S&P downgraded the United States' debt rating.

Today's vote however will be symbolic. The debt ceiling will likely be raised no matter how Congress votes.

Our Newscast desk spoke to NPR's Andrea Seabrook, who explained the vote like this:

Read more

2:04pm

Wed January 18, 2012
Politics

Previewing Three 2012 Senate Races To Watch

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 2:09 pm

Transcript

JOHN DONVAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm John Donvan in Washington. Huntsman hangs up his cleats, Wisconsin Dems step up to the plate, and Newt Gingrich swings for the fences in South Carolina. It is Wednesday and time for a...

NEWT GINGRICH: Paychecks versus food stamps...

DONVAN: Edition of the Political Junkie.

PRESIDENT RONALD REAGAN: There you go again.

VICE PRESIDENT WALTER MONDALE: When I hear your new ideas, I'm reminded of that ad: Where's the beef?

Read more

2:03pm

Wed January 18, 2012
Europe

Italy's Cruise Crisis Spawns An Unlikely Star

Italian coast guard Capt. Gregorio De Falco (center) has become a national hero for ordering the captain of a sinking cruise liner to get back onboard and oversee the ship's evacuation. Here, De Falco arrives in court for a hearing on Tuesday.
Giacomo Aprili AP

Five days after a cruise liner slammed into rocks off Italy's Tuscan coast, the country is gripped by the contrasting profiles of two key figures in the drama — the captain charged with abandoning ship and the captain who demanded he get back onboard.

For many Italians, the accident has become a metaphor for a country that sees itself mired in economic and moral decline.

Francesco Schettino, the disgraced captain of the 1,000-foot-long floating palace known as the Costa Concordia, is under house arrest on suspicion of multiple manslaughter, shipwreck and abandoning ship.

Read more

1:20pm

Wed January 18, 2012
The Two-Way

Would You Burn Your Cash To Stay Warm And Alive? This Man Did

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 1:26 pm

Yong Chun Kim, talking at his home about the experience of being lost in a blizzard for two days.
Ted S. Warren AP

We saw stories earlier this week about a man who was lost for two nights in Mount Rainier National Park over the weekend, but survived in part because he burned the money he was carrying to keep warm as a blizzard blew through the area.

But a critical question wasn't answered until today. — how much money went up in flames?

Read more

1:18pm

Wed January 18, 2012
It's All Politics

Newt Gingrich Says In 2010, He Paid 31 Percent In Taxes

Countering Mitt Romney's announcement that he paid 15 percent in taxes, Newt Gingrich said his bill came to 31 percent, more than most Americans pay and closer to the top rate of 35 percent.

The AP reports that Gingrich was careful not to criticize Romney for paying a lower tax rate than most Americans.

"My goal is not to raise Mitt Romney's taxes, but to let everyone pay Romney's rate," he said according to the AP.

Read more

1:00pm

Wed January 18, 2012
NPR Story

Freedom Not 'Paradise' For 'West Memphis Three'

In 1994, three teens were convicted of the murder of three boys in West Memphis, Ark. The trial drew national attention, due in part to the documentary series Paradise Lost. The "West Memphis Three" appealed their convictions and were released from prison in August 2011.

1:00pm

Wed January 18, 2012
On Disabilities

Learning To Love, And Be Loved, With Autism

Emotions can be hard to gauge in the beginning of any romantic relationship. But for people with autism, who often struggle to interpret social cues, romance can be particularly challenging to navigate. And for some, the prospect of loving and being loved seems out of reach.

12:41pm

Wed January 18, 2012
It's All Politics

A Family Of 'Boots For Newt' Hits The Ground In South Carolina

Alexandra Ziegler, age 9, leafletting for Gingrich in Greenville, S.C.
Melissa Block NPR

Sometimes it takes a family to campaign for a presidential candidate, and that's just what Melissa Block, co-host of NPR's All Things Considered, discovered while in South Carolina this week ahead of the state's Saturday primary.

Sondra Ziegler, a volunteer for GOP presidential candidate Newt Gingrich's campaign, is making herself useful any way she can — along with her three children and her mother.

Read more

12:29pm

Wed January 18, 2012
It's All Politics

McCain's 2008 Anti-Mitt Romney Oppo Research Raised 2012 Themes

A document that purportedly represents opposition research targeting Mitt Romney from Sen. John McCain's 2008 presidential campaign was posted online by Buzzfeed reporter Andy Kaczynski.

Immediately noticeable is how many of criticisms of Romney by his rivals during the current race for the Republican presidential nomination could just have easily come from McCain's opposition research of four years ago.

Read more

12:06pm

Wed January 18, 2012
The Two-Way

Reports: Obama Will Reject Keystone Pipeline Proposal

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 4:20 pm

Atkinson, Neb., rancher Bruce Boettcher, who opposes the Keystone XL pipeline, kicks up sand on his land, to demonstrate the fragility of the sandhills near the planned route of the pipeline.
Nati Harnik AP

Saying it did not have sufficient time to properly vet the proposal, the State Department said it would recommend rejecting a proposal by TransCanada to build a 1,700 mile pipeline, which would carry oil from Canada to refineries in Texas.

Read more

12:00pm

Wed January 18, 2012
Movie Interviews

Dolly Parton Makes A 'Joyful Noise' On Big Screen

Oscar nominees Dolly Parton and Queen Latifah star in the new film Joyful Noise. Parton wrote a dozen songs for the movie. "Well, I love to write," she says. "Especially when I've got a challenge."
Courtesy of Van Redin

What would you do if the little town you lived in — and loved — was slowly dying, with no jobs and little hope?

In the new film Joyful Noise, a small-town Georgia church faces hard times with hallelujahs when a national competition offers their financially strapped choir its only chance at survival.

Read more

12:00pm

Wed January 18, 2012
Politics

Why Vote On Tuesday? Why Not The Weekend?

The U.S. has repeatedly ranked low in voter turnout, compared to other G8 countries. Jacob Soboroff of the group 'Why Tuesday?' says the antiquated voting law is putting America's democracy on the back burner. He speaks with host Michel Martin about why his group, with support from liberals and conservatives, is pushing to move election days.

12:00pm

Wed January 18, 2012
Education

Mexican American Studies: Bad Ban Or Bad Class?

In Arizona, the Tucson Unified School District governing board recently voted to suspend the controversial Mexican American studies program. The move came after the state superintendent John Huppenthal deemed the program in violation of a state law banning, among other things, classes that promote resentment toward a race or class. He speaks with host Michel Martin.

Pages