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3:45pm

Tue November 29, 2011
Middle East

Report Says Syrian Forces Have Killed 256 Children

Syrian has come under increasing international pressure in recent days. On Monday, Syrians protested in the capital Damascus against the Arab League's decision to impose sanctions. Syria has also come under sharp criticism from an independent commission that accused the security forces of systematically carrying out abuses against anti-government demonstrators.
Yin Bogu Xinhua /Landov

An independent commission has released a blistering human rights report that says Syria's security forces have carried out widespread abuses against protesters, including murder and torture.

The commission, appointed by the U.N.'s Human Rights Council, based its report on interviews with more than 220 witnesses or victims of abuse by Syrian security forces. The panel says it collected a solid body of evidence and identified patterns of human rights violations.

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3:23pm

Tue November 29, 2011
NPR's Back Seat Book Club

Kids' Book Club Takes 'Tollbooth' To Lands Beyond

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:14 am

Welcome to the second installment of NPR's Backseat Book Club! Every month, we invite kids to read a book along with us, and then send in their questions for the author.

Our book club selection for November is a classic that's celebrating a big anniversary. The Phantom Tollbooth — written by Norton Juster and illustrated by Jules Feiffer — was published 50 years ago. Juster tells NPR's Michele Norris that the story sprang from his own childhood.

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3:00pm

Tue November 29, 2011
The Two-Way

Book Award Winner's Tale Echoes Those Told By Other Vietnamese Refugees

Thanhha Lai.
Courtesy of Harper Collins

Thanhha Lai was 10 years old the day in 1975 that North Vietnamese tanks crashed through the gates of the presidential palace in Saigon and fear spread through the city on rumors that Communist troops were about to begin a massacre. Lai recalls fleeing with her eight older siblings and her mother to the nearby port and boarding a crowded South Vietnamese Navy ship that then headed to sea.

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3:00pm

Tue November 29, 2011
NPR Story

Stern Predicts Outcomes Of Climate Talks

Originally published on Tue November 29, 2011 7:38 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Joining us now to talk about what the U.S. hopes to accomplish at the UN climate talks in Durban is the chief negotiator for the United States, Todd Stern. He's been negotiating on behalf of the U.S. off and on since the Kyoto Protocol was first forged back in 1997. Todd Stern, welcome to the program.

TODD STERN: Thanks very much, Guy. Happy to be here.

RAZ: As we just heard, the expectations are pretty low for a treaty that limits emissions coming out of Durban. What needs to happen at Durban for you to consider it a success?

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3:00pm

Tue November 29, 2011
Presidential Race

Cain Reassess His Presidential Campaign

A day after denying an Atlanta woman's claim that she had shared a 13-year affair with him, Republican presidential hopeful Herman Cain said during a morning conference call that he is "reassessing" his candidacy.

2:59pm

Tue November 29, 2011
Hard Times: A Journey Across America

Hard Times Inspire Ky. College Students To Action

Originally published on Tue November 29, 2011 8:22 pm

Sophomore Emily Nugent is among Berea College's 1,600 students who receive free tuition. On average, Berea's students come from families with household incomes of about $25,000.
Noah Adams NPR

Part of a monthlong series

NPR's Hard Times series features stories of economic hardship and also stories of hope. We asked for ideas from listeners, and Emily Nugent of Berea College in Kentucky responded, writing: "With a student body composed entirely of students from low socio-economic backgrounds, Berea students know about the challenges Americans are facing." Noah Adams went in search of Emily and the Berea College story.

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2:51pm

Tue November 29, 2011
Environment

What Will Become Of The Kyoto Climate Treaty?

Originally published on Sat December 3, 2011 2:45 pm

Key provisions of the Kyoto Protocol expire in December of 2012, and experts say there's no real global framework in place to replace the treaty that was supposed to be the first step toward ambitious actions on climate change. Above, a coal-fired power plant in eastern China. China is now the leading carbon dioxide emitter in the world.
AFP/Getty Images

As diplomats from around the world gather in Durban, South Africa, for talks about climate change, a big question looms: What will become of the Kyoto climate treaty, which was negotiated with much fanfare in 1997. The treaty was supposed to be a first step toward much more ambitious actions on climate change, but it is now on the brink of fading into irrelevance. That could have major implications for the future of United Nations climate talks.

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2:49pm

Tue November 29, 2011
The Two-Way

Accident Spill, Or How 'You Set Out With Marmite And End Up With A Jam'

Michele Kayal for NPR

Twitter already beat us to all the good puns, including the one in the headline. But, yes, it is true, you will either love or hate this news story from England: A tanker carrying 20 tons of yeast extract — the main ingredient in the loved-or-reviled Marmite — was involved in a late night accident, yesterday, spilling its contents and shutting down the M1, which connects London to the northern part of England.

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1:34pm

Tue November 29, 2011
The Salt

Nestle To Investigate Child Labor On Its Cocoa Farms

Originally published on Tue November 29, 2011 2:40 pm

A worker shovels cocoa beans drying in the sun for export, in Guiglo in western Ivory Coast.
Ben Curtis ASSOCIATED PRESS

Politicians and food executives have been talking about ending the problem of child labor in the West African cocoa industry for the last decade. After shocking revelations that hundreds of thousands of children were forced to harvest cacao beans under abusive conditions, companies pledged to address the practice as "fair trade" entered their lexicon.

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1:29pm

Tue November 29, 2011
The Two-Way

Fired Florida A&M Band Director Says His Hazing Warnings Were Dismissed

Originally published on Tue November 29, 2011 3:44 pm

Julian White, former director of Florida A&M University's famed Marching 100 band, speaks at a news conference in Tallahassee, Fla.
Steve Cannon AP

Florida A&M's famed "Marching 100" band has been rocked by the death of one of its drum majors on Nov. 19. Police still haven't released all the details of his death, but they said Robert Champion had been throwing up and hazing had something to do with it.

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1:00pm

Tue November 29, 2011
Planet Money

Why Do Airlines Keep Going Bankrupt?

Severin Borenstein

American Airlines is filing for bankruptcy protection. The airline is the last of the so-called legacy carriers, airlines that flew interstate routes before de-regulation of the industry, to reach this step. Delta, Northwest, United and US Airways all went through bankruptcy proceedings in the last 10 years.

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1:00pm

Tue November 29, 2011
Economy

What Strong Holiday Retail Means For US Economy

Black Friday sales surged to their highest level since 2007, and early results from Cyber Monday's online sales are up almost 20 percent over 2010. The U.S. economy and many consumers continue to struggle, however, and some forecasters worry that the encouraging retail boost is unsustainable.

1:00pm

Tue November 29, 2011
NPR Story

Alan Rickman: From Severus Snape To 'Seminar'

Originally published on Wed November 30, 2011 12:16 pm

Alan Rickman has played Professor Severus Snape throughout the Harry Potter series.
Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

Actor Alan Rickman has played a loving husband, a terrorist leader, a stern professor of the dark arts and even a caterpillar; from Sense and Sensibility to Die Hard to Harry Potter, his talents have made him recognizable to several generations of moviegoers.

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1:00pm

Tue November 29, 2011
Law

Shifts In Police Tactics To Handle Crowds

Occupy Wall Street protests around the country have raised questions about the role of the police. Norm Stamper, Seattle's former police chief, Philadelphia police commissioner Charles Ramsey and Brooklyn College sociologist Alex Vitale talk about the evolution of crowd control tactics.

1:00pm

Tue November 29, 2011
From Our Listeners

Letters: Thanking Teachers And Missing Faces

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

It's Tuesday and time to read from your comments. On Thanksgiving, we talked to Dave Isay, founder of StoryCorps, about the National Day of Listening, which focused this year on teachers. Kavon Hasari(ph) wrote, I came to the United States at age 12 from Puerto Rico. The rigor and criticism of several English teachers and the French teacher in Miami made me want to become a better writer. Now I make a living writing in English and French.

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1:00pm

Tue November 29, 2011
World

Relationship Sours After Airstrikes In Pakistan

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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12:59pm

Tue November 29, 2011
The Two-Way

Facebook Settles With FTC On Charges It Deceived Users On Privacy

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg talks about history of Facebook during the f/8 conference in San Francisco.
Paul Sakuma AP

The Federal Trade Commission said today that it come to a settlement with Facebook over charges that the social network had deceived consumers about their privacy.

The FTC claims that Facebook "deceived consumers by telling them they could keep their information on Facebook private, and then repeatedly allowing it to be shared and made public."

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12:54pm

Tue November 29, 2011
The Two-Way

Michael Jackson's Doctor Gets 4-Year Sentence

The doctor found guilty of involuntary manslaughter in the 2009 death of pop star Michael Jackson was just sentenced to four years in prison.

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12:15pm

Tue November 29, 2011
World

Protesters In Iran Storm British Embassy

In Iran on Tuesday, students and other protesters stormed the British Embassy in the capital Tehran, smashing windows, throwing firebombs and burning the British flag. The crowd had gathered at the embassy to protest new severe economic sanctions imposed by Britain, cutting off all banking with Iran. Renee Montagne talks with Washington Post reporter Thomas Erdbrink, who is in Tehran.

12:05pm

Tue November 29, 2011
The Two-Way

Reports: Herman Cain 'Reassessing' Campaign

Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain.
Scott Olson Getty Images
(New material based on NPR reporting added to the top of this post at 12:30 p.m. ET.)

Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain is reassessing his campaign but still plans to move ahead at this time, his Iowa campaign director tells The Associated Press and NPR.

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12:03pm

Tue November 29, 2011
Author Interviews

'Physics Of The Future': How We'll Live In 2100?

Originally published on Tue November 29, 2011 11:30 am

Imagine being able to access the Internet through the contact lenses on your eyeballs. Blink, and you'd be online. Meet someone, and you'd have the ability to immediately search their identity. And if your friend happens to be speaking a different language, an instantaneous translation could appear directly in front of you.

That might sound farfetched, but it's something that might very well exist in 30 years or less, says theoretical physicist Michio Kaku.

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12:00pm

Tue November 29, 2011
World

Arab Spring Turns To Arab Autumn

Egypt's parliamentary election is continuing amid protests that are calling for an immediate power transfer from military to civilian rule. Also, in Bahrain, a report found abuses by authorities during months-long unrest. And Syria is facing economic sanctions. Host Michel Martin checks in with Abderrahim Foukara of Al Jazeera International.

12:00pm

Tue November 29, 2011
Africa

Journalist On Being Sexual 'Prey' In Egypt

While covering protests in Cairo last week, Egyptian-American journalist Mona Eltahawy was detained by local security forces. She says she was beaten and sexually assaulted. She recalls her experience with host Michel Martin. (Advisory: This segment contains language that may not be suitable for all audiences.)

12:00pm

Tue November 29, 2011
Around the Nation

History Of Hazing As 'Equal Opportunity Disgrace'

The death of a Florida A&M University drum major is shedding light on a culture of hazing that extends beyond familiar organizations, such as college athletic teams, fraternities and sororities. Host Michel Martin discusses the practice of hazing with Hank Nuwer, the author of several books on the subject. He is also an associate professor of journalism at Franklin College.

11:38am

Tue November 29, 2011
Rebuilding Iraq: What's Next?

After U.S. Troops Leave, What Happens To Iraq?

Tim Arango is The New York Times' Baghdad bureau chief. He has also written for Fortune Magazine and The New York Post.
New York Times

In October, President Obama announced that most U.S. troops would be out of Iraq by the end of 2011, after negotiations with Iraqi leaders failed to extend the troops' presence. Only Marine embassy guards and liaison troops will stay behind in the country, where more than a million troops, in total, have served over the past eight years.

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11:27am

Tue November 29, 2011
The Two-Way

VIDEO: Brawling Senior Citizens, Kapp And Mosca, At Football Reunion

Joe Kapp, left, and Angelo Mosca during their brawl in Vancouver.
YouTube

Five days later, video of two 70-plus year old guys trading blows on stage during a Canadian Football League alumni luncheon in Vancouver is still getting clicks and still drawing lots of attention from the cable news networks, blogs and websites.

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11:03am

Tue November 29, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

With Help, Teens Can Manage Epilepsy

With a little help and guidance, epileptic teens can have most of the same experiences as their peers, including learning to drive.
iStockphoto.com

When Etrudy Mitchell's daughter had her first epileptic seizure at 16 months old, it started off looking like a run of the mill temper tantrum.

"We thought that she was just wanting something that she couldn't have," Mitchell tells host Michel Martin on NPR's Tell Me More. But within moments, the situation took a dramatic turn. "She turned blue. The body turned limp, and we dialed 911."

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10:59am

Tue November 29, 2011
Education

In Texas, Keeping Kids In School And Out Of Court

Originally published on Wed November 30, 2011 6:49 pm

Seventy students a day are sent to the Waco Alternative School Campus, after being "ticketed" for bad behavior in municipal court.
Marisa Peñaloza NPR

The sort of offenses that might land a student in the principal's office in other states often send kids in Texas to court with misdemeanor charges. Some schools have started rethinking the way they punish students for bad behavior after watching many of them drop out or land in prison because of tough disciplinary policies.

In a downtown Houston municipal court, Judge David Fraga has presided over thousands of cases involving students "ticketed" by school police. His docket is still relatively small at the moment, with only 45 to 65 cases per night.

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10:20am

Tue November 29, 2011
The Two-Way

Consumer Confidence Bounces Higher

Though "overall readings remain historically weak," consumer confidence went up sharply this month, the private research group known as The Conference Board just reported.

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9:17am

Tue November 29, 2011
The Two-Way

Home Prices 'Drifted Lower' In Recent Months

One reason prices have been falling: A glut of foreclosed homes.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Home prices across the U.S. are still only "back to their first quarter of 2003 levels" and "drifted lower in September and the third quarter," according to the widely watched S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Indices, which were just released.

As The Associated Press says, the news is "the latest evidence that the troubled housing market won't recover any time soon."

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