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12:00pm

Wed October 12, 2011
Technology

India's $35 Tablet To Bridge The Digital Divide?

The Indian government recently launched the world's cheapest tablet computer, which will be sold to students at a subsidized price. Michel Martin speaks with Columbia University Digital Media Professor Sree Sreenivasan about whether the world's largest democracy — with more than half its population living below the poverty line — can bridge the digital divide.

12:00pm

Wed October 12, 2011
Author Interviews

Helping Marriages Go The Distance

The new book, 'I Do ... Every Day: Words of Wisdom for Newlyweds, and Not So Newlyweds' offers common sense advice and surprising tips for maintaining healthy marriages. Journalist Cynthia Bond Hopson and Reverend Roger Hopson write from experience — they've been happily married for 35 years, with two children and four grandchildren. They speak with host Michel Martin about their book, marriage and advice for couples.

12:00pm

Wed October 12, 2011
Music

When Electronica Meets Folk ... A Dance Craze

Tell Me More's celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month and the music of Latin America wraps up this week. The hosts of NPR's Alt. Latino podcast, Jasmine Garsd and Felix Contreras, talk about the unusual mix of electronica and folk. They listen to these blended tracks and styles from Colombia and Argentina.

12:00pm

Wed October 12, 2011
Race

Debunking Black Marriage Myths

A recent article in Empower magazine says that media and popular opinion are too pessimistic when analyzing the success of black couples. Ivory Toldson, a senior research analyst for the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, says he crunched the numbers and found fallacies in the negative stereotypes associated with black courtship and marriage. He speaks with Michel Martin.

11:55am

Wed October 12, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Financial Conflicts 'Pervasive' On Key Medical Panels

Financial conflicts abound on medical panels that set practice guidelines.

Ricardo Reitmeyer iStockphoto.com

Like it or not, there's a seeming inexorable movement in medicine toward guidelines to help the average doctor deliver care that's in line with the latest evidence.

Somebody has to come up with those guidelines. Somebodies, actually, and they usually are experts who sit on panels charged with the task of boiling down the evidence.

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11:36am

Wed October 12, 2011
Around the Nation

Out And Proud After 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' Repeal

a collection of stories from other gay military members.

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1st Lt. Josh Seefried is the author and editor of a new anthology, Our Time: Breaking The Silence of "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," a collection of stories from other gay military members.

Courtesy of Josh Seefried

The "Don't ask, don't tell" policy was still in effect when Air Force 1st Lt. Josh Seefried helped start secret Facebook groups to connect active-duty gay and lesbian soldiers with each other online. Lieutenant Seefried also wrote for many publications — under the pseudonym J.D. Smith — about what it was like to be gay and an active-duty member of the military.

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11:31am

Wed October 12, 2011
Science

How Crossword Puzzles Unlocked An Artist's Memory

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Language drives Johnson's art since her illness, as depicted in her piece called "Enthusiastic," created in 2009.

Courtesy of Walters Art Museum

It's not often you see an image of a brain scan on the wall of an art exhibit. But among works by Monet and Sisley at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore hangs just that — a cross-section of a human brain. It belongs to artist Lonni Sue Johnson.

The room is really two exhibits — the art Johnson created before she contracted viral encephalitis in 2007, which destroyed her hippocampus and parts of her left temporal lobe — and her work after.

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11:03am

Wed October 12, 2011
The Two-Way

Rep. Issa Sends 'Fast And Furious' Subpoenas To Holder, Other Officials

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 2:53 pm

Saying "it's time we know the whole truth" about the so-called Fast and Furious gun trafficking operation, the chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee today followed through on his promise to issue subpoenas to Attorney General Eric Holder and other high-ranking Justice Department officials.

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10:34am

Wed October 12, 2011
The Impact of War

Rebuilding Wounded Soldiers When They Return

David Wood is the senior military correspondent for The Huffington Post. He was previously a staff correspondent for Time Magazine, The Los Angeles Times, and The Baltimore Sun.

courtesy of David Wood

Better medical care and equipment means fewer troops are dying on the battlefield. But more troops are coming home severely wounded, with injuries that require lifelong care and cost millions of dollars in medical costs.

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10:29am

Wed October 12, 2011
The Salt

Supply, Labor, Money Keys To Getting More Local Food Into Schools

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 10:48 am

The money is only part of the challenge facing school lunch programs who want to expand contracts with local farms.

iStockphoto.com

When it comes to meeting the goal of getting more local food into school lunch, a major challenge has always been finding the money. Thanks to the new school lunch law, more federal grants than ever are available.

But the problem is bigger than money. It takes a serious supply chain and dedicated labor to make it work, too.

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10:26am

Wed October 12, 2011
It's All Politics

Fact-Checking The GOP Debate: What Candidates Said About The Economy

PolitiFact

In an interview for Wednesday's Morning Edition, Bill Adair, editor of PolitiFact.com and Washington bureau chief for the St. Petersburg Times, talked with NPR's Steve Inskeep about how candidates at Tuesday night's GOP debate rated on PolitiFact's Truth-O-Meter.

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10:23am

Wed October 12, 2011
The Two-Way

'Underwear Bomber' Pleads Guilty

Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab is this hour pleading guilty to attempting to blow up a Detroit-bound passenger jet on Christmas Day 2009.

The Detroit Free Press, which is live-blogging the court action, reports that attorney Anthony Chambers surprised the courtroom earlier by announcing that "his client plans to plead guilty." And it adds that:

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10:10am

Wed October 12, 2011
It's All Politics

Debate Does Nothing To Derail Romney's 'Kudzu Campaign'

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 4:23 pm

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney maintained his frontrunner status in the GOP presidential debate at Dartmouth College on Tuesday.

Justin Sullivan Getty Images

10:09am

Wed October 12, 2011
The Two-Way

Israel, Hamas Prisoner-Swap Deal: The Ripple Effects

What does the deal reached by Israel and Hamas to exchange long-held Sgt. Gilad Schalit for about 1,000 Palestinian prisoners mean for the seemingly never-ending Mideast peace process and politics in the region?

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9:00am

Wed October 12, 2011

8:30am

Wed October 12, 2011
The Two-Way

BlackBerry Outages Continue, Reports Say They've Spread To North America

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 5:14 pm

Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

7:59am

Wed October 12, 2011
The Two-Way

Top Stories: Terror Plot, Baghdad Bombings, Republican Debate

Good morning.

Our early headline today was a follow to the news about an alleged plan by two Iranians to kill Saudi Arabia's ambassador to the U.S.:

Alleged Terror Plot: 'Brazen And Bizarre'

As for other stories making headlines (and we'll have more about some of them later), they include:

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7:30am

Wed October 12, 2011
The Two-Way

Alleged Terror Plot: 'Brazen And Bizarre'

This courtroom drawing shows Manssor Arbabsiar (front, right), appearing before U.S. Southern District Court Judge Michael H. Dolinger on Tuesday.

Shirley Shepard AFP/Getty Images

Two words — brazen and bizarre — come to mind about the alleged plot by two Iranians to hire members of a Mexican drug cartel to kill the Saudi ambassador to the U.S. and possibly bomb the Saudi and Israeli embassies in Washington, NPR's Tom Gjelten said earlier today on Morning Edition.

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6:59am

Wed October 12, 2011
Around the Nation

Corn Maze Baffles Family Of Four

Bob Connors tells the Boston Globe he designed the seven-acre maze in Danvers, Mass., so people would get lost. Apparently it worked because a family of four became completely disoriented. In a final act of desperation, they called 911 from inside the maze.

6:56am

Wed October 12, 2011
History

World's Oldest Running Car Sells For $4.5 Million

In 1887, the French-made motor car La Marquise was in the first automobile race. It is still running. The car got a standing ovation when it was driven onstage at a recent auction, and a winning bid of more than $4.5 million.

4:00am

Wed October 12, 2011
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 8:24 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's remember, now, a pioneer for gay rights. Yesterday, on National Coming Out Day, Frank Kameny died.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Mr. Kameny fought in World War II. He earned a PhD from Harvard. He landed a job with the U.S. Army Map Service. And then, in 1957, he was fired for being gay. Frank Kameny sued, and lost, and appealed, and lost. But this was still a landmark case. It was the first federal civil rights claim based on sexual orientation. He also organized a group called the Homophiles.

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4:00am

Wed October 12, 2011
NPR Story

Fact Checking: Latest GOP Debate

Steve Inskeep and Bill Adair, editor of the non-partisan fact-checking web site Politifact.com, truth squad the latest Republican presidential debate held last night in Hanover, New Hampshire.

4:00am

Wed October 12, 2011
NPR Story

Does Dexia's Collapse Herald A Wider Banking Crisis?

Until now, the eurozone debt crisis has been confined to countries on the continent's periphery — like Greece, Spain and Ireland. But that may be changing with the collapse of a bank at the core of the eurozone. While some call Franco-Belgian lender Dexia's demise an exception, others say it is a wake-up call for all European banks.

4:00am

Wed October 12, 2011
NPR Story

U.S.: Iran Behind Plot To Kill Saudi Envoy

Steve Inskeep talks with Iran expert Ray Takeyh of the Council on Foreign Relations about the criminal charges filed yesterday against two Iranians — one a naturalized U.S. citizen — accused of plotting to kill the Saudi Ambassador to Washington.

4:00am

Wed October 12, 2011
NPR Story

Economic Progress Lags For U.S. Born Children Of Mexican Immigrants

Since the last decade, there are now more Hispanic children of immigrants in the United States than actual immigrants. That should translate into more progress — educationally and economically. But Steve Trejo, an economist at the University of Texas at Austin, tells Renee Montagne that while the second generation does better than the first, the third generation doesn't fare as well.

4:00am

Wed October 12, 2011
Middle East

Hamas, Israel Reach Deal To Swap Prisoners

The Israeli government and the Palestinian militant group Hamas have agreed to a prisoner exchange. Hamas says Israel will free more than 1,000 Palestinian prisoners in exchange for Gilad Schalit, the Israeli soldier captured by Hamas militants and held in Gaza for more than five years.

2:32am

Wed October 12, 2011
Africa

Famine-Stricken Somalia Suffers From Aid Drought

Humanitarian groups are increasingly worried about the looming budget cuts in U.S. foreign assistance. They argue that lives are at stake, literally, in places like the Horn of Africa, which is suffering its worst drought in decades.

Raising public and private money for that has been a challenge in the current economic environment.

Hollywood stars and politicians have resorted to using the F word — in this case Famine — to get the attention of Americans about the humanitarian emergency in Somalia.

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12:01am

Wed October 12, 2011
Middle East

Syrian Refugees In Turkey Call For International Help

Syrian refugees gather for a protest against Syrian President Bashar Assad at the Turkish Red Crescent camp in the Yayladagi district of the Turkish city of Hatay near the Syrian border, June 20, 2011. More than 7,000 Syrians are living in camps in Turkey.

Mustafa Ozer AFP/Getty Images

As political unrest and a government crackdown in Syria continue to simmer, more than 7,500 Syrian refugees have fled to camps in southeastern Turkey, and Syrians say many more would come if they could get past the Syrian army.

One of these camps, Altinozu, lies deep in the farm fields of Turkey's Hatay province. It appears to be well-planned and well-run, right down to the asphalt laid between the rows of white tents.

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12:01am

Wed October 12, 2011
2 Languages, Many Voices: Latinos In The U.S.

Immigrant Parents Rely On Kids For Help Online

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A pamphlet in Spanish for Cingular phone rate information is displayed in a Cingular store in Elmhurst, Illinois. Cingular announced in 2006 that it was converting 420 of their stores to "a bilingual concept," with both English and Spanish phone information, payment options and bilingual staff members.

Tim Boyle Getty Images

On a weekend in East L.A., kids do what they do anywhere else — play games, hang out in restaurants. But in this immigrant neighborhood, many of them have grown-up responsibilities. Fifteen-year-old Gonzalo Cruz says his parents depend on him for help online.

"When they need to look up a place, like a doctor's appointment, I show them," Cruz says. "Computers right now, in our country, they're just English. You have to use them a certain way, and they didn't learn to do that when they were little."

Thirteen year-old Cassandra Flores helps her parents pay bills online.

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12:01am

Wed October 12, 2011
Research News

Pain At The Plate: Heat Increases Pitcher Retaliation

Originally published on Wed October 12, 2011 2:54 pm

Adrian Beltre of the Texas Rangers is hit by a pitch from the Tampa Bay Rays' James Shields on Oct. 1 at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, Texas.

Tom Pennington Getty Images

Richard Larrick has been bothered by something for two decades.

"Twenty years ago, I'd done a paper with some graduate students just showing that in hotter temperatures, pitchers are more likely to hit batters with pitches," says Larrick, a professor at the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University.

Was it because they would sweat more, and the ball might get slippery and hard to control? Or was it something intentional?

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