NPR News

Pages

4:00am

Wed October 19, 2011
Business

American Airlines To Report 3rd Quarter Earnings

Originally published on Wed October 19, 2011 1:21 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

All of the major U.S. airlines are expected to report a profit for the third quarter, except for American Airlines. Its earnings come out later today. If United Airlines and Delta can make money in this economy, what's the problem with American? NPR's Wade Goodwyn explains.

Read more

4:00am

Wed October 19, 2011
Business

Fed Chairman Want Better Communication With The Public

Ari Shapiro talks to David Wessel, of "The Wall Street Journal," about why the Federal Reserve and its Chairman Ben Bernanke are very unpopular these days.

4:00am

Wed October 19, 2011
Election 2012

Ariz. Retirees React To GOP Debate

Older voters were President Obama's weakest age group in his 2008 win. They were the GOP's strongest in 2010. Some members of the Saddlebrooke Republican Club near Tucson, Ariz., watched the debate on TV and discussed the issues that resonated with them.

4:00am

Wed October 19, 2011
Economy

Greek Parliament To Vote On New Austerity Package

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, host: Unions are shutting down Greece today in what a prominent Greek newspaper calls the mother of all strikes. Flights are grounded, state offices are shuttered and shops are closed in the biggest organized protest against austerity measures since the debt crisis began almost two years ago. This week, parliament is expected to pass the latest package of cuts. But the protests show that the country's big unions will continue to resist. Joanna Kakississ has this story from Athens.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

Read more

12:01am

Wed October 19, 2011
2 Languages, Many Voices: Latinos In The U.S.

U.S. Hispanics Choose Churches Outside Catholicism

Originally published on Wed October 19, 2011 1:21 pm

Natalie Ochoa (left) and her mother, Betty Ochoa, say that services at the New Life Covenant church are less formal than those of the Catholic church they once attended.

Barbara Bradley Hagerty NPR

As their numbers grow, Latinos are not only changing where and how they worship; they're also beginning to affect the larger Christian faith.

You can see evidence of that in the Assemblies of God, once a historically white, suburban Pentecostal denomination. When you walk into the denomination's largest church, it's sensory overload: The auditorium is jam-packed with hundreds of Latino worshipers singing in Spanish, swaying and dancing.

Read more

12:01am

Wed October 19, 2011
Job 1: Careers That Shaped The GOP Candidates

In White House Run, Cain Counts On Corporate Skill

Herman Cain became a vice president at Pillsbury, left that job and started over at Burger King, where he climbed the corporate ladder again. Eventually, he became CEO of Godfather's Pizza, which he is credited with turning.

Robert Paskach The Omaha World-Herald

Fourth in a series

Read more

12:01am

Wed October 19, 2011
Middle East

Palestinians Try Alternate U.N. Route, Worrying U.S.

Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas (left) hands over a formal letter for Palestine to be admitted as a state to the U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon during the 66th U.N. General Assembly at the United Nations headquarters in New York, Sept. 23. Now, the Palestinians are pursuing full membership in other U.N. agencies.

Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

With the Palestinian membership bid sitting — and likely going nowhere — in the U.N. Security Council, the Palestinians are trying another route to upgrade their international status.

They are applying for full membership in UNESCO, the U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, and may do the same with other specialized U.N. agencies.

And that has diplomats at the State Department increasingly concerned about what impact this may have on the U.S. position in the U.N. system.

Read more

12:01am

Wed October 19, 2011
Around the Nation

Revolutionary Oil Skimmer Nets $1 Million X Prize

In a large tank set up to test oil-skimming devices, rows of spinning plastic disks separate oil from water.

Elastec/American Marine

A breakthrough in oil cleanup technology allows crews to skim spilled oil off the water's surface at a much faster rate. The new device wasn't developed by Exxon, BP or any of the major oil companies — it's the work of Elastec/American Marine, based in Illinois. And the design won the company a rich award from the X Prize Foundation.

Oil is attracted to plastic. And water is not. That, in essence, is the basis of Elastec's new skimmer.

Read more

12:01am

Wed October 19, 2011
Energy

Fight Over Nuclear Plant Draws N.Y. Political Heavies

Originally published on Wed October 19, 2011 1:21 pm

The nuclear power plant at Indian Point in Buchanan, N.Y., is seen with the Hudson River in the foreground. Gov. Andrew Cuomo's stated resolve to close Indian Point has sparked a debate about the energy outlook for metropolitan New York.

Seth Wenig AP

New York's political titans are clashing over the future of a controversial nuclear plant north of New York City.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo wants to close the aging Indian Point nuclear plant because of safety concerns. But the plant, which wants to extend its original licenses for another 20 years, has some powerful allies of its own.

Read more

12:01am

Wed October 19, 2011
Music

Girl In A Coma: Rockers Tackle Their Second Language

Originally published on Fri October 21, 2011 4:19 pm

Girl in a Coma performs in both English and Spanish — though none of the members is fluent in the latter.

Josh Huskin Courtesy of the artist

Girl in a Coma is a trio of young women from San Antonio who play rock music — loud rock music — in both English and Spanish. Lead singer and songwriter Nina Diaz, 23, is the youngest member of the band. Her sister Phannie plays drums, while their longtime friend Jenn Alva slaps the bass. Girl in a Coma is signed to Blackheart Records — a label owned by rocker Joan Jett — and takes its name from the song "Girlfriend in a Coma" by The Smiths.

Read more

10:00pm

Tue October 18, 2011
Sweetness And Light

Sometimes, One Is Enough

Bored with a best-of-seven series? Frank Deford has some alternative suggestions.

Paul Giamou iStockphoto.com

Sometimes in sports, like in the rest of life, stuff just hangs around because, well, it's always been there. Such is the best-of-seven game series to determine our champions of professional baseball, basketball and hockey.

A seven-game series is a wretched excess, and I'm going to tell you why, but nobody in charge is going to pay any attention to me because a best-of-seven series has just always been the way of the world.

Read more

9:01pm

Tue October 18, 2011
Environment

Six Miles Offshore: The Wreck Of Montebello

An unmanned ROV (remotely operated vehicle) is launched 900 feet underwater to study the wreckage of the SS Montebello.

Robert Schwemmer NOAA/USCG

A task force is evaluating the risk posed by a sunken oil tanker, the SS Montebello. It went to the bottom after being attacked by a Japanese submarine during World War II. State and federal officials want to know if the ship is still carrying its cargo of oil, and if that oil could escape.

At stake is a coastline known for its stunning scenery and wildlife sanctuaries. The task force was put together a couple of years ago at the urging of state Sen. Sam Blakeslee.

Read more

7:04pm

Tue October 18, 2011
The Two-Way

Must Watch Video: Quantum Levitation

A levitating puck.

Youtube

This is coolest thing we've seen in a long time:

The video was posted to YouTube two days ago by the Association of Science-Technology Centers and has already garnered 641,230 views. But what is going on here? It's quantum levitation, dude!

Read more

6:40pm

Tue October 18, 2011
The Two-Way

Cain's 9-9-9 Plan Would Cut Taxes For Millionaires; Raise Them For Poor

Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain campaigns on Oct. 15 in Cookeville, Tenn.

Mark Humphrey AP

The first detailed analysis of Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain's 9-9-9 tax plan found that it would cut taxes for Americans making $200,000 or more a year and raise taxes for those making less than $200,000 a year.

The analysis was released today by the independent Tax Policy Center, a joint venture by the Brookings Institution and the Urban Institute.

Read more

5:57pm

Tue October 18, 2011
The Two-Way

Hamas Official: Prisoner Swap Was Victory For All Palestinians

In two interviews, today, NPR's Robert Siegel got reaction from Hamas and the Israeli government over a prisoner swap deal that freed Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit and 1,027 Palestinian prisoners.

When Robert asked Osama Hamdan, a senior official from the Hamas international relations department, what the deal meant for future relations between Hamas and Israel, Hamdan said it "depends on the Israeli side."

Read more

5:00pm

Tue October 18, 2011
The Two-Way

'The Sense Of An Ending' By Julian Barnes Awarded Booker Prize

Julian Barnes is the author of Metroland, Flaubert's Parrot and England, England.

Alan Edwards Knopf

Judges announced that Julian Barnes' The Sense Of An Ending was awarded the 2011 Man Booker Prize. The Leicester-born Barnes was a Booker finalist three times before: in 1984 for his novel Flaubert's Parrot; in 1998 for England, England and in 2005 for Arthur and George

The AP reports:

Judges announced the winner of the 50,000 pound ($82,000) prize Tuesday at a ceremony in London.

Read more

4:41pm

Tue October 18, 2011
It's All Politics

What Word Comes To Mind When You Think Of The GOP Candidates?

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 5:17 pm

How to explain Herman Cain's ascent among Republican presidential candidates?

Perhaps a partial reason is that he so far evokes more positive than negative responses among Republicans and GOP leaning independents in a Pew Research Center/Washington Post survey than two other highly touted candidates in the race, Mitt Romney and Texas Gov. Rick Perry.

Read more

4:35pm

Tue October 18, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

When It Comes To Baby's Crib, Experts Say Go Bare Bones

A pediatrician says parents often mistakenly believe all baby accessories are safe.

iStockphoto.com

No more blankets in the baby's bed. Not even when it's cold outside. No bumpers, pillows, or toys. All these accoutrements are hazards for newborns and infants, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, which has released new expanded guidelines for reducing deaths from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, or SIDS, and other causes including suffocation, entrapment and asphyxia.

Read more

4:34pm

Tue October 18, 2011
Fine Art

New Paintings Reignite The Bob Dylan Copycat Debate

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 8:23 pm

The Asia Series is Bob Dylan's first exhibit in New York.

William Claxton AP

Legendary songwriter Bob Dylan is once again at the center of a controversy about plagiarism, but this time it's not about his words or his music — it's about his painting.

The Asia Series, Dylan's current one-man show at the Gagosian Gallery in New York, was initially billed as the musician's visual response to his travels through Asia. But as it turns out, many of the pictures are direct copies from historical photographs.

Read more

4:13pm

Tue October 18, 2011
Business

Cultivating A Wine Market In N.Y.'s Finger Lakes

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 5:50 pm

Grapes hang in a vineyard overlooking Canandaigua Lake in the Finger Lakes region of upstate New York.

Randall Tagg AP

New York's Finger Lakes region is named for its 11 long, thin lakes that run north to south below Lake Ontario. As it turns out, the hills surrounding these lakes are fertile ground for grapes, and the region is starting to gain recognition for its wines.

But because of the nature of marketing and selling new wines, it's still pretty tough to buy a bottle from the Finger Lakes region.

The area does have a long history of growing grapes: There have been wild grapes there for untold centuries. The vines are hardy and able to withstand occasional subzero temperatures.

Read more

3:31pm

Tue October 18, 2011
Middle East

Freed Israeli Soldier Seeks Return To 'Quiet Life'

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:19 am

Released Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit (second from right), walks with Israeli Defense Minster Ehud Barak (left), Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (second from left) and Israeli Chief of Staff Lt. Gen. Benny Gantz, at the Tel Nof Air base in southern Israel on Tuesday. Shalit was freed after more than five years of captivity in the Gaza Strip.

Israel Defense Ministry AP

In a dramatic day that took him from captivity in the Gaza Strip to his home village in northern Israel, soldier Gilad Shalit was freed Tuesday after more than five years as a prisoner of Palestinian militants.

His release was cause for celebration in Israel, and nowhere more so than in Mitzpe Hila, where he was welcomed by several hundred neighbors and close friends who had long pressed for his release.

Read more

3:06pm

Tue October 18, 2011
Sports

Analysts Point To Several Factors In Wheldon's Death

When the race cars began to collide Sunday on the Las Vegas Motor Speedway, Dr. Terry Trammell immediately muted his television. He watched in silence to focus on the signs of injury based on car positions and how the safety crew was responding. When he saw the helicopter arrive, he knew that someone was severely injured. Dan Wheldon, a two-time Indianapolis 500 winner, was pronounced dead two hours later.

Read more

3:01pm

Tue October 18, 2011
Latin America

In Mexico, Tourism Survives Bloody Drug War

Mexico has launched a publicity blitz to attract more tourists. The vast majority of tourists travel to just one of a half-dozen destinations in Mexico — including Cancun, shown here last year — far from the drug violence.

Gustavo Graf Bloomberg via Getty Images

Yes, the drug war has created an image problem. But Mexico has launched an aggressive publicity blitz to try to attract more tourists, and it seems to be succeeding.

Even President Felipe Calderon is involved in the full court press to tout the wonders, delicacies and marvels of Mexico to potential visitors.

On the PBS program The Royal Tour of Mexico, Calderon serves as the on-camera guide for TV host Peter Greenberg. The president leads a zip-line tour across a rain forest, rappels into a cave, climbs Mayan ruins and snorkels along a coral reef.

Read more

2:57pm

Tue October 18, 2011
It's All Politics

GOP Las Vegas Debate Finds Focus On Cain As Romney Cruises

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 8:09 pm

Mitt Romney and Nevada Lt. Gov. Brian Krolicki (r) take photos with supporters as Romney opens his state headquarters in Las Vegas, October 17, 2011.

Ethan Miller Getty Images

As Republican presidential candidates gird for their eighth debate, this one in Las Vegas, Nev., Tuesday evening, a central question is: how will the Herman Cain phenomenon shape the event?

With the one-time pizza company CEO near or at the top of the GOP field depending on which poll you consult, he's likely to draw more attention from the other candidates at the debate than was true in any of their previous meetings. The two-hour debate will be carried by CNN at 8 pm ET.

Read more

2:50pm

Tue October 18, 2011
The Two-Way

Police: BlackBerry Outage Led To Fewer Traffic Accidents In Abu Dhabi

Damien Meyer AFP/Getty Images

As Mark has reported, BlackBerry users faced a text messaging outage for three days straight last week. Yesterday, BlackBerry offered some customers $100 in free apps as an apology.

Read more

2:45pm

Tue October 18, 2011
NPR Story

Buckley: We Can Still Learn A Lot From 'Catch-22'

Joseph Heller first published his American classic, Catch-22, 50 years ago this October. Set off the coast of Italy during the Second World War, Catch-22 tells the story of an American bomber named Yossarian coming to grips with the realities and absurdities of war.

More than ten million copies have sold since its first publication but it didn't win a single literary prize at publication. Still, a number of people fell for it — hard — according to Heller's friend, writer Christopher Buckley.

Read more

2:17pm

Tue October 18, 2011
NPR Story

The Things Roz Chast Hates, 'From A To Z'

New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast says she is sure of two things: she is an anxious person, and she knows her alphabet by heart. So, in her new book What I Hate: From A to Z, Chast puts her dislikes and fears in alphabetical order with a full-page cartoon for each of her 26 anxieties.

Some are standard fears — H is for heights and E is for elevators — while others are a bit more irrational — S is for spontaneous human combustion and Y is for yellow.

NPR's Neal Conan talks with Chast about what she hates, from A to Z.

Read more

2:09pm

Tue October 18, 2011
U.S.

Maine Strained By Use Of Cocaine-Like 'Bath Salts'

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 10:48 pm

Although Shane Heathers was warned about the dangers of using synthetic stimulants known as bath salts, he said he wanted to try the drug anyway. He injected it day and night for a week before he ended up at the hospital. Several more bath salts binges followed.

Jay Field for NPR

States across the country continue to fight the spread of a dangerous new drug: bath salts.

They aren't anything like those soothing crystals you pour into the tub — they're synthetic stimulants, so-called designer drugs that cause paranoid, psychotic, often violent behavior in users.

Bath salts can still be purchased legally in some states and, in some cases, over the Internet.

Read more

2:01pm

Tue October 18, 2011
Law

Businesses Push Back On Foreign Bribery Law

One of the federal government's few success stories when it comes to policing corporate crime in recent years comes from a post-Watergate law called the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, or FCPA.

Prosecutors have used the law to get more than $1 billion in bribery fines out of huge companies like Siemens and DaimlerChrysler.

But now the U.S. Chamber of Commerce is pushing back: It has hired former Justice Department leaders to make the case that the law is out of date.

Critics: Law Has Huge Consequences

Read more

1:46pm

Tue October 18, 2011
The Two-Way

Policy Reversed: Marines May Wear 'KIA Bracelets' Honoring The Fallen

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 2:10 pm

Petty Officer 3rd Class Matthew Nolen, a corpsman with Company L, 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, wears a memorial bracelet or KIA (killed in action) bracelet in honor of his fallen squad leader Cpl. Michael W. Ouellette, who was killed during a patrol in Afghanistan.

Sgt. Michael S. Cifuentes marines.mil

"The Marine Corps is ending its controversial ban on bracelets honoring U.S. troops killed in combat," Marine Corps Times is reporting.

Read more

Pages