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8:50am

Sat October 15, 2011
Sports

117 Years Of Racing Stats Put To Pasture At The Track

The Daily Racing Form is the newspaper of the thoroughbred industry. The first one was published in Chicago on Nov. 17, 1894. The Keeneland race track in Lexington, Ky., holds a vast collection and is attempting to establish a digital archive.

Noah Adams NPR

Many horse racing fans swear by — and sometimes possibly at — the Daily Racing Form. It's the newspaper of the thoroughbred industry.

Before you bet that exacta, you can check out a horse's pedigree, race experience and morning workout times. You'll see which mares have been bred to which stallions.

The Keeneland race track in Lexington, Ky., holds a vast collection of Daily Racing Form issues, and further efforts are under way to preserve every issue and establish a digital archive.

Want To Pick A Winner? Read The Form

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8:12am

Sat October 15, 2011
Afghanistan

U.S. Base Assaulted In Eastern Afghanistan

Originally published on Sat October 15, 2011 10:42 am

Militants tried to blast their way into an American base in eastern Afghanistan on Saturday, striking before dawn with rocket-propelled grenades and a vehicle packed with explosives.

The attackers failed to breach the gate of the base in Panjshir province's Rakha district, though they did hit a security tower with a rocket-propelled grenade, said provincial Police Chief Gen. Mohammad Qasim Jangalbagh.

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8:12am

Sat October 15, 2011
Middle East

U.S., Europe Shield Syrian Dissidents Abroad

Originally published on Sat October 15, 2011 3:28 pm

While much of the focus this past week has been on an alleged Iranian plot to kill the Saudi ambassador to the U.S., diplomats and law enforcement officials in the U.S. and Europe also began to take aim at Syria for an alleged conspiracy to intimidate dissidents abroad.

Syrian-American Mohamad Soueid was indicted in the U.S. on charges he passed information about dissidents back to the country's intelligence services.

On Monday, a judge is set to decide whether he should remain in prison pending his trial.

An Agent Of The Syrian Government?

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8:00am

Sat October 15, 2011
NPR Story

Sports: Baseball Playoffs And An NFL Game To Watch

Baseball playoffs are heating up with pennants on the line. Over in the NFL, the game everyone's watching this week is a battle of rising teams. Meanwhile, the NBA is still locked out, and if it stays that way, it could mean no Christmas games. Host Scott Simon and NPR's Tom Goldman talk sports.

8:00am

Sat October 15, 2011
NPR Story

'Moneycrats,' 'Devil Fish' And More Wall Street Protests

Protests against big banks and Wall Street are nothing new in American history. Host Scott Simon talks to Professor Steven Fraser of Columbia University about how the Occupy Wall Street protests fit into that history.

8:00am

Sat October 15, 2011
Simon Says

Baseball's New Bling Is Made For Believers

In this week's essay, host Scott Simon reflects on the comforting superstitions of athletes.

8:00am

Sat October 15, 2011
Around the Nation

Wall Street Protesters More Savvy Than Sloppy

Originally published on Sat October 15, 2011 11:07 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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8:00am

Sat October 15, 2011
Politics

Recall Election Targets Ala. Immigration Law Author

A relatively small election is getting intense interest in Arizona. It's an election to recall State Sen. Russell Pearce, the architect of Arizona's strict immigration laws. As NPR's Ted Robbins reports, the recall election is splitting the community along religious as much as political lines.

8:00am

Sat October 15, 2011
Africa

Healing War-Torn Liberia Takes More Than Elections

Liberia held presidential elections this week. The front runner and current president of Liberia is Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, who was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize this month. But awards notwithstanding, Liberia remains a place recovering from a 14-year-long civil war, with much of the country too poor even to have electric power or clean running water. Scott Simon talks with Tim Butcher, former Africa correspondent for The Daily Telegraph, about the challenges facing the country.

8:00am

Sat October 15, 2011
Around the Nation

Bishop Indicted: A First For The Abuse Scandal

A grand jury has indicted the Roman Catholic bishop of Kansas City for failing to report suspected child sexual abuse. Bishop Robert Finn has pleaded not guilty to a misdemeanor count of not reporting to police that he had seen child pornography on a priest's computer. It's the first time a bishop has been indicted since the church abuse scandal became public 25 years ago. NPR's Barbara Bradley Hagerty reports.

8:00am

Sat October 15, 2011
Around the Nation

The Unexpected Emerges From Ala. Immigration Law

Alabama has what many consider to be the strictest anti-immigration law in the country. Now that the law has been in effect for a few weeks, the state's residents are starting to see what some of the unintended consequences are. Andrew Yeager of member station WBHM reports from Birmingham.

8:00am

Sat October 15, 2011
From Our Listeners

Your Letters: The Military-Civilian Gap

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, host: Time for your letters.

(SOUNDBITE OF TYPEWRITER AND MUSIC)

SIMON: Hundreds of responses to a story last week by NPR's Tom Bowman about a study by the Pew Research Center. The study found many civilians and military leaders don't share the same views on patriotism, or on who should bear the burdens of war in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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6:53am

Sat October 15, 2011
The Two-Way

'Rapture' Prophet Camping: World Will 'Probably' End Quietly Next Friday

Harold Camping speaks during a taping of his show Open Forum in Oakland, Calif., on May 23, 2011.

Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

When we last heard from Harold Camping, the Family Radio broadcaster was conceding he'd been wrong about The Rapture beginning on May 21 — a prediction that had some folks selling their worldly possessions and traveling the nation to warn that the end was coming soon.

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6:52am

Sat October 15, 2011
The Picture Show

A Woman Of Photos And Firsts, Ruth Gruber At 100

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:20 am

Ruth Gruber, Alaska, 1941-43

Photographer unknown Courtesy of International Center of Photography

At the age of 100, Ruth Gruber is responsible for a lot of firsts. When she was just 20, she became the youngest Ph.D. ever at the University of Cologne in Germany. She was the first photojournalist, much less female journalist, to travel to and cover both the Soviet Arctic and Siberian gulag. She documented Holocaust survivors and the plight of the ship, the Exodus 1947.

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5:09am

Sat October 15, 2011
Around the Nation

'NextGen' Air Traffic System Has Yet To Take Off

Originally published on Sat October 15, 2011 3:35 pm

An air traffic controller monitors flights in July at the Denver International Airport. The Federal Aviation Administration is planning to modernize its traffic control system, but has faced a number of obstacles.

John Moore Getty Images

The government is trying to modernize the nation's air traffic control system, but cost overruns, software problems and management concerns are making some wonder whether the so-called "Next Generation" system may take another generation to complete.

The radar screens in the nation's aircraft control towers are based on technology dating to World War II. Many of the routes airliners fly were laid out at a time pilots followed bonfires for navigation at night.

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4:57am

Sat October 15, 2011
Music Interviews

A Grand Musical Thinker, Inviting 'Friendly Experiencers'

Anthony Braxton has just released the recording of his fifth opera, Trillium E.

Michael Weintrob Tri-Centric Foundation

The rap on composer and multi-instrumentalist Anthony Braxton has always been that his music is difficult.

But Braxton himself is far from austere. He's easily approachable, so much so that he uses the term "friendly experiencer" to describe his audience.

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4:36am

Sat October 15, 2011
Middle East

WikiLeaks Cable Hints At Motive For Alleged Iran Plot

Originally published on Sun October 16, 2011 6:23 am

An alleged Iranian plot to assassinate Saudi Arabia's ambassador to the U.S., Adel al-Jubeir (shown here in 2004), may have been motivated by tensions between Iran and Saudi Arabia, but also could underscore an internal power struggle.

Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

The disclosure of an alleged Iranian plot to kill the Saudi ambassador in the U.S. is certain to worsen relations between Riyadh and Tehran, despite the baffling and improbable details that have emerged so far.

Relations between Iran and Saudi Arabia have been deteriorating for some years now, however, with growing hostility bubbling just below the surface. In that context, the plot may make more sense than is immediately apparent.

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4:24am

Sat October 15, 2011
Politics

The Binge-Purge Politics Of 2012

Originally published on Sun October 16, 2011 1:39 am

Rep. Michele Bachmann greets supporters after Tuesday's debate in New Hampshire. She saw her political fortunes rise earlier in the summer but has since fallen back in the polls.

Jim Cole AP

In the days following the umpteenth Republican presidential debate — Tuesday night in New Hampshire — America continues to ladle praise on its newfound hero: pizza mogul Herman Cain.

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3:37am

Sat October 15, 2011
Presidential Race

The Difference, Herman Cain Says, Is 'Substance'

An NBC/Wall Street Journal poll out this week puts a new name at the top of the race for the Republican presidential nomination: Herman Cain. The poll shows the former head of Godfather's Pizza at 27 percent, with former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney just 4 points behind. Cain spoke with Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon about his surge to front-runner status.

Scott Simon: So how do you keep your campaign from going the way of Mitt Romney, Rick Perry, Michele Bachmann, Donald Trump — for that matter, every other front-runner?

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3:02am

Sat October 15, 2011
Sports

Being Bartman: 'Catching Hell' Tells Cubs Fan's Story

As the Chicago Cubs' Moises Alou made a leaping attempt at a pop foul during the National League Championship Series, Steve Bartman (in Cubs cap and dark sweater) was among the fans reaching for the ball. While one image suggests he acted alone, the second photo tells another story.

Elsa Getty Images

We fans of the Chicago Cubs rarely hear good news in October, so there's a little buzz of excitement around Wrigley Field these days about the possibility of Boston Red Sox GM Theo Epstein reportedly coming to Chicago to take over a similar or expanded role with the hapless Cubs.

In 2004, Epstein helped guide the Red Sox to their first World Series title in 86 years and to another title in 2007. In Chicago, he'd be trying to end a Cubs' championship drought dating back to 1908; the Cubs haven't even been to the World Series since 1945.

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12:19am

Sat October 15, 2011
Business

Obama Drives Home Free Trade Deal With S. Korea

Originally published on Sat October 15, 2011 11:26 am

President Obama waves to the crowd after speaking at a GM plant Friday in Michigan. Obama and South Korean President Lee Myung-bak visited the plant to promote a free trade agreement.

Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Over the last few years, during factory tours across the country, Obama has driven an electric vehicle and coerced a New York Times reporter aboard a high-tech scooter.

So it was a safe bet that when he and South Korean President Lee Myung-bak found a brand new subcompact Chevy Sonic car on their tour of a General Motors plant, the two world leaders would climb in.

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6:01pm

Fri October 14, 2011
Environment

Polar Bear Researcher To Be Re-Interviewed By Feds

A researcher who wrote a famous report about dead polar bears is being re-interviewed by federal investigators, who are continuing to probe allegations of misconduct. Above, a polar bear walks on the frozen tundra on the edge of Hudson Bay.

Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Federal officials continue to probe allegations of misconduct related to a famous report on dead polar bears that raised concerns about climate change. Later this month, officials plan to re-interview one of the two government scientists who wrote that report.

The new development suggests that scientific integrity remains a focus of the investigation, which recently detoured into allegations that the other researcher under scrutiny broke rules related to federal funding of research. Both scientists work for agencies of the Department of the Interior (DOI).

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5:50pm

Fri October 14, 2011
The Two-Way

NASA Books Flight On Virgin Galactic

Originally published on Fri October 14, 2011 6:49 pm

SpaceShipTwo in full feather wing mode on a rapid descent from its drop altitude of 51,500 feet over Mojave, Calif. in May of 2011. This photograph was taken with high powered telescopes from the ground.

Mark Greenberg Virgin Galactic/Clay Center Obse

Virgin Galactic announced today that NASA has booked its first charter flight to space on the company's SpaceShipTwo, which the company says will take off from its New Mexico spaceport.

The contract could be worth up to $4.5 million if NASA exercises its right to book two more flights. Virgin said NASA will use its flight on the spacecraft for "engineers, technologists, and scientific researchers to conduct cutting-edge experiments in space."

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5:46pm

Fri October 14, 2011
Music Interviews

Evanescence: Thrashing Guitars, Angelic Vocals

Evanescence's self-titled third album is out this week.

Courtesy of the artist

Goth metal has always been a niche genre, but over the years, a few artists have found ways to give it Top 40 appeal. Evanescence has pulled off that trick with two multiplatinum albums: Fallen in 2004 and The Open Door in 2006, both of which unite loud, heavy guitars and drums with the ethereal voice of singer Amy Lee.

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5:42pm

Fri October 14, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Administration Drops Long-Term Care Provision Of Overhaul

Originally published on Sat October 15, 2011 11:52 am

The late Sen. Edward Kennedy, a champion for the CLASS Act, gets a standing ovation as he arrives at the closing session of a White House forum on health care overhaul in early March 2009.

Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

After a 19-month review, the Obama administration has concluded that it can't implement the CLASS Act, the community-based long-term care program that was the late Sen. Edward Kennedy's most heartfelt contribution to the Affordable Care Act.

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5:41pm

Fri October 14, 2011
Politics

Voters In Spartanburg, S.C., Say They Favor Cain

Originally published on Fri October 14, 2011 7:28 pm

Members of the Palmetto Statesmen, a barbershop chorus, say they think the Republican Party has lost its way. Currently, many say they favor candidate Herman Cain.

Melissa Block NPR

One of the earliest primary states is South Carolina, which holds its primary on Jan. 21. South Carolina is a Republican stronghold — with a strongly conservative voting base.

In Spartanburg, S.C., a handful of Republican voters share what's on their minds — and many are leaning toward Herman Cain.

Perry Aims To Win Voters

Texas Gov. Rick Perry is trying to win hearts and minds in the Palmetto State right where it counts — with food.

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4:46pm

Fri October 14, 2011
Religion

Bishop Indicted For Not Reporting Suspected Abuse

A grand jury has indicted the Roman Catholic bishop of Kansas City for failing to report suspected child sexual abuse. Bishop Robert Finn has pleaded not guilty to a misdemeanor count of not reporting to police that a priest had child pornography on his computer.

4:46pm

Fri October 14, 2011
World

U.S. Sends Troops To Uganda

President Obama told Congress he is sending troops to Uganda and neighboring country. The numbers aren't big: About a hundred American military advisers are going. But they have a significant job. They're tasked with helping African troops pursue members of the Lord's Resistance Army. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Michele Kelemen for more.

4:22pm

Fri October 14, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

What Twitter Knows About Flu

Flu shots, anyone?

Giorgio Magini iStockphoto.com

Twitter may turn out to be a great tool for tracking epidemics and how people deal with them.

Some scientists tracked tweets about swine flu back in 2009 and 2010, then looked at how the tweets lined up with vaccination rates.

By comparing the Twitter data with vaccination estimates from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, the group saw patterns between what people were saying about flu shots and whether or not they were getting sick.

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4:11pm

Fri October 14, 2011
Movies

Remakes Rethink: Is Hollywood Really Out Of Ideas?

Holding out for ... what again? A remake of 1984's Footloose (with Kevin Bacon) has some fans crying foul — but if Aretha Franklin can earn respect with an Otis Redding song, why can't Hollywood take a second look at something?

The Kobal Collection Picture Desk

It's been a big year for Hollywood remakes — more than a dozen, not counting sequels. There were new versions of Conan the Barbarian and Arthur this summer. Fresh incarnations of Footloose and The Thing open today. And soon we'll see Hollywood's take on the Swedish hit The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. Cue the standard complaint: Hollywood has run out of ideas.

Hold on, though. Let's think this through.

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