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4:00pm

Mon December 5, 2011
The Record

Howard Tate, Soul Singer, Dies At 72

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 7:22 pm

Howard Tate, circa 1970.
Michael Ochs Courtesy of the artist.

Soul music lost one of its great voices last week. Singer Howard Tate died Friday after a battle with cancer at the age of 72. Tate had made his name with a string of classic records including "Get It While You Can," before sliding into obscurity and addiction. But Tate got sober, found religion and he enjoyed a successful encore career over the past decade.

Tate's first turn at the music business came in 1966, when the single "Ain't Nobody Home" hit the R&B charts.

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3:13pm

Mon December 5, 2011
The Two-Way

Happy Holidays: Stories Of Crime And Redemption

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 3:21 pm

The missing Santa and penguins as seen on McClaren's reward poster.
Jason McClaren via Herald Times

We don't usually share local crime stories, but two of them stuck out today. And one of them provides some hope. We'll start with the sad one:

Fox 8 Cleveland reports that a burglar has "ruined" Christmas for a Painesville, Ohio family. The burglar allegedly broke into the home, took their TV, an Xbox, a laptop and worst of all perhaps, then took all the newly-bought presents underneath the Christmas tree:

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3:12pm

Mon December 5, 2011
Afghanistan

Angry Pakistan Boycotts Meeting On Afghanistan

Pakistani students protest the cross-border NATO air strike on Pakistani troops, in a march at the U.S. consulate in Karachi, Dec. 2. Pakistan said it could not attend the Bonn conference on Afghanistan unless its security was ensured.
Rizwan Tabssum AFP/Getty Images

The United States and dozens of other countries convened in Bonn, Germany, Monday to discuss Afghanistan's future. But Pakistan, a key player in any Afghan settlement, boycotted the conference.

Pakistani leaders were deeply angered by the killing of 24 of their soldiers in a NATO airstrike along the Afghan border last month.

Many in Pakistan say relations between the United States and Pakistan have never been worse, though there may be signs of a coming thaw.

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3:06pm

Mon December 5, 2011
Europe

Russian Voters Send Putin A Message

A Russian woman votes Sunday at a mobile ballot box in the western village of Shelomets. Prime Minister Vladimir Putin's United Russia party received around half the vote and will control the next parliament, but its majority was significantly reduced.
Viktor Drachev AFP/Getty Images

After 12 years with his authority virtually unchallenged, Vladimir Putin now appears to be facing an electorate that's showing signs of weariness with his rule.

Putin still seems to have a lock on another presidential term as the country prepares for that election in March. Nevertheless, his party – United Russia – received a clear rebuke in parliamentary elections held Sunday.

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3:00pm

Mon December 5, 2011
Around the Nation

Wis. To Require Permits For Protests In Capitol

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

New rules set to go into effect later this month could make it harder to stage demonstrations at Wisconsin's state capitol. The move comes after thousands gathered there earlier this year to protest a new law curbing the power of public employee unions. Governor Scott Walker has issued guidelines that limit the size of crowds both inside and outside the capitol building. Demonstrators would also be responsible for the costs of cleanup and police security.

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3:00pm

Mon December 5, 2011
Asia

In Russia, Protesters Take To The Streets

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 7:22 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Thousands of protestors took to the streets tonight in Moscow. They accused the party of Prime Minister Vladimir Putin of stealing votes in Russia's parliamentary elections. The party United Russia won 50 percent of the vote. That's significantly less than it has in the past and less than the party was expected to win this time around. Still, independent monitors and the protestors say the vote was rigged.

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2:20pm

Mon December 5, 2011
The Two-Way

FAA Administrator Charged With DWI

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 2:28 pm

The head of the Federal Aviation Administration, who among other duties is in charge of the nation's air traffic controllers, was charged with driving while intoxicated Saturday night in Fairfax, Va., a suburb of Washington, D.C.

And Federal News Radio says Jerome "Randy" Babbitt has now been "placed on a leave of absence." The Associated Press reports that the leave was "at Babbitt's request."

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2:18pm

Mon December 5, 2011
Books

John Lithgow's On-Stage 'Education'

Originally published on Tue December 6, 2011 1:45 pm

Provided by the publisher

John Lithgow was born into a theater family, but he never intended to become an actor; he wanted to paint. But ever since he first took the stage as a toddler, he was a hit — and he's gone on to win numerous awards for his work in television, theater and film.

In his memoir, Drama: An Actor's Education, Lithgow focuses on the years before the fame — from his stage debut at the age of 2 and his college years at Harvard, right up to the moment when he moved out West and became a star.

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1:50pm

Mon December 5, 2011
The Two-Way

Crippled Japanese Nuclear Plant Continues To Leak Radioactive Water

This handout picture, taken by Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) shows radioactive water on the floor inside the building of a water treatment facility at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.
TEPCO AFP/Getty Images

Over the weekend, the company that runs the Japanese nuclear plant crippled by the earthquake and tsunami in March said they had detected another leak of radioactive water. This time, Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Tepco) said, 45 tons of contaminated water had been found outside the cooling system and about 300 liters of it had leaked into the Pacific Ocean.

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1:47pm

Mon December 5, 2011
Education

A Carrot for College Performance: More Money

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 7:22 pm

This year, Tennessee Tech's $35 million in state funding will go up or down based solely on whether students are succeeding.
By Brian Stansberry Wikimedia Commons

For a long time, most public colleges and universities have gotten their funding based on how many students they enroll: More students mean more money.

But economic pressures have convinced states they should only reward results that help students — and the state's economy.

Tennessee is a leader among states trying to peg funding to the number of students who actually graduate.

Getting Education To Do More For The State

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1:27pm

Mon December 5, 2011
Newt Gingrich

Gingrich's Health Care Consultancy: Is It Lobbying?

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 7:27 pm

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, shown at an event on health care on Capitol Hill this March, founded the Center for Health Transformation.
Brendan Hoffman Getty Images

In between his speakership and his presidential candidacy, Newt Gingrich built a network of organizations to promote his causes — and himself.

Informally known as Newt Gingrich Inc., those entities have flourished. But questions linger, especially about two of them: the Gingrich Group, a for-profit consulting firm; and a unit of the Gingrich Group called the Center for Health Transformation.

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1:21pm

Mon December 5, 2011
Humans

For Creative People, Cheating Comes More Easily

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 7:22 pm

New research suggests that people who are more creative are more likely to cheat.
iStockphoto.com

Five months after the implosion of Enron, Feb. 12, 2002, the company's chief executive, Ken Lay, finally stood in front of Congress and the world, and placed his hand on a Bible.

At that point everyone had questions for Lay. It was clear by then that Enron was the product of a spectacular ethical failure, that there had been massive cheating and lying. The real question was: How many people had been dishonest? Who was in on it?

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1:08pm

Mon December 5, 2011
The Two-Way

Queen Elizabeth's 'Pay' Has Been Frozen

Queen Elizabeth II in November.
Cris Jackson/pool AFP/Getty Images

She'll still get about $50 million a year in taxpayers' money to run her palaces and travel the world, but there's word from the U.K. that Queen Elizabeth II has had her "pay" frozen until at least 2015.

Hard times, after all, require sacrifices.

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1:00pm

Mon December 5, 2011
World

Limited Options to De-Escalate Violence In Syria

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 3:28 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Over the weekend, as the number killed rose over 4,000, one U.N. official took the considered step of describing the situation in Syria as a civil war. While much of the opposition to the government of Bashar al-Assad remains peaceful, defectors from the military have taken up arms, neighborhoods have formed ad-hoc militias, political and military opposition groups have established a presence across the border in Turkey.

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1:00pm

Mon December 5, 2011
Politics

What Cain's Exit Means For The Republican Field

Herman Cain quit the presidential primary over the weekend and an Atlanta TV station reports that he may endorse his former rival, Newt Gingrich. NPR's Ken Rudin talks about Cain's decision to quit, and how it will change the primary field.

1:00pm

Mon December 5, 2011
Education

Hrabowski Works To Narrow The Achievement Gap

When Freeman Hrabowski became president of The University of Maryland, Baltimore County in 1992, he made it his mission to close the achievement gap. UMBC now sends more African-African students to graduate school in science and technology than any other predominantly white university in the U.S.

1:00pm

Mon December 5, 2011
Opinion

Op-Ed: Treating Families That Don't Immunize

Many doctors complain that the few patients who refuse immunizations put all patients at risk, and some refuse them treatment. New York Times Ethicist Ariel Kaminer addresses the question of whether it's ethical for pediatricians to refuse routine care to families with unvaccinated children.

12:47pm

Mon December 5, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Teens Aren't the Rampant Sexting Maniacs We Thought

They're probably just texting their moms.
Mark Rose iStockphoto.com

Teens sharing totally inappropriate naked photos on their phones: Sexting sounded so plausible, it just had to be true.

But now it turns out that's the vast majority of teenagers aren't sexting at all.

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12:37pm

Mon December 5, 2011
The Two-Way

Who Are The 1 Percent? Gallup Finds They're A Lot Like The 99 Percent

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 12:42 pm

A protestor carries a sign as she marches down Market Street during a day of action in support of the Occupy Wall Street movement on Dec. 2 in San Francisco.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

The Occupy movement has refocused the national conversation to income inequality. As we've reported in the past, this Tumbler blog puts a face on who the 99 percent are.

But who are the 1 percent?

Today, Gallup released analysis that looked at households who earned more than $500,000 annually and found that in many cases they were a "mirror image" of the 99 percent.

Among the findings:

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12:34pm

Mon December 5, 2011
Around the Nation

Drone Technology Finding Its Way To American Skies

A Predator drone unmanned aerial vehicle takes off on a U.S. Customs Border Protection mission from Fort Huachuca, Ariz.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Unmanned aircraft — or drones — are playing a large role in U.S. military operations in Afghanistan but they're starting to show up in increasing numbers in U.S. as well. Drones are already used to patrol the border with Mexico and now they may soon be coming to a police department near you.

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12:06pm

Mon December 5, 2011
Can I Just Tell You?

Wanted: Advice For Recent Grad In Tough Economy

Many recent graduates are struggling to find their way through today's tough economic landscape.
iStockphoto.com

I'd like to tell you about an email I've been carrying around for a month now. It is from a young man whom I know, a fairly recent college graduate. He was writing in response to a column I wrote a while back that argued that the discussions about who is rich and who isn't struck me as disingenuous, given just how it is that some people get to six figures these days — including a police officer married to a nurse. And I said that slicing the onion that way doesn't begin to address the kind of staggering inequality and sense of unfairness that so many people feel these days.

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12:05pm

Mon December 5, 2011
The Salt

How Hot Chocolate Became More American Than Apple Pie

A Mars Inc. employee demonstrates how cacao beans are ground into cocoa powder at a chocolate-making demonstration at the National Archives.
Melissa Forsyth NPR

As the temperature starts to drop, it may be comforting to know that hot chocolate could be more American than apple pie.

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12:00pm

Mon December 5, 2011
World

The Future Of Women's Rights In Afghanistan

More than 80 countries are convening in Germany on Monday to discuss Afghanistan as international troops prepare to withdraw in 2014. Fariba Nawa has documented the devastating effects of the opium trade on Afghanistan — her home country. She speaks with host Michel Martin about the conference and her hopes and fears for Afghanistan's future.

12:00pm

Mon December 5, 2011
Books

In 'Salvage The Bones,' Family's Story Of Survival

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Sometimes, the stories of life's biggest triumphs and tragedies are best told, not in the headlines or in a cable news crawl, but in literature. In her novel, "Salvage the Bones," Jesmyn Ward tells the story of how one family on the Mississippi Gulf Coast endured Hurricane Katrina.

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12:00pm

Mon December 5, 2011
Around the Nation

Illegal Farm Worker Becomes Brain Surgeon

Dr. Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa picked tomatoes, shoveled sulfur and scraped fish lard before becoming one of America's most respected neurosurgeons.
Keith Weller

Immigration continues to spark intense and emotional political debates between people who favor expansive immigration policies and those who want more restrictions.

But what is often left out of the conversation is the experience of being in the middle space — between being legal and illegal. All this week Tell Me More will focus on those in that position (or who is related to someone who is) in a series titled "In Limbo."

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12:00pm

Mon December 5, 2011
Your Money

All I Want For Christmas: Less Debt?

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 11:43 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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11:43am

Mon December 5, 2011
Fine Art

At MoMA, A Look At De Kooning's Shifts In Style

Woman I (1950-52) is one of the works featured in de Kooning: A Retrospective. The exhibit is on display at the Museum of Modern Art through Jan. 9, 2012.
John Wronn Museum of Modern Art

In 2010, the Museum of Modern Art was criticized for its skimpy representation of the Dutch-American painter Willem de Kooning in its huge abstract expressionist show. The museum has now made up for that with an astounding de Kooning retrospective, the first of its kind: some 200 paintings, drawings, prints and sculptures that trace de Kooning's career beginning at age 12, when he was working for a graphic designer in his native Rotterdam and painting remarkable imitations of Cezanne, Picasso, Matisse, Miro and Gorky.

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11:34am

Mon December 5, 2011
Author Interviews

'Times' Advice Guru Answers Your Social Q's

When you're out with friends, put your cell phone away, advises New York Times advice columnist Philip Galanes.
iStockphoto.com

Need advice on when it's appropriate to break up with someone over email? Want to know how to react if your dinner companion whips out a cellphone midway through a meal? What about how to deal with your annoying relatives during the holidays?

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11:17am

Mon December 5, 2011
The Two-Way

Post Office Lays Out More Details On Service Changes, Closings

Originally published on Mon December 5, 2011 2:30 pm

Scott Schechter, a United States Postal Service employee, collected mail from the boxes in front of a mail processing center on Sept. 16, 2011 in Pembroke Pines, Fla.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Dropping a first-class letter in the mail in the morning and expecting it will get to its destination by the next day would be a thing of the past under changes the U.S. Postal Service is detailing this hour.

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8:53am

Mon December 5, 2011

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