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9:30am

Fri November 18, 2011

9:17am

Fri November 18, 2011
The Two-Way

New Tests Support Claim That Speed Of Light's Been Broken

A 2010 light installation entitled 'Speed of Light' in London.
Ben Stansall AFP/Getty Images

It's not the final word, but scientists at the Italian Institute for Nuclear Physics report today that "new tests conducted at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of INFN by the OPERA Collaboration, with a specially set up neutrino beam from CERN, confirm so far the previous results on the measurement of the neutrino velocity."

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9:00am

Fri November 18, 2011
The Two-Way

Syracuse Assistant Coach Put On Leave After New Accusation

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 3:51 pm

Update at 3:50 p.m. ET: Syracuse assistant basketball coach Bernie Fine has called the accusations about him "patently false," The Associated Press reports.

Our original post:

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8:34am

Fri November 18, 2011
The Two-Way

Tea Party And Occupy Members Find Common Ground In Memphis

An Associated Press reporter was on hand last night in Tennessee when two representatives from the Occupy Memphis movement sat down with about 75 members of the Mid-South Tea Party and had what's described as a "sometimes strained and confrontational, but mostly civil discussion."

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7:45am

Fri November 18, 2011
The Two-Way

Robert Wagner Supports New Look Into Natalie Wood's Death

Authorities in Los Angeles plan to say more later today about why they're reopening the investigation into actress Natalie Wood's drowning death over the weekend of Thanksgiving 1981.

Wood's husband at the time, actor Robert Wagner, says through a spokesman that he supports the new probe.

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7:43am

Fri November 18, 2011
Economy

Toast Sandwich Is Cheap And Easy But Is It Good?

In these hard times, Britain's Royal Academy of Chemistry has come up with the cheapest meal of all: a toast sandwich. They found the recipe in the Victorian bestseller: Mrs. Beeton's Book of Household Management. It's a piece of toast between two buttered slices of bread and costs 12 cents to make.

7:30am

Fri November 18, 2011
Around the Nation

Columbia's Band Banned From Final Football Game

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 7:31 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. The Columbia University Marching Band is known for its sense of humor, but their joke fell flat at a recent football game against Cornell. In a parody of the school fight song, the band sang: We always lose, lose, lose by a lot; sometimes, by a little - which is accurate. Their loss to Cornell was their ninth straight this year.

The athletic department wasn't amused. They banned the marching band from the final game of the season. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

7:15am

Fri November 18, 2011
The Two-Way

'Flickers Of Progress' Prompt Plan For Clinton To Visit Myanmar

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 12:24 pm

Myanmar pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi.
Khin Maung Win AP

When he announced early today that Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton will visit Myanmar next month, President Obama cited "flickers of progress" on respect for human rights in the country also known as Burma as grounds for the first visit by an American secretary of state in 50 years.

Among those signs: the release of some political prisoners new President Thein Sein's government and relaxing of some restrictions on the media.

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4:00am

Fri November 18, 2011
NPR Story

Obama In Bali For East Asia Summit

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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4:00am

Fri November 18, 2011
NPR Story

Penn State Child Sex Abuse Scandal Still Raises Questions

The child sex abuse scandal at Penn State is raising more and more questions about who knew what, when and what actions were, or were not taken. Elements of the unfolding scandal remain quite confusing. Former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky is charged with abusing young boys.

4:00am

Fri November 18, 2011
NPR Story

Italy's New Government Passes 1st Confidence Vote

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 5:33 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Italy's new prime minister has pledged far-reaching reforms. An economist himself, Mario Monti has managed to win a vote of confidence for his new national unity government by an overwhelming majority in Italy's senate. Still, Europe's debt crisis is gathering more steam and now pushing borrowing costs for Spain and France sharply higher. As NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports, pressure is mounting on the European Central Bank to act to stem the crisis.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

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4:00am

Fri November 18, 2011
Business

Oil Prices Raise Sharply On Improving U.S. Economy

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 7:16 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with oil prices hovering around $99 a barrel. Oil has gone up sharply since last month, partly because of signs of improvement in the U.S. economy. Also because of tensions in some oil producing regions, which could affect supplies. Still, the debt crisis in Europe is holding prices below that psychologically important $100 a barrel mark. Benchmark crude was trading in Asia this morning at about $98.90. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

4:00am

Fri November 18, 2011
Politics

House Panel Questions Chu About Solyndra Loan

Energy Secretary Steven Chu appeared before a House oversight subcommittee Thursday to defend his agency's decision to lend $500 million in federal money to Solyndra, a company that made solar panels and is now bankrupt. The company is the subject of numerous federal investigations.

4:00am

Fri November 18, 2011
Business

Honda Works To Assure Quality Cars

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Los Angeles Auto Show begins today. It's the first of America's car shows and it's where manufacturers put their best foot forward or try to reinvent themselves. One those carmakers is Honda. Honda's production was badly hurt by Japan's earthquake and tsunami, and as it was getting back on track, the floods in Thailand crippled production again. But as NPR's Sonari Glinton reports from the L.A. Auto Show, natural disasters may be the least of Honda's problems.

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4:00am

Fri November 18, 2011
Business

Big, Small Cars Adorn LA Auto Show

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 7:12 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's Nina Gregory was also looking around the L.A. Auto Show searching for new extremes. She wanted to see some of the biggest offerings automakers had on display this year and also the littlest.

NINA GREGORY, BYLINE: The newest entry to the teeny tiny market is the Chevrolet Spark, a 144-inch four-door.

BRANDY SCHAFFELS: You might like the sound...

(SOUNDBITE OF DOOR SLAMMING)

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4:00am

Fri November 18, 2011
Business

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 7:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's consider now, those vehicles that offer something really cheap - the food trucks that have become so popular. At the L.A. Auto Show, Nissan has on display a new truck specially designed for mobile restaurateurs. Our last word in business today is: culinary concept car.

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4:00am

Fri November 18, 2011
Europe

Why Germany Needs The Eurozone To Be A Success

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The outcome in Italy is, of course, of huge importance to Germany. Germany is the strongest economy in the eurozone and has a deep historical interest in the euro's success. We asked the economist Nicolas Veron to remind us of Germany's role in this grand monetary experiment.

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4:00am

Fri November 18, 2011
Around the Nation

Will Football Remain King At Penn State?

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 9:45 pm

Interim Penn State football coach Tom Bradley, shown here at a Nov. 12 game against the Nebraska Cornhuskers, is now focused on Saturday's game against Ohio State.
Justin K. Aller Getty Images

Football has long been beloved at Penn State, and the program is one of the most lucrative in the country. But as the biggest scandal in the school's history continues to roil the campus, some in State College, Pa., are beginning to question football's influence.

At his news conference this week, interim Penn State football coach Tom Bradley tried to focus on Saturday's game in Columbus.

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3:01am

Fri November 18, 2011
Newt Gingrich

To Imagine A Gingrich Presidency, Look To The '90s

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 2:54 pm

In September 1994, then-House Minority Whip Newt Gingrich addressed Republican congressional candidates on Capitol Hill during a rally where they pledged a new "Contract with America." Months later, Republicans gained control of both houses of Congress for the first time in decades, and Gingrich became speaker of the House.
John Duricka AP

Newt Gingrich served as speaker of the House of Representatives for four turbulent and productive years.

From 1995 through 1998, Congress forced a government shutdown, overhauled the welfare system, balanced the budget for the first time in decades and impeached a president for the second time in history.

Gingrich was in the middle of those debates, fiery in his rhetoric, yet willing to compromise and work with a Democratic president.

The 104th Congress

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12:01am

Fri November 18, 2011
Middle East

Attacks Target Palestinians In Israeli Towns

A woman shouts slogans during a demonstration against the desecration of headstones at a Muslim and Christian cemetery in Jaffa, Israel, last month. A few dozen Israelis and Palestinians turned out in a show of protest against recent attacks.
Ammar Awad Reuters /Landov

In Israel, tensions are rising between Jews and Palestinian Arabs, who make up about 20 percent of the population. Over the past few months, several Arab sites have been vandalized by militant Jews who left graffiti such as "Death to Arabs."

Locals blame activists from Israeli settlements in the occupied West Bank.

At a recent demonstration on a street corner in the central Israeli town of Jaffa, protesters chant in both Hebrew and Arabic. The crowd is made up of Jews and Palestinians angry over the attacks, which have rocked their community.

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12:01am

Fri November 18, 2011
Economy

Would Supercommittee Failure Roil Markets?

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 4:34 pm

Analysts worry that failure by the supercommittee to reach a credible debt-reduction deal could upset financial markets, force up interest rates and hurt the economy.
Scott Olson Getty Images

With Wednesday's deadline looming, the congressional supercommittee still seems far from an agreement, causing concern that failure could send financial markets into a spiral.

The bipartisan panel, charged with finding budget cuts or new revenues to reduce the deficit by at least $1.2 trillion over the next 10 years, is a child of the summer's debt-ceiling debate. It was an escape hatch for Congress and the president when they couldn't reach agreement on big deficit-reduction measures. That game of chicken helped to send the stock market sliding.

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10:00pm

Thu November 17, 2011
StoryCorps

The Parenting Dance: Hold Tight While Letting Go

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 10:09 am

Joshua Littman and his mother, Sarah, visited StoryCorps for the second time to talk about their evolving relationship. Their first visit was in 2006.
StoryCorps

When Sarah Littman took her son, Joshua, to college this fall, it was hard.

"I thought I was gonna cry the whole way back from college," she says during a visit to StoryCorps in New York City. "But I managed to make it until I got home. And then I walked upstairs and I saw your door shut and I just lost it."

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7:58pm

Thu November 17, 2011
Movie Reviews

'The Descendants': In Paradise, A Stranger To Himself

Island Son: George Clooney (left, with Shailene Woodley and Amara Miller) navigates tricky territory as a Hawaii man whose wife is on life support.
Fox Searchlight Pictures

Writer-director Alexander Payne is either the American cinema's most acerbic humanist or its most empathetic jerk. Whichever it is, the protagonists of the novels he adapts are outsiders who pay an emotional price for their sense of superiority.

Payne's The Descendants is his first film to be told from the perspective of a person of privilege, but real-estate lawyer Matt King (George Clooney) is the ultimate outsider: a stranger to his family and his lifelong home, Hawaii.

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6:42pm

Thu November 17, 2011
Deceptive Cadence

Turkey, Cranberries And Composers At The Table

Originally published on Fri November 18, 2011 12:01 am

Which composers would you invite to your Thanksgiving table?
iStock

5:56pm

Thu November 17, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

GAVI To Make HPV Vaccine Available In Developing Countries

Women in developing countries, such as Cote D'Ivoire, may soon have access to vaccines against HPV and rubella.
KAMBOU SIA AFP/Getty

Women in developing countries will soon have access to vaccines for human papillomavirus and rubella, the GAVI Alliance announced today.

HPV causes about 275,000 cervical cancer deaths each year, and 88 percent of those deaths occur in developing countries. GAVI says the vaccine is critical for women and girls living in these areas because they don't have access to screenings for cervical cancer.

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5:49pm

Thu November 17, 2011
NPR Story

Obama Turns Focus On Pacific Allies

Originally published on Thu November 17, 2011 5:59 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

From NPR News, it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Guy Raz.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. President Obama arrived in Indonesia today, the latest stop in a 10 day trip across the Pacific. He's used the trip to send a message that the U.S. is shifting its attention to the Asia Pacific region, both for economic and security reasons. That includes the announcement yesterday that the U.S. will deploy 2,500 Marines to Australia.

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5:15pm

Thu November 17, 2011
The Salt

Swipe A Loyalty Card, Help A Food Detective?

These cards could provide a treasure trove of information for epidemiologists.
Melissa Forsyth NPR

Imagine someone asking you what you had for breakfast, lunch and dinner weeks ago. Most of us would do a fair to miserable job of recalling that. But it's exactly the information that investigators need to sleuth out the source of an outbreak of Salmonella or E. coli, as German officials learned the hard way this summer.

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5:08pm

Thu November 17, 2011
Governing

GOP Supercommittee Members Consider Tax Increase

Grover Norquist, president of the taxpayer advocacy group Americans for Tax Reform
Haraz N. Ghanbari AP

The congressional deficit-reduction supercommittee must agree before Thanksgiving to slice more than $1 trillion from projected deficits, or that money will be cut automatically from future budgets.

The fundamental divide between the panel's six Democrats and six Republicans has been over whether tax revenues should come into play. And with less than a week to go before the deadline, some Republicans are considering new tax revenue. But even the hint of compromise on that issue is dividing Republicans on Capitol Hill.

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4:59pm

Thu November 17, 2011
The Two-Way

Occupy Wall Street: A Lesson On An 'Organic Movement'

A large gathering of protesters affiliated with the Occupy Wall Street Movement attend a rally in Union Square in New York City.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

When you ask a lot of the Occupiers questions about their ideal government, they tell you then want an "organic" government or a "true democracy." Something a lot like what they created at Zuccotti Park, they say.

That's probably why there's been so much press coverage about the confusion of the movement's message. But, walking around and talking to many of the protesters today, it's obvious that it's a movement that has brought together a lot of people with very different ideologies.

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4:49pm

Thu November 17, 2011
Author Interviews

U.S. Behind The Curve In Drunk Driving, Author Finds

A new book called One for the Road explores the history of drunk driving and attitudes around it.
iStockphoto.com

When Barron Lerner was writing his book on the history of drunk driving in America — and efforts to control it — he carried out an experiment at home that involved a bottle of vodka, a shot glass and a Breathalyzer. He was the guinea pig.

"I was trying to figure out just how drunk you had to be in order to not drive safely," says Lerner, a professor of medicine and public health at Columbia University, who wrote One for the Road. He decided to drink and test his levels — but he didn't actually get into a car.

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